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Oaks Quercus

Other Common Name(s):

Phonetic Spelling
KWER-kus
This plant has low severity poison characteristics.
See below
Description

Oaks come in sizes from shrubs to large trees and can be evergreen or deciduous. There are at least 450 species within the genus which is in the beech family. Many are native to North America but many species are found in Europe and Asia. They can be ornamental or lumber trees and many provide wildlife value.

The alternate, simple leaves vary greatly in shape depending on the species and margins can be lobed, toothed or smooth. Some trees display colorful leaves in the fall and many hold onto their leaves into winter. The separate male and female flowers are borne in catkins and clusters in spring and the fruit is a nut called an acorn that usually has a cap. 

Oaks can be found in wet to dry sites, in mountains and the coastal areas, in fact just about anywhere you live there is an oak suitable for you. Planting native oaks is one of the best things you can do for the preservation of wildlife.

See this plant in the following landscape:
Cultivars / Varieties:
Tags:
#shade tree#poisonous#wildlife plant#moths#tree#nighttime garden#larval host plant#ornamental#garden walls#butterfly friendly#pollinator garden#problem for horses#moth larva#banded hairstreak butterfly#gray hairstreak butterfly#imperial moth#juvenal’s duskywing butterfly#edward’s hairstreak butterfly#white-m hairstreak butterfly#horace’s duskywing butterfly
 
Cultivars / Varieties:
Tags:
#shade tree#poisonous#wildlife plant#moths#tree#nighttime garden#larval host plant#ornamental#garden walls#butterfly friendly#pollinator garden#problem for horses#moth larva#banded hairstreak butterfly#gray hairstreak butterfly#imperial moth#juvenal’s duskywing butterfly#edward’s hairstreak butterfly#white-m hairstreak butterfly#horace’s duskywing butterfly
  • Attributes:
    Genus:
    Quercus
    Family:
    Fagaceae
    Life Cycle:
    Woody
    Recommended Propagation Strategy:
    Seed
    Country Or Region Of Origin:
    Temp. Northern Hemisphere to Malesia and Colombia
    Distribution:
    Throughout and cultivated
    Wildlife Value:
    Oak trees support a wide variety of Lepidopteran. You may see Imperial Moth (Eacles imperialis) larvae which have one brood per season and appear from April-October in the south. Adult Imperial Moths do not feed. Banded Hairstreak (Satyrium calanus), which have one flight from June-August everywhere but Florida where they emerge April-May. Edward's Hairstreak (Satyrium edwardsii), has one flight from May-July in the south and June-July in the north. Gray Hairstreak (Strymon melinus), has three to four flights in the south from February-November and two flights in the north from May-September. White-M Hairstreak (Parrhasius m-album) has three broods in the north from February-October. Horace’s Duskywing (Erynnis horatius) has three broods in Texas and the deep south from January-November, and two broods in the north from April-September. Juvenal’s Duskywing (Erynnis juvenalis) has one brood from April-June, appearing as early as January in Florida. Acorns provide food to birds and mammals. The tree provides shelter to birds and mammals. They are host plants to moths and butterflies.
    Play Value:
    Wildlife Cover/Habitat
    Wildlife Food Source
    Edibility:
    Acorns (nuts) are edible after tannins are leached or boiled out.
  • Whole Plant Traits:
    Plant Type:
    Edible
    Poisonous
    Tree
    Woody Plant Leaf Characteristics:
    Broadleaf Evergreen
    Deciduous
    Semi-evergreen
    Habit/Form:
    Erect
    Maintenance:
    Medium
  • Cultural Conditions:
    Light:
    Full sun (6 or more hours of direct sunlight a day)
    Partial Shade (Direct sunlight only part of the day, 2-6 hours)
    NC Region:
    Coastal
    Mountains
    Piedmont
  • Fruit:
    Fruit Color:
    Brown/Copper
    Green
    Display/Harvest Time:
    Fall
    Fruit Type:
    Nut
    Fruit Description:
    Acorns vary in size and shape depending on the species.
  • Flowers:
    Flower Inflorescence:
    Catkin
    Flower Bloom Time:
    Spring
    Flower Description:
    Pollen flowers in drooping, elongated clusters.
  • Leaves:
    Woody Plant Leaf Characteristics:
    Broadleaf Evergreen
    Deciduous
    Semi-evergreen
    Leaf Color:
    Green
    Leaf Feel:
    Glossy
    Deciduous Leaf Fall Color:
    Brown/Copper
    Gold/Yellow
    Orange
    Red/Burgundy
    Leaf Type:
    Simple
    Leaf Arrangement:
    Alternate
    Leaf Margin:
    Entire
    Lobed
    Serrate
    Hairs Present:
    No
    Leaf Description:
    Leaves are simple and alternate. The shape and size vary as to the species. Margins can be lobed, toothed or smooth. Fall color varies from none to reds, yellows or orange.
  • Bark:
    Bark Color:
    Black
    Dark Gray
    Surface/Attachment:
    Furrowed
    Scaly
    Bark Description:
    The bark is gray and scaly or blackish and furrowed.
  • Stem:
    Stem Color:
    Brown/Copper
    Gray/Silver
    Stem Is Aromatic:
    No
    Stem Bud Terminal:
    Cluster of terminal buds
    Stem Description:
    Twigs are slender with a star-shaped pith.
  • Landscape:
    Landscape Location:
    Lawn
    Naturalized Area
    Woodland
    Landscape Theme:
    Butterfly Garden
    Nighttime Garden
    Pollinator Garden
    Design Feature:
    Shade Tree
    Specimen
    Street Tree
    Attracts:
    Butterflies
    Moths
    Pollinators
    Small Mammals
    Songbirds
    Problems:
    Problem for Horses
  • Poisonous to Humans:
    Poison Severity:
    Low
    Poison Symptoms:
    Abdominal pain, constipation then diarrhea (occasionally bloody), depression, frequent urination, discolored urine, jaundice; acorns can obstruct the digestive tract
    Poison Toxic Principle:
    Gallotannins, quercitrin, and quercitin
    Causes Contact Dermatitis:
    No
    Poison Part:
    Fruits
    Leaves