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Quercus stellata Quercus stellata

Common Name(s):

  • Post Oak
Description

Quercus stellata, commonly called post oak, is a medium-sized deciduous oak of the white oak group that typically grows 35-50’ tall with a rounded crown. It is called post oak because its durable wood has been used for fence posts. It is commonly found on lower mountain slopes and coastal plains in the southeastern and southcentral U.S. The bark is scaly in younger trees.  As the tree ages, a more blocky and a rigid appearance develops.

 

Seasons of Interest: 

  Leaves:   Fall         Blooms:   Early spring            Nut/Fruit/Seed:  Fall

 

Insects, Diseases, or Other Plant Problems:  Oaks are susceptible to a large number of diseases, including chestnut blight, shoestring root rot, anthracnose, oak leaf blister, cankers, leaf spots, and powdery mildew. This tree is resistant to oak wilt.  Potential insect pests include scale, oak skeletonizer, leaf miner, galls, oak lace bugs, borers, caterpillars and nut weevils.

Cultivars:
Tags:
#butterflies#deciduous#shade tree#wildlife plant#wildlife tree#host plant#small mammals#low flammability#black bears#wild turkeys#deer resistant#woodpeckers#blue jays#acorns#fire resistant
Cultivars:
Tags:
#butterflies#deciduous#shade tree#wildlife plant#wildlife tree#host plant#small mammals#low flammability#black bears#wild turkeys#deer resistant#woodpeckers#blue jays#acorns#fire resistant
  • Attributes:
    Genus:
    Quercus
    Species:
    stellata
    Family:
    Fagaceae
    Life Cycle:
    Woody
    Country Or Region Of Origin:
    Eastern United States
    Fire Risk Rating:
    low flammability
    Wildlife Value:
    It is a host plant for the Banded Hairstreak, Edward's Hairstreak, Grey Hairstreak, White-M Hairstreak, Horace's Duskywing, and Juvanals Duskywing butterflies.  The acorns are eaten by woodpeckers, blue jays, small mammals, wild turkeys, white-tailed deer, and black bear.
    Play Value:
    Wildlife Enhancement
    Particularly Resistant To (Insects/Diseases/Other Problems):
    resistant to fire and mildly resistant to damage by deer.
    Dimensions:
    Height: 40 ft. 0 in. - 50 ft. 0 in.
    Width: 35 ft. 0 in. - 50 ft. 0 in.
  • Whole Plant Traits:
    Plant Type:
    Native Plant
    Poisonous
    Tree
    Leaf Characteristics:
    Deciduous
    Habit/Form:
    Rounded
    Spreading
    Growth Rate:
    Slow
    Maintenance:
    Low
    Texture:
    Medium
  • Cultural Conditions:
    Light:
    Full Sun (Direct sunlight 8+ hours a day)
    Soil Texture:
    Loam (Silt)
    Sand
    Soil pH:
    Acid (<6.0)
    Soil Drainage:
    Good Drainage
    Available Space To Plant:
    more than 60 feet
    NC Region:
    Coastal
    Mountains
    Piedmont
    Usda Plant Hardiness Zone:
    5a, 5b, 6a, 6b, 7a, 7b, 8a, 8b, 9a, 9b
  • Fruit:
    Display/Harvest Time:
    Fall
    Fruit Type:
    Nut
    Fruit Description:
    The fruits are oval acorns (to 3/4” long), with bowl-shaped cups extending 1/3 to 1/2 the acorn length. The acorn requires one growing season to reach maturity.
  • Flower:
    Flower Color:
    Brown/Copper
    Gold/Yellow
    Flower Inflorescence:
    Insignificant
    Flower Description:
    The Post oak has insignificant yellowish-green flowers in separate male and female catkins that appear in the spring as the leaves emerge.
  • Leaves:
    Leaf Characteristics:
    Deciduous
    Leaf Color:
    Brown/Copper
    Green
    Leaf Feel:
    Leathery
    Deciduous Leaf Fall Color:
    Brown/Copper
    Leaf Type:
    Simple
    Leaf Arrangement:
    Alternate
    Leaf Margin:
    Lobed
    Hairs Present:
    No
    Leaf Length:
    3-6 inches
    Leaf Width:
    1-3 inches
    Leaf Description:
    The leaves of the Post oak are rough and often leathery. They are alternate, simple and dark green (4-8” long) with 3-5 rounded lobes that have a cruciform appearance due to large wide-spreading central lobes. This tree has variable fall color, from non-showy to golden brown. The leaves persist into winter.
  • Bark:
    Surface/Attachment:
    Ridges
    Bark Description:
    The bark is scaly in younger trees. As the tree ages, a more blocky and a rigid appearance develops.
  • Stem:
    Stem Is Aromatic:
    No
  • Landscape:
    Landscape Location:
    Naturalized Area
    Woodland
    Landscape Theme:
    Butterfly Garden
    Native Garden
    Design Feature:
    Shade Tree
    Attracts:
    Butterflies
    Resistance To Challenges:
    Deer
    Dry Soil
    Poor Soil