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Quercus laurifolia is often confused with:
Quercus hemisphaerica Form
Plants that fill a similar niche:
Quercus michauxii Form
Quercus nigra Form
Quercus montana Form

Quercus laurifolia

Common Name(s):

Previously known as:

  • Lithocarpus korthalsii
  • Quercus hemisphaerica
  • Quercus obtusa
  • Quercus phellos var. laurifolia
  • Quercus succulenta
Phonetic Spelling
KWER-kus law-ree-FOH-lee-uh
This plant has low severity poison characteristics.
See below
Description

Laurel Oak is a semi-evergreen to a deciduous shade tree in the red oak family that is native to the southeastern U.S.A. from Virginia to Florida and west to Texas. In North Carolina, it can be found in moderately dry to seasonally flooded soils of floodplains and swamp margins in the Piedmont and coastal plain areas. It generally grows 40-60 feet tall and rarely to 100 feet with a dense rounded crown. Acorns may be produced as early as 15 years of age.

Laurel Oak is adaptable to various soil types even poorly drained clay soil. It will grow in full sun to partial shade. Use this tree as a shade tree in lawns or parks.

See this plant in the following landscape:
Cultivars / Varieties:
Tags:
#sun#showy flowers#shade tree#full sun#partial shade#semi-evergreen#wildlife plant#partial sun#native tree#moths#tree#spring flowers#flowering tree#moist soil#food source#NC native#well-drained soil#nighttime garden#native garden#floodplain#spring interest#larval host plant#food source fall#food source herbage#Coastal FACW#Piedmont Mountains FACW#fruits#bird friendly#food source hard-mast fruit#food source hard mast fruit#mammals#butterfly friendly#butterfly larvae#fruits early fall#swamp#fruit#larval host tree#pollinator garden#problem for horses#audubon#moth larva#banded hairstreak butterfly#gray hairstreak butterfly#imperial moth#juvenal’s duskywing butterfly#edward’s hairstreak butterfly#white-m hairstreak butterfly#horace’s duskywing butterfly
 
Cultivars / Varieties:
Tags:
#sun#showy flowers#shade tree#full sun#partial shade#semi-evergreen#wildlife plant#partial sun#native tree#moths#tree#spring flowers#flowering tree#moist soil#food source#NC native#well-drained soil#nighttime garden#native garden#floodplain#spring interest#larval host plant#food source fall#food source herbage#Coastal FACW#Piedmont Mountains FACW#fruits#bird friendly#food source hard-mast fruit#food source hard mast fruit#mammals#butterfly friendly#butterfly larvae#fruits early fall#swamp#fruit#larval host tree#pollinator garden#problem for horses#audubon#moth larva#banded hairstreak butterfly#gray hairstreak butterfly#imperial moth#juvenal’s duskywing butterfly#edward’s hairstreak butterfly#white-m hairstreak butterfly#horace’s duskywing butterfly
  • Attributes:
    Genus:
    Quercus
    Species:
    laurifolia
    Family:
    Fagaceae
    Life Cycle:
    Woody
    Recommended Propagation Strategy:
    Seed
    Country Or Region Of Origin:
    Southeastern U.S.A. to TX
    Distribution:
    AL , AR , FL , GA , LA , MD , MS , NC , PA , SC , TX , VA
    Wildlife Value:
    Oak trees support a wide variety of Lepidopteran. You may see Imperial Moth (Eacles imperialis) larvae which have one brood per season and appear from April-October in the south. Adult Imperial Moths do not feed. Banded Hairstreak (Satyrium calanus), which have one flight from June-August everywhere but Florida where they emerge April-May. Edward's Hairstreak (Satyrium edwardsii), has one flight from May-July in the south and June-July in the north. Gray Hairstreak (Strymon melinus), has three to four flights in the south from February-November and two flights in the north from May-September. White-M Hairstreak (Parrhasius m-album) has three broods in the north from February-October. Horace’s Duskywing (Erynnis horatius) has three broods in Texas and the deep south from January-November, and two broods in the north from April-September. Juvenal’s Duskywing (Erynnis juvenalis) has one brood from April-June, appearing as early as January in Florida. Birds and mammals use the nuts from this tree as a food source. Birds and small mammals use this tree for nesting.
    Play Value:
    Wildlife Cover/Habitat
    Wildlife Food Source
    Wildlife Larval Host
    Wildlife Nesting
  • Whole Plant Traits:
    Plant Type:
    Native Plant
    Tree
    Woody Plant Leaf Characteristics:
    Semi-evergreen
    Habit/Form:
    Dense
    Erect
    Rounded
    Growth Rate:
    Medium
    Maintenance:
    Medium
  • Cultural Conditions:
    Light:
    Full sun (6 or more hours of direct sunlight a day)
    Partial Shade (Direct sunlight only part of the day, 2-6 hours)
    Soil Texture:
    Clay
    High Organic Matter
    Loam (Silt)
    Sand
    Soil pH:
    Acid (<6.0)
    Soil Drainage:
    Good Drainage
    Moist
    Occasionally Wet
    NC Region:
    Coastal
    USDA Plant Hardiness Zone:
    7b, 7a, 8b, 8a, 9b, 9a
  • Fruit:
    Fruit Color:
    Brown/Copper
    Display/Harvest Time:
    Fall
    Fruit Type:
    Nut
    Fruit Length:
    < 1 inch
    Fruit Width:
    < 1 inch
    Fruit Description:
    1/2 to 2/3 inch long round dark brown and striated acorn. The scaly cap is usually shallow but may cover up to 1/3 of the acorn. Matures in 2 years.
  • Flowers:
    Flower Inflorescence:
    Catkin
    Insignificant
    Flower Bloom Time:
    Spring
    Flower Description:
    Male catkins are yellow-green. Female flowers are small reddish spikes.
  • Leaves:
    Woody Plant Leaf Characteristics:
    Semi-evergreen
    Leaf Type:
    Simple
    Leaf Arrangement:
    Alternate
    Leaf Shape:
    Elliptical
    Oblong
    Leaf Margin:
    Entire
    Lobed
    Hairs Present:
    No
    Leaf Length:
    3-6 inches
    Leaf Width:
    1-3 inches
    Leaf Description:
    The 3-5 inch long and 1.5 inch wide elliptic to oblong leathery leaves are glossy green with paler undersides. Margins entire with shallow lobes. The leaves last into winter in warmer climates.
  • Bark:
    Bark Color:
    Dark Brown
    Surface/Attachment:
    Fissured
    Ridges
    Bark Description:
    Dark brown and initially smooth. Develops shallow fissures with flat, rough ridges at maturity.
  • Stem:
    Stem Color:
    Brown/Copper
    Red/Burgundy
    Stem Is Aromatic:
    No
    Stem Buds:
    Smooth/Hairless
    Stem Bud Terminal:
    Cluster of terminal buds
    Stem Surface:
    Smooth (glabrous)
    Stem Description:
    Slender, light reddish-brown, smooth, buds are sharp-pointed reddish-brown and clustered at twig ends.
  • Landscape:
    Landscape Location:
    Lawn
    Landscape Theme:
    Butterfly Garden
    Native Garden
    Nighttime Garden
    Pollinator Garden
    Design Feature:
    Shade Tree
    Attracts:
    Butterflies
    Moths
    Pollinators
    Small Mammals
    Songbirds
    Problems:
    Problem for Horses
  • Poisonous to Humans:
    Poison Severity:
    Low
    Poison Symptoms:
    Abdominal pain, constipation then diarrhea (occasionally bloody), depression, frequent urination, discolored urine, jaundice; acorns can obstruct the digestive tract
    Poison Toxic Principle:
    Gallotannin
    Causes Contact Dermatitis:
    No
    Poison Part:
    Fruits
    Leaves