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Rubus cuneifolius is often confused with:
Rubus pascuus
Plants that fill a similar niche:
Rubus canadensis Rubus canadensis
Rubus flagellaris Rubus flagellaris
Rubus pensilvanicus Form in bloom

Dewberry Rubus cuneifolius

Other Common Name(s):

Phonetic Spelling
ROO-bus kew-nee-FOH-lee-us
Description

The Genus Rubus includes blackberry, dewberry, and raspberry and most members of the Genus share the traits of thorny or bristly stems and compound leaves. Also, flowers and fruit appear on last seasons canes (branches), seldom on new shoots, which means one must be cautious when pruning and not remove the canes that will yield next year's berries. There are differences, however, among species; for example, some are erect or arching shrubs up to 8 feet high and others trail on the ground like vines. Some, such as dewberries, produce fruits in the spring while blackberries and raspberries fruit during the summer. In general, Genus Rubus contains some of the most important plants for wildlife in the southeast.

Rubus cuneifolius, or Sand blackberry, is distinguished from other members of the Rubus genus because it is a strong deciduous  shrub with an erect, never arching, form. A common blackberry in the Coastal Plain of North Carolina, Sand Blackberry also occurs in a few counties in the Piedmont.

Insects, Diseases, and Other Plant Problems:

Plants in this genus are notably susceptible to honey fungus. That said, this plant has no known insect or disease problems, but it can become aggressive and difficult to eliminate. Because it is so successful and can spread easily, use caution when selecting a planting site. Herbicides may be required to completely eliminate the plant.

See this plant in the following landscape:
Cultivars / Varieties:
Tags:
#deciduous#heat tolerant#shrub#wildlife plant#piedmont#cover plant#coastal#specialized bees#native garden#edible fruits#food source summer#food source winter#food source nectar#food source pollen#piedmont mountains UPL#wet soils tolerant#nectar plant late spring#mammals#food source soft mast fruit#butterfly friendly#nectar plant early summer#nectar plant mid-spring#nectar plant mid-summer#nectar plant late summer#Coastal FACU#butterflies#pollinators#pollinator garden#birds#audubon
 
Cultivars / Varieties:
Tags:
#deciduous#heat tolerant#shrub#wildlife plant#piedmont#cover plant#coastal#specialized bees#native garden#edible fruits#food source summer#food source winter#food source nectar#food source pollen#piedmont mountains UPL#wet soils tolerant#nectar plant late spring#mammals#food source soft mast fruit#butterfly friendly#nectar plant early summer#nectar plant mid-spring#nectar plant mid-summer#nectar plant late summer#Coastal FACU#butterflies#pollinators#pollinator garden#birds#audubon
  • Attributes:
    Genus:
    Rubus
    Species:
    cuneifolius
    Family:
    Rosaceae
    Life Cycle:
    Perennial
    Recommended Propagation Strategy:
    Division
    Seed
    Stem Cutting
    Country Or Region Of Origin:
    Eastern United States
    Wildlife Value:
    The nectar and pollen of the Sand blackberry flowers attract many kinds of insects, butterflies, and especially long-tongued and short-tongued bees. It provides protective cover year round for numerous small animals and birds. The fruits are relished by songbirds, small mammals, foxes, racoons and black bears. During the winter, birds and small mammals eat the seeds left from rotten fruit. White-tailed deer and rabbits browse the leaves.
    Particularly Resistant To (Insects/Diseases/Other Problems):
    Heat tolerant
    Edibility:
    The fruit can be eaten raw or cooked. Dry but sweet and with a good flavour. The fruit can be up to an inch long.
  • Whole Plant Traits:
    Plant Type:
    Edible
    Native Plant
    Shrub
    Woody Plant Leaf Characteristics:
    Deciduous
    Semi-evergreen
    Habit/Form:
    Erect
    Growth Rate:
    Medium
    Maintenance:
    Low
    Appendage:
    Prickles
  • Cultural Conditions:
    Light:
    Full sun (6 or more hours of direct sunlight a day)
    Partial Shade (Direct sunlight only part of the day, 2-6 hours)
    Soil Texture:
    Sand
    Shallow Rocky
    Soil pH:
    Acid (<6.0)
    Alkaline (>8.0)
    Neutral (6.0-8.0)
    Soil Drainage:
    Good Drainage
    Occasionally Dry
    NC Region:
    Coastal
    Piedmont
    USDA Plant Hardiness Zone:
    5a, 5b, 6b, 6a, 7a, 7b, 8a, 8b, 9b, 9a
  • Fruit:
    Fruit Color:
    Black
    Fruit Value To Gardener:
    Edible
    Display/Harvest Time:
    Summer
    Fruit Type:
    Aggregate
    Drupe
    Fruit Length:
    < 1 inch
    Fruit Description:
    Fruit can be eaten raw or cooked. Dry but sweet and with a good flavor. Black fruit displays from June to July.
  • Flowers:
    Flower Color:
    White
    Flower Bloom Time:
    Spring
    Summer
    Flower Description:
    In bloom from April to June. The plant produces apomictic flowers, these produce fruit and viable seed without fertilization, each seedling is a genetic copy of the parent.
  • Leaves:
    Woody Plant Leaf Characteristics:
    Deciduous
    Semi-evergreen
    Leaf Color:
    Green
    Leaf Shape:
    Obovate
    Hairs Present:
    Yes
    Leaf Description:
    Leaves are densely white-hairy beneath. The leaflets are broadest beyond the middle and have somewhat rounded tips. The leaves also tend to have a distinctive pleated look to them.
  • Stem:
    Stem Is Aromatic:
    No
  • Landscape:
    Landscape Location:
    Woodland
    Landscape Theme:
    Butterfly Garden
    Edible Garden
    Native Garden
    Pollinator Garden
    Design Feature:
    Border
    Hedge
    Security
    Attracts:
    Butterflies
    Pollinators
    Small Mammals
    Songbirds
    Resistance To Challenges:
    Wet Soil
    Problems:
    Spines/Thorns