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Plants that fill a similar niche:
Rubus allegheniensis Rubus allegheniensis
Rubus canadensis Rubus canadensis
Rubus pensilvanicus Whit flowers (Guilford County, NC)-Mid Spring
Rubus hispidus has some common insect problems:
Raspberry Cane Borer

Rubus hispidus

Phonetic Spelling
ROO-bus HISS-pih-dus
Description

Swamp dewberry is a native perennial shrub in the Rose (Rosaceae) family with branching woody vines and trailing stems up to 8' long. Rather than arching canes, dewberries produce trailing stems that creep along the ground. The stems can root at the tips forming new plants.  It is commonly found in wetland areas, disturbed habitats, forest edges, meadows, fields, and swamps. In NC it is primarily found in the coastal plains and the mountains and is rare in the Piedmont. The stems easily root at the tips forming new plants. 

The flowers of swamp dewberry are visited primarily by bees, including both long-tongued and short-tongued bees. The fruits are eaten by many species of songbirds and mammals. The summer berries have a sour flavor and the plant is generally not cultivated.

Diseases, Insects, and Other Plant Problems: Potential insect problems are cane-boring beetles, leaf beetles, stink bugs, aphids, leafhoppers, treehoppers, katydids, walkingsticks, thrips, the larvae of sawflies, and the larvae of many moths.

More information on Rubus.

See this plant in the following landscape:
Cultivars / Varieties:
Tags:
#shrub#nectar plant#wetlands#squirrel friendly#native garden#edible fruits#pollinator plant#wet soils tolerant#bird friendly#nectar plant late spring#mammals#nectar plant early summer#nectar plant midspring#partial shade tolerant#bee friendly#perennial#wildlife friendly
 
Cultivars / Varieties:
Tags:
#shrub#nectar plant#wetlands#squirrel friendly#native garden#edible fruits#pollinator plant#wet soils tolerant#bird friendly#nectar plant late spring#mammals#nectar plant early summer#nectar plant midspring#partial shade tolerant#bee friendly#perennial#wildlife friendly
  • Attributes:
    Genus:
    Rubus
    Species:
    hispidus
    Family:
    Rosaceae
    Uses (Ethnobotany):
    A dull blue dye can be created from its berries
    Life Cycle:
    Perennial
    Recommended Propagation Strategy:
    Division
    Seed
    Stem Cutting
    Country Or Region Of Origin:
    North America
    Wildlife Value:
    Flowers, fruit, and leaves feed multiple pollinators, birds, and small to large mammals. This plant provides nectar for pollinators.
    Edibility:
    Fruit can be consumed raw or cooked. It can have a sour flavor and is mainly used in preserves.
  • Whole Plant Traits:
    Plant Type:
    Native Plant
    Perennial
    Shrub
    Habit/Form:
    Creeping
    Spreading
    Maintenance:
    Low
    Appendage:
    Prickles
  • Cultural Conditions:
    Light:
    Dappled Sunlight (Shade through upper canopy all day)
    Partial Shade (Direct sunlight only part of the day, 2-6 hours)
    Soil Texture:
    High Organic Matter
    Sand
    Soil pH:
    Acid (<6.0)
    Soil Drainage:
    Occasionally Wet
    NC Region:
    Coastal
    Mountains
    Piedmont
    USDA Plant Hardiness Zone:
    3a, 3b, 4a, 4b, 5a, 5b, 6a, 6b, 7a, 7b
  • Fruit:
    Fruit Color:
    Black
    Purple/Lavender
    Fruit Value To Gardener:
    Edible
    Display/Harvest Time:
    Summer
    Fruit Type:
    Aggregate
    Drupe
    Fruit Length:
    < 1 inch
    Fruit Width:
    < 1 inch
    Fruit Description:
    Fruits start out green, moving to red, and finally dark purple when ripe.
  • Flowers:
    Flower Color:
    White
    Flower Inflorescence:
    Cyme
    Flower Bloom Time:
    Spring
    Summer
    Flower Shape:
    Cup
    Saucer
    Flower Petals:
    4-5 petals/rays
    Flower Size:
    < 1 inch
    Flower Description:
    Each white flower is 1/2-3/4 inches wide with 5 petals, 5 light green sepals united at the base, numerous stamens, and a light green compound pistil at its center. Petals are softly hairy. Blooms from April to June.
  • Leaves:
    Leaf Color:
    Gray/Silver
    Green
    Leaf Type:
    Compound (Pinnately , Bipinnately, Palmately)
    Leaf Arrangement:
    Alternate
    Leaf Shape:
    Obovate
    Ovate
    Leaf Margin:
    Crenate
    Doubly Crenate
    Hairs Present:
    Yes
    Leaf Length:
    1-3 inches
    Leaf Width:
    < 1 inch
    Leaf Description:
    Alternate three-parted (trifolate) compound leaves with coarsely toothed margins and many bristles. The upper leaflet surface is medium green, hairless, and somewhat shiny, while the lower surface is more pale and sometimes softly hairy.
  • Stem:
    Stem Color:
    Green
    Red/Burgundy
    Stem Is Aromatic:
    No
    Stem Bud Scales:
    No scales, covered in hair
    Stem Cross Section:
    Angular
    Stem Surface:
    Hairy (pubescent)
    Stem Description:
    The stems are angular to round, have bristly to soft hars and scattered prickles. They are light green to reddish in color
  • Landscape:
    Landscape Location:
    Naturalized Area
    Pond
    Woodland
    Landscape Theme:
    Edible Garden
    Pollinator Garden
    Attracts:
    Pollinators
    Small Mammals
    Songbirds
    Resistance To Challenges:
    Wet Soil