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Parthenocissus quinquefolia

This plant has poison characteristics. See below.
Common Name(s):
Binewood, Virginia creeper
Cultivar(s):
Engelmann Ivy, Muroru
Categories:
Groundcover, Native Plants, Poisonous Plants, Vines
Comment:

Parthenocissus quinquefolia is a deciduous, woody vine that is commonly called Virginia creeper or woodbine. It is native to eastern and central North America south to Mexico. It is typically located in open areas of ravines, valleys, rich woods, thickets, rocky bluffs, hillsides and fencerows. This is a vigorous tendril-climbing vine that will rapidly grow to 30-50’ long or more. It needs no support because it clings to surfaces (e.g., brick, stone or wood walls) by adhesive holdfasts (also called sucker disks) located at the tendril ends. It also will creep along the ground as suggested by the common name.  Its bark is gray-brown with arial roots and tendrils.  When rapidly growing, the arial roots are bright orange-brown.

This plant is pollution and salt tolerant.  

Regions:  Mountain, Piedmont, Coastal plains

Seasons of Interest: 

  Leaf:  Fall                   Blooms:  Summer            Nut/Fruit/Seed:  Late summer

Wildlife Value:    This plant is moderately resistant to damaged from deer.  Its fruits are eaten by songbirds, squirrels, opossum, racoons, and other mammals.

Insects, Diseases, or Other Plant Problems:  Mildews, leaf spots, canker and wilt are occasional problems for this plant. It is also susceptible to a number of insect pests including beetles, scale and leaf hoppers. Once attached to the side of a building or home, it becomes difficult to remove and will damage painted surfaces and leave residues.

Height:
30-50 ft.
Foliage:
The Virginia creeper has alternate, compound-palmate leaves (usually 5 saw-toothed leaflets, each leaflet to 6” long) that emerge purplish in spring, mature to dull green in summer and change to attractive shades of purple and crimson red in fall.
Flower:
Greenish white flowers appear in late spring to early summer on the upper leaf axils of the Virginia creeper, but are generally hidden by the foliage and are ornamentally insignificant. The flowers give way to blue-black berries (to 3/8” diameter) which are also hidden by the foliage and are often not visible until autumn leaf drop.
Zones:
3-9
Habit:
Deciduous to evergreen
Site:
The Virginia creeper is easily grown in average, medium moisture, well-drained soils in full sun to part shade. It will tolerate full shade. Best fall color generally occurs in sunny locations. This is an easy-to-grow plant with good tolerance for a wide range of soils and urban conditions. It often needs little care, but must be trimmed regularly to keep it in bounds. It should be sited in areas where it will have room to expand and grow. It should not be grown up wood or shingle walls because the holdfasts are difficult to remove. It can ruin painted surfaces. If unchecked, vines can also attach to and seriously damage such objects as gutters, shutters or wiring around homes and buildings.
Texture:
Coarse
Form:
Vine
Exposure:
Sun to partial shade
Fruit:
blue-black berries attract birds
Family:
Vitaceae
Origin:
USA, NC
Distribution:
Throughout
Poison Part:
Berries
Poison Delivery Mode:
Ingestion
Symptoms:
Nausea, abdominal pain, bloody vomiting and diarrhea, dilated pupils, headache, sweating, weak pulse, drowsiness, twitching of face
Toxic Principle:
Oxalic acid and possibly others
Severity:
HIGHLY TOXIC, MAY BE FATAL IF EATEN!
Found in:
Forest or natural area, in woods, fields; weedy in disturbed areas; in landscape cultivated as an ornamental, climbing woody vine
Growth Rate:
Rapid
Climbing Method:
Tendrils with adhesive tips
Tags:
apvg, showy fruit, deciduous, fall color, coastal, salt tolerant, deer resistant

NCCES plant id: 515

Parthenocissus quinquefolia Fall color
Kathleen Moore, CC BY - 2.0
Parthenocissus quinquefolia Fall color leaf close up
Kathleen Moore, CC BY - 2.0
Parthenocissus quinquefolia How the vine looks in the winter
Kathleen Moore, CC BY - 2.0
Parthenocissus quinquefolia Leaves
cultivar413, CC BY - 4.0
Parthenocissus quinquefolia Fall foliage and fruit
jacki-dee, CC BY-NC-ND - 4.0