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Quercus coccinea

This plant has low severity poison characteristics.
See below
Description

Scarlet Oak is a native deciduous tree in the beech family that grows 50 to 80 feet tall and spread between 45 and 60 feet. It is long-lived, durable and easy to grow. It is found in dry upland forests in the Piedmont and middle to lower mountains of NC. The tree prefers acidic sandy soils on the dry side but will tolerate other soils if they are well-drained.

It is often grown for its beautiful fall color and drought tolerance. It is an important source of food for many wildlife species. For an oak, it grows fast and bears acorns in 20 years. Due to thin bark, the tree has low fire resistance. Use as a shade tree or street tree.

Scarlet Oak is so named for its beautiful, red-colored fall leaves. It has fairly smooth grey bark in youth that roughens to a dark brown or black on the trunk of older specimens which can be four feet in diameter. Leaves are more deeply lobed than Quercus rubra but otherwise the trees look very much alike. The crown should be built like many other Oaks with a central trunk and lateral branches well spaced at two of three foot intervals. The rounded, spreading canopy makes the tree well suited for planting along streets. The trunk flares out at the base lifting sidewalks and curbing if planted in tree lawns less than eight feet wide,

Insects, Diseases, or Other Plant Problems:  Leaf spots, anthracnose, canker, mildew, rust, rots, galls, and numerous insect problems have been reported. This tree is highly susceptible to oak wilt.

Cultivars / Varieties:
Tags:
#deciduous#fall color#shade tree#poisonous#wildlife plant#native tree#host plant#fall interest#street tree#host#small mammals#food source#low flammability#NC native#black bears#wild turkeys#deer resistant#blue jays#fire resistant#Braham Arboretum#fantz#food source fall#bird friendly
 
Cultivars / Varieties:
Tags:
#deciduous#fall color#shade tree#poisonous#wildlife plant#native tree#host plant#fall interest#street tree#host#small mammals#food source#low flammability#NC native#black bears#wild turkeys#deer resistant#blue jays#fire resistant#Braham Arboretum#fantz#food source fall#bird friendly
  • Attributes:
    Genus:
    Quercus
    Species:
    coccinea
    Family:
    Fagaceae
    Uses (Ethnobotany):
    Native Americans and pioneers used the acorns for food. Roasted acorns have been ground and used as a coffee substitute.
    Life Cycle:
    Woody
    Recommended Propagation Strategy:
    Seed
    Country Or Region Of Origin:
    Northern Central & Eastern U.S.A
    Distribution:
    AL, AR, CT, DC, DE, GA, IL, IN, KY, MA, MD, ME, MI, MO, MS, NC, NH, NJ, NY, OH, PA, RI, SC, TN, VA, VT, WI, WV.
    Fire Risk Rating:
    high flammability
    Wildlife Value:
    The Scaret oak is a host plant for the Banded Hairstread, Edward's Hairstreak, Grey Hairstreak, White-M Hairstreak, Horace's Duskywing, and Juvenal's Duskywing butterflies.  Acorns are eaten by woodpeckers, blue jays, small mammals, wild turkey, white-tailed deer, and black bear.
    Play Value:
    Wildlife Food Source
    Edibility:
    Acorns can be eaten once to tannins have been leached or boiled out.
    Dimensions:
    Height: 50 ft. 0 in. - 80 ft. 0 in.
    Width: 45 ft. 0 in. - 78 ft. 0 in.
  • Whole Plant Traits:
    Plant Type:
    Native Plant
    Poisonous
    Tree
    Leaf Characteristics:
    Deciduous
    Habit/Form:
    Ascending
    Open
    Pyramidal
    Rounded
    Growth Rate:
    Rapid
    Maintenance:
    Medium
    Texture:
    Medium
  • Cultural Conditions:
    Light:
    Full sun (6 or more hours of direct sunlight a day)
    Partial Shade (Direct sunlight only part of the day, 2-6 hours)
    Soil Texture:
    Clay
    Loam (Silt)
    Sand
    Soil pH:
    Acid (<6.0)
    Soil Drainage:
    Good Drainage
    Occasionally Dry
    Available Space To Plant:
    24-60 feet
    NC Region:
    Coastal
    Mountains
    Piedmont
    Usda Plant Hardiness Zone:
    4a, 4b, 5a, 5b, 6a, 6b, 7a, 7b, 8a, 8b, 9a, 9b
  • Fruit:
    Fruit Color:
    Brown/Copper
    Display/Harvest Time:
    Fall
    Fruit Type:
    Nut
    Fruit Length:
    < 1 inch
    Fruit Description:
    1/2 to 1-inch long acorn occurs singly or in pairs and is half covered by a deep cap. Bitter in taste and require 2 seasons to mature. It starts producing at age 20.
  • Flowers:
    Flower Color:
    Green
    Flower Inflorescence:
    Catkin
    Insignificant
    Flower Bloom Time:
    Spring
    Flower Description:
    Separate male and female flowers in non-showy catkins.
  • Leaves:
    Leaf Characteristics:
    Deciduous
    Leaf Color:
    Gold/Yellow
    Green
    Leaf Feel:
    Glossy
    Leaf Value To Gardener:
    Showy
    Deciduous Leaf Fall Color:
    Red/Burgundy
    Leaf Type:
    Simple
    Leaf Arrangement:
    Alternate
    Leaf Shape:
    Elliptical
    Ovate
    Leaf Margin:
    Lobed
    Hairs Present:
    No
    Leaf Length:
    3-6 inches
    Leaf Width:
    1-3 inches
    Leaf Description:
    The leaves are 3-6 inches long and 2.5- 4.5 inches wide and are a lustrous dark green above and paler below. The deeply cut lobes are bristle-tipped with c-shaped sinuses and 7 pointed lobes. The fall color is scarlet, showy and occurs late.
  • Bark:
    Bark Color:
    Dark Brown
    Dark Gray
    Surface/Attachment:
    Ridges
    Bark Description:
    On young trees, the bark is gray-brown, with smooth streaks. Later becomes darker and develops irregular broad ridges and narrow furrows especially near the base. The inner bark is red to orangish-pink.
  • Stem:
    Stem Color:
    Brown/Copper
    Red/Burgundy
    Stem Is Aromatic:
    No
    Stem Bud Terminal:
    Cluster of terminal buds
    Stem Description:
    Stems are red-brown with multiple terminal reddish-brown buds.
  • Landscape:
    Landscape Location:
    Lawn
    Meadow
    Naturalized Area
    Landscape Theme:
    Butterfly Garden
    Native Garden
    Design Feature:
    Shade Tree
    Specimen
    Street Tree
    Attracts:
    Butterflies
    Small Mammals
    Songbirds
    Resistance To Challenges:
    Black Walnut
    Deer
    Dry Soil
    Problems:
    Frequent Disease Problems
    Frequent Insect Problems
    Poisonous to Humans
  • Poisonous to Humans:
    Poison Severity:
    Low
    Poison Symptoms:
    Stomach pain, constipation and later bloody diarrhea, excessive thirst and urination if young leaves or raw acorns eaten.
    Poison Toxic Principle:
    Gallotannins, quercitrin, and quercitin.
    Causes Contact Dermatitis:
    No
    Poison Part:
    Leaves
    Seeds