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Wild Carrot Daucus carota

Phonetic Spelling
DAW-kus kar-OH-tah
This plant has low severity poison characteristics.
See below
This plant is an invasive species in North Carolina
Description

Queen Anne's Lace is a summer biennial wildflower in the carrot family that was introduced from Europe and is considered invasive in some states including North Carolina. It has naturalized in many states and can be found in sun to partial shade along roadsides, old fields, and waste places.

The 2-4 foot tall umbels of white flowers appear in its second year of growth from mid-summer to mid-fall and have a lacy look. The basal rosette consists of 5-inch long arching leaves with a few leaves occurring alternately up the main stem.

Queen Anne's Lace is very adaptable to soils and pHs and can grow in sun to partial shade. The long taproot makes it difficult to pull up. It is not recommended to grow this plant in the perennial garden as it can spread aggressively.

See this plant in the following landscape:
Cottage Garden
Cultivars / Varieties:
D. carota subsp. sativus
Tags:
#white#sun#invasive#poisonous#partial shade#biennial#weedy#lacy leaves#summer annual weed#summer flowers#agressive#pollinator plant#wildflower garden#warm season weed#butterfly friendly
 
Cultivars / Varieties:
D. carota subsp. sativus
Tags:
#white#sun#invasive#poisonous#partial shade#biennial#weedy#lacy leaves#summer annual weed#summer flowers#agressive#pollinator plant#wildflower garden#warm season weed#butterfly friendly
  • Attributes:
    Genus:
    Daucus
    Species:
    carota
    Family:
    Apiaceae
    Uses (Ethnobotany):
    The plant has been used medicinally.
    Life Cycle:
    Annual
    Biennial
    Recommended Propagation Strategy:
    Seed
    Country Or Region Of Origin:
    Europe, Eastern Asia and northern Africa
    Distribution:
    It is found in the lower 48 states and parts of Canada.
    Edibility:
    Leaves, roots, flowers, and seeds are edible. The young fleshy roots can be cooked or eaten raw, the flower clusters can be french-fried to produce a carrot-flavored dish, the aromatic seed is used as a flavoring in stews, etc. The dried roasted roots are ground into a powder and are used for making coffee.
  • Whole Plant Traits:
    Plant Type:
    Edible
    Poisonous
    Weed
    Wildflower
    Woody Plant Leaf Characteristics:
    Deciduous
    Habit/Form:
    Erect
    Growth Rate:
    Rapid
    Maintenance:
    High
  • Cultural Conditions:
    Light:
    Full sun (6 or more hours of direct sunlight a day)
    Partial Shade (Direct sunlight only part of the day, 2-6 hours)
    Soil Texture:
    Clay
    High Organic Matter
    Loam (Silt)
    Sand
    Shallow Rocky
    Soil pH:
    Acid (<6.0)
    Alkaline (>8.0)
    Neutral (6.0-8.0)
    Soil Drainage:
    Good Drainage
    Moist
    Occasionally Dry
    USDA Plant Hardiness Zone:
    4a, 5a, 5b, 6b, 6a, 7b, 7a, 8b, 8a, 9a, 10a, 10b, 11b, 11a
  • Fruit:
    Fruit Color:
    Brown/Copper
    Fruit Type:
    Achene
    Fruit Length:
    < 1 inch
    Fruit Width:
    < 1 inch
    Fruit Description:
    Small, dry, and ribbed with bristly hairs. The compound umbel of fruits folds inward to form a roundish shape that can be blown by the wind and roll across the ground dropping seeds.
  • Flowers:
    Flower Color:
    Purple/Lavender
    White
    Flower Inflorescence:
    Umbel
    Flower Value To Gardener:
    Edible
    Flower Bloom Time:
    Fall
    Summer
    Flower Size:
    3-6 inches
    Flower Description:
    Umbel of small white flowers in a lacy-looking flat-topped cluster; 3-4 in. wide; deep purple floret in the center
  • Leaves:
    Woody Plant Leaf Characteristics:
    Deciduous
    Leaf Color:
    Green
    Leaf Value To Gardener:
    Edible
    Leaf Type:
    Compound (Pinnately , Bipinnately, Palmately)
    Leaf Arrangement:
    Alternate
    Rosulate
    Leaf Shape:
    Pinnatisect
    Leaf Margin:
    Entire
    Lobed
    Hairs Present:
    No
    Leaf Length:
    3-6 inches
    Leaf Width:
    1-3 inches
    Leaf Description:
    Basal and alternate, 2-pinnately divided and deeply cut into numerous narrow segments.
  • Stem:
    Stem Color:
    Green
    Stem Is Aromatic:
    No
    Stem Surface:
    Hairy (pubescent)
    Stem Description:
    Bristly, hairy stem
  • Landscape:
    Attracts:
    Bees
    Butterflies
    Pollinators
    Problems:
    Invasive Species
    Poisonous to Humans
    Weedy
  • Poisonous to Humans:
    Poison Severity:
    Low
    Poison Symptoms:
    TOXIC ONLY IF LARGE QUANTITIES EATEN. Skin irritation from cell sap and in light.
    Poison Toxic Principle:
    Falcarinol
    Causes Contact Dermatitis:
    Yes
    Poison Part:
    Leaves
    Sap/Juice