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Daucus carota

This plant has poison characteristics. See below.
Common Name(s):
Queen Anne's lace, wild carrot
Categories:
Poisonous Plants, Wildflowers
Comment:

Introduced from Europe

Description:
Erect, biennial herb; leaves basal and alternate, 2-pinnately divided with narrow segments; flowers small, white, in a terminal, umbrella-shaped cluster; fruit small, dry, ribbed, with bristly hairs
Season:
Summer, fall
Height:
1-4 ft.
Foliage:
Bristly hairy stem; leaves are pinnately divided and deeply cut into numerous narrow segments
Flower:
Umbel of small white flowers in a lacy-looking flat-topped cluster; 3-4 in. wide; deep purple floret in the center
Site:
Soil tolerant; sun to partial shade; old fields, roadsides, waste places
Family:
Apiaceae
Origin:
Europe
Distribution:
Throughout
Poison Part:
Leaves
Poison Delivery Mode:
Dermatitis
Symptoms:
Skin irritation from cell sap and in light
Edibility:
EDIBLE PARTS: Leaves, roots, flowers and seeds HARVEST TIME: Only collect plants from areas you know have not been treated with pesticides. Gather leaves during the spring. The roots are collected during the spring. Use flowers during the summer. The small seeds are found during late summer. SAFE HANDLING PROCEDURES: Wash edible parts thoroughly with warm water. Do not use dish detergent or any type of sanitizer. These products can leave a residue. Cook as greens or use fresh in salads. Also, add to stews for seasoning. Parboil for a few minutes, pour off the liquid, and then cook until tender. Leaves can be dried and later added to other foods as seasonings. First-year root growth (those plants not blooming) are tender and are used like domestic carrots. When using older roots, remove the hard core after cooking, and allow the soft pulp and the juices to flavor the other foods cooked. The fresh flower heads can be battered and fried like fritters, or can be used to make jelly. Fill a pot full of fresh flowers, cook for 15 minutes, strain and add "Sure-gel" to the liquid as if making a fruit jelly. Final product is slightly gelled. Gather and use as a seasoning for soups and stews. In addition, the seeds can be used like caraway seeds to top breads.
Toxic Principle:
Falcarinol
Severity:
TOXIC ONLY IF LARGE QUANTITIES EATEN.
Found in:
Weedy in disturbed areas, naturalized in pastures, along roads, fields, and waste places
Life Cycle:
Biennial
Tags:
sun, summer, partial shade, wildflower, poisonous, pollinators, white, butterflies

NCCES plant id: 1027

Daucus carota Daucus carota
Daucus carota Daucus carota