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Laurel Quercus imbricaria

Other Common Name(s):

Phonetic Spelling
KWER-kus im-brik-KAY-ree-a
This plant has low severity poison characteristics.
See below
Description

Shingle Oak is a deciduous tree native to Eastern North America. It has a symmetrical, conical to rounded crown and the leaves are not lobed as many oak trees are. Lower branches are widely spreading or slightly drooping while upper branches are upright. It tolerates a wide range of soil types and prefers well-draining soil. It is not salt tolerant. Makes a good shade or street tree and is mildly deer resistant. 

Strong wood keeps this Oak from suffering storm damage, and it can tolerate drought, acidic soil and full sun.

Insects, Diseases, and Other Plant Problems: Insect pests include scale and two-lined chestnut borer. Oak wilt is a potential disease problem. Galls caused by mites or insects are common, but not harmful.

 

 

 

 

Cultivars / Varieties:
Tags:
#sun#deciduous#fall color#birds#shade tree#poisonous#full sun#wildlife plant#slow growing#native tree#moths#tree#playground#small mammals#food source#NC native#buffer#dry soil tolerant#forest#deer damage#deer resistant#acorns#ornamentals#children's garden#oak#screening#Braham Arboretum#fall food source#larval host plant#dendrology
 
Cultivars / Varieties:
Tags:
#sun#deciduous#fall color#birds#shade tree#poisonous#full sun#wildlife plant#slow growing#native tree#moths#tree#playground#small mammals#food source#NC native#buffer#dry soil tolerant#forest#deer damage#deer resistant#acorns#ornamentals#children's garden#oak#screening#Braham Arboretum#fall food source#larval host plant#dendrology
  • Attributes:
    Genus:
    Quercus
    Species:
    imbricaria
    Family:
    Fagaceae
    Uses (Ethnobotany):
    Early North American settlers used this tree to make roof shingles.
    Life Cycle:
    Perennial
    Woody
    Recommended Propagation Strategy:
    Seed
    Country Or Region Of Origin:
    Iowa south to Louisiana, east to North Carolina, and north to Ma
    Distribution:
    AL , AR , DC , DE , GA , IA , IL , IN , KS , KY , LA , MA , MD , MI , MO , MS , NC , NJ , NY , OH , OK , PA , TN , VA , WV. Found from a few eastern states through the midwest.
    Wildlife Value:
    Very high wildlife value. Many birds and mammals eat the acorns. It is a host plant to several moths and skippers. Many insects are attracted to the tree, which in turn provides food for birds and other insect-eating animals.
    Play Value:
    Buffer
    Screening
    Wildlife Food Source
    Edibility:
    Acorns (nuts) are edible after tannins are leached or boiled out.
    Dimensions:
    Height: 50 ft. 0 in. - 70 ft. 0 in.
    Width: 50 ft. 0 in. - 60 ft. 0 in.
  • Whole Plant Traits:
    Plant Type:
    Native Plant
    Poisonous
    Tree
    Leaf Characteristics:
    Deciduous
    Habit/Form:
    Broad
    Conical
    Erect
    Rounded
    Growth Rate:
    Slow
    Maintenance:
    Medium
    Texture:
    Medium
  • Cultural Conditions:
    Light:
    Full sun (6 or more hours of direct sunlight a day)
    Partial Shade (Direct sunlight only part of the day, 2-6 hours)
    Soil Texture:
    Clay
    Loam (Silt)
    Sand
    Soil pH:
    Acid (<6.0)
    Neutral (6.0-8.0)
    Soil Drainage:
    Good Drainage
    Moist
    Occasionally Dry
    Occasionally Wet
    NC Region:
    Mountains
    Piedmont
    Usda Plant Hardiness Zone:
    4a, 4b, 5a, 5b, 6a, 6b, 7a, 7b, 8a, 8b
  • Fruit:
    Fruit Color:
    Brown/Copper
    Display/Harvest Time:
    Fall
    Fruit Type:
    Nut
    Fruit Length:
    < 1 inch
    Fruit Width:
    < 1 inch
    Fruit Description:
    The round acorn is 0.5 to 0.75 inches with thin scaley cups covering about 1/3 of the nut. It does not mature until the second year.
  • Flowers:
    Flower Color:
    Gold/Yellow
    Green
    Flower Inflorescence:
    Catkin
    Insignificant
    Spike
    Flower Bloom Time:
    Spring
    Flower Description:
    Yellow-green male flowers are in drooping, elongated clusters. Female flowers are in spikes
  • Leaves:
    Leaf Characteristics:
    Deciduous
    Leaf Color:
    Green
    Leaf Feel:
    Glossy
    Leathery
    Leaf Value To Gardener:
    Edible
    Deciduous Leaf Fall Color:
    Brown/Copper
    Gold/Yellow
    Red/Burgundy
    Leaf Type:
    Simple
    Leaf Arrangement:
    Alternate
    Leaf Shape:
    Elliptical
    Lanceolate
    Oblong
    Leaf Margin:
    Entire
    Hairs Present:
    Yes
    Leaf Length:
    3-6 inches
    Leaf Width:
    1-3 inches
    Leaf Description:
    Leaves are 3 to 6 inches long and 3/4 to 2 inches wide, glossy green with paler, sometimes pubescent undersides and they often persist into winter. Fall color is variable from yellow-brown to russet red. Broadly lance-shaped and unlobed with a single terminal bristle tip.
  • Bark:
    Bark Color:
    Dark Brown
    Dark Gray
    Light Gray
    Surface/Attachment:
    Ridges
    Bark Description:
    Greyish-brown bark with shallow fissures and ridges with age. Pinkish inner bark.
  • Stem:
    Stem Color:
    Brown/Copper
    Stem Is Aromatic:
    No
    Stem Buds:
    Hairy tips
    Stem Bud Terminal:
    Only 1 terminal bud, larger than side buds
    Stem Bud Scales:
    Enclosed in more than 2 scales
    Stem Lenticels:
    Not Conspicuous
    Stem Description:
    Branch bark is gray and more smooth, while twigs are brown and glabrous with scattered lenticels.
  • Landscape:
    Landscape Location:
    Lawn
    Meadow
    Recreational Play Area
    Landscape Theme:
    Children's Garden
    Drought Tolerant Garden
    Edible Garden
    Native Garden
    Design Feature:
    Shade Tree
    Specimen
    Street Tree
    Attracts:
    Small Mammals
    Songbirds
    Resistance To Challenges:
    Black Walnut
    Deer
    Drought
    Dry Soil
    Wet Soil
    Problems:
    Messy
    Poisonous to Humans
  • Poisonous to Humans:
    Poison Severity:
    Low
    Poison Symptoms:
    Stomach pain, constipation and later bloody diarrhea, excessive thirst and urination.
    Poison Toxic Principle:
    Gallotannins, quercitrin, and quercitin.
    Causes Contact Dermatitis:
    No
    Poison Part:
    Fruits
    Leaves