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Rhus typhina

Common Name(s):
Staghorn sumac
Cultivar(s):
Laciniata , Dissecta , Dissecta, Lancinata, Lancinata
Categories:
Native Plants, Shrubs, Trees
Comment:

Medium green leaves turn red, yellow, orange, scarlet, and red velvet in fall.  You can rejuvenate it by cutting to the ground every few years.  It is not poisonous thought it can be weedy spreading by suckers to form colonies. It naturally occurs in the western part of North Carolina.  It is drought tolerant.  Its showy white blooms appear in the spring and summer and are followed by equally showy red berries.

Wildlife Value: Flowers provide a nectar source to native bees.  Fruits are enjoyed by birds.

Height:
15-25 ft.
Foliage:
Alternate, compound pinnate bright green leaves; 13 to 27 leaflets; yellow, orange, scarlet and red velvet fall color
Flower:
4 to 8 in. panicles of greenish white flowers in summer; velvety red fruit in late summer on female plants lasting into spring
Zones:
3-9
Habit:
Deciduous
Site:
Sun to partial shade; range of soil types including rocky soil. Does not tolerate shade or wet soil
Texture:
Medium
Form:
Loose, open spreading shrub to small tree; picturesque branches in winter
Exposure:
Sun to partial shade; range of soil types; does not tolerate shade or wet soil
Fruit:
Greenish white flowers; velvety red fruit in late summer on female plants lasting into spring
Width:
15-25 ft.
Growth Rate:
Rapid
Leaf:
12 to 24 in. alternate, compound leaves with 13 to 27 leaflets; red, yellow, orange, scarlet, and red velvet fall color
Tags:
showy flowers, deciduous, bees, fall color, birds, nectar, wildlife, fall interest, showy berries, food

NCCES plant id: 545

Rhus typhina Rhus typhina
Kent McFarland, CC BY-NC-2.0
Rhus typhina Rhus typhina
Scott Zona, CC BY-NC-2.0
Rhus typhina Rhus typhina
Scott Zona, CC BY-NC-2.0
Rhus typhina Rhus typhina
Scott Zona , CC BY-NC-2.0
Rhus typhina Rhus typhina
Aaron Carlson, CC-BY-SA-2.0
Rhus typhina Rhus typhina
InAweOfGod'sCreation, CC BY - 2.0