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Callirhoe bushii is often confused with:
Callirhoe digitata Blooms and stems
Callirhoe involucrata Callirhoe involucrata
Native alternative(s) for Callirhoe bushii:
Trillium catesbaei T. catesbaei
Viola macloskeyi Viola macloskeyi
Plants that fill a similar niche:
Callirhoe digitata Blooms and stems
Allium giganteum Plant
Trillium catesbaei T. catesbaei
Callirhoe bushii has some common disease problems:
Phytophthora Root and Crown Rot in the Landscape

Mallow Callirhoe bushii

Other plants called Mallow:

Previously known as:

  • Callirhoe involucrata var. bushii
  • Callirhoe papaver var. bushii
Phonetic Spelling
kal-ir-OH-ee BUSH-ee-eye
Description

Bush's Poppy Mallow, is a rare herbaceous biennial/perennial that is drought tolerant and has beautiful poppy-like magenta flowers. It is native to the Southern United States and is typically found in open woods and ravine bottoms. There are 11 species of of Callirhoe that have been described, but Bush's Poppy Mallow is very rare.  It is uncommon in the wild, but plants and seeds are available in some nurseries. The Genus name, Callrihoe, represents the daughter of a minor Greek river god, Achelous. This species honors the botanist who discovered the plant, Benjamin Franklin Bush. 

Bush's Poppy Mallow grows easily in dry to medium moisture well-drained soil. Good drainage is required so avoid humusy or clay soils. Bush's Poppy Mallow has a stout thick root making it difficult to transplant. Once the plant is established it should not be disturbed because of its root system.  It prefers full sun but tolerates partial shade, moderate to dry conditions, and well-drained soil. In nature, the plant will avoid acidic soils. The plant propagates by seed, which requires 30 days of cold stratification to germinate, but will also self-seed in the garden if conditions are good. It should be planted in the fall and is not frost tender. The plant provides good ground cover in dry areas and can trail over a stone wall.

Diseases, Insects, and Other Plant Problems:

Bush's Poppy Mallow has no serious insect problems, but it can develop crown rot if the soil is poorly drained.

See this plant in the following landscape:
Cultivars / Varieties:
Tags:
#drought tolerant#perennial#ornamentals#herbaceous perennial#taproot#native#flowering
 
Cultivars / Varieties:
Tags:
#drought tolerant#perennial#ornamentals#herbaceous perennial#taproot#native#flowering
  • Attributes:
    Genus:
    Callirhoe
    Species:
    bushii
    Family:
    Malvaceae
    Life Cycle:
    Perennial
    Recommended Propagation Strategy:
    Seed
    Country Or Region Of Origin:
    Southern United States
    Distribution:
    Native to Arkansas, Kansas, Missouri, and Oklahoma. It is found in the Ozark Plateaus, Ouachita Mountains, and Cherokee Plains.
    Fire Risk Rating:
    low flammability
    Wildlife Value:
    Provides nectar and is pollinated by butterflies, bees, and hummingbirds.
    Particularly Resistant To (Insects/Diseases/Other Problems):
    drought
    Edibility:
    When grown on nitrogen rich soils (and particularly when these are cultivated inorganically), the plant tends to concentrate high levels of nitrates in its leaves. The leaves are perfectly wholesome otherwise. Avoid with gallstones.
    Dimensions:
    Height: 1 ft. 0 in. - 2 ft. 0 in.
    Width: 1 ft. 0 in. - 2 ft. 0 in.
  • Whole Plant Traits:
    Plant Type:
    Herbaceous Perennial
    Perennial
    Wildflower
    Habit/Form:
    Cascading
    Creeping
    Erect
    Spreading
    Growth Rate:
    Rapid
    Maintenance:
    Low
  • Cultural Conditions:
    Light:
    Full sun (6 or more hours of direct sunlight a day)
    Partial Shade (Direct sunlight only part of the day, 2-6 hours)
    Soil Texture:
    Loam (Silt)
    Sand
    Shallow Rocky
    Soil pH:
    Alkaline (>8.0)
    Neutral (6.0-8.0)
    Soil Drainage:
    Good Drainage
    Available Space To Plant:
    12 inches-3 feet
    USDA Plant Hardiness Zone:
    4b, 4a, 5b, 5a, 6b, 6a, 7b, 7a, 8a, 8b
  • Fruit:
    Fruit Color:
    Black
    Brown/Copper
    Display/Harvest Time:
    Fall
    Fruit Type:
    Capsule
    Schizocarp
    Fruit Length:
    < 1 inch
    Fruit Width:
    < 1 inch
    Fruit Description:
    The seed head forms into a flat ring and has seed capsules around the center. Each seed capsule contains a single seed. The seeds are very dark brown to black in color and kidney-shaped. The seed typically falls near the plant and are not typically wind blown.
  • Flowers:
    Flower Color:
    Pink
    Purple/Lavender
    Flower Inflorescence:
    Solitary
    Flower Value To Gardener:
    Showy
    Flower Bloom Time:
    Summer
    Flower Shape:
    Cup
    Flower Petals:
    4-5 petals/rays
    Flower Size:
    1-3 inches
    Flower Description:
    The flower is brightly magenta colored with 5 wedge-shaped, overlapping petals which form into a cup. The base of the cup is white and there is a central column of stamens. Below the cup-like flower are 5 hairy pointed, green sepals shorter than the petals. On the flower stalk below the cup-like petals are 3 hairy green bracts shorter than the petals. Blooms from early to late summer.
  • Leaves:
    Leaf Color:
    Green
    Leaf Type:
    Compound (Pinnately , Bipinnately, Palmately)
    Leaf Arrangement:
    Alternate
    Leaf Shape:
    Palmasect
    Leaf Margin:
    Dentate
    Lobed
    Hairs Present:
    Yes
    Leaf Length:
    1-3 inches
    Leaf Width:
    3-6 inches
    Leaf Description:
    The leaves are divided palmately or hand-shaped with 5 to 7 lobes. The blades are up to 1-3 inches long and 5 inches long. The lower leaves on the stem have the most divisions, and the larger lobes have teeth-like indentations on the tips of the lobes. The stem leaves gradually appear smaller in size with fewer lobes (3-5 lobes) and have fewer teeth-like indentations as they ascend the stem. The leaves are on long, hairy stalks.
  • Stem:
    Stem Color:
    Green
    Stem Is Aromatic:
    No
    Stem Surface:
    Hairy (pubescent)
    Stem Description:
    The stems are green with greenish white hairs, weakly erect, rambling, and creeping. The plant may spread through the garden, but it does not root at the stem nodes.
  • Landscape:
    Landscape Location:
    Meadow
    Naturalized Area
    Rock Wall
    Landscape Theme:
    Drought Tolerant Garden
    Native Garden
    Pollinator Garden
    Rock Garden
    Design Feature:
    Border
    Attracts:
    Bees
    Butterflies
    Hummingbirds
    Pollinators
    Resistance To Challenges:
    Drought
    Dry Soil