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Quercus rubra

This plant has poison characteristics. See below.
Common Name(s):
Northern Red oak, Red oak
Categories:
Native Plants, Poisonous Plants, Trees
Comment:

Quercus rubra, commonly called red oak or northern red oak, is a medium-sized, deciduous tree with a rounded to broad-spreading, often irregular crown. It typically grows at a moderate-to-fast rate to a height of 50-75' (often larger in the wild).  The bark is smooth on young stems.  As the tree ages, wide, flat-topped ridges and shallow furrows develop.  The shallow furrows form a pattern resembling ski tracts. 

This tree may have various shapes, depending on the species.

It produces pollen flowers in drooping, elongated clusters.

Regions:   Mountains, Piedmont

Seasons of Interest: 

     Leaves:  Fall       Bloom:  Spring     Fruit/Seed/Nut:  Fall

Wildlife Value:  The Red Oak is a host plant for the Banded Hairstreak, Edward's Hairstreak, Gray Hairstreak, White-M Hairstreak, Horace's Duskywing and the Juvenal's Duskywing butterflies.  The acorns are eaten by woodpeckers, blue jays small mammals, wild turkeys white-tailed deer and black bears.  It is also moderately deer resistant.

Insects, Diseases, or Other Plant Problems:  The Red oak tree is a durable and long-lived tree. Susceptible to oak wilt which is a systemic fungal disease that has no cure. Chlorosis (yellowing of the leaves while the veins remain green) often occurs when soils are not sufficiently acidic.

 

 

Height:
60-75 ft.
Flower:
The Insignificant flowers of the Red oak appear in separate male and female catkins in the spring. The fruits are acorns (with flat, saucer-shaped cups) which mature in early fall. An abundant crop of acorns may not occur before this tree reaches 40 years old.
Zones:
4-8
Habit:
Deciduous
Site:
The Red oak grows best in average, dry to medium moisture, acidic soil in full sun. It prefers fertile, sandy, finely-textured soils with good drainage.
Texture:
Medium
Form:
Rounded; symmetrical; flat top with age
Exposure:
Sun, light shade
Fruit:
Acorn
Family:
Fagaceae
Poison Part:
Acorns (seeds of nuts) and young leaves.
Poison Delivery Mode:
Ingestion.
Symptoms:
Stomach pain, constipation and later bloody diarrhea, excessive thirst and urination
Edibility:
EDIBLE PARTS: Acorns (nuts) are edible after tannins are leached or boiled out. HARVEST TIME: Only collect nutsfrom areas you kn
Toxic Principle:
Gallotannins, quercitrin, and quercitin.
Severity:
CAUSES ONLY LOW TOXICITY IF EATEN.
Found in:
Forest or natural areas; landscape as ornamental and shade trees.
Width:
60-75 ft.
Growth Rate:
Rapid
Leaf:
The leaves of the Red oak are alternate, simple, dark, lustrous green leaves (grayish-white beneath) with 7-11, toothed lobes which are sharply pointed at the tips. The leaves turn brownish-red in autumn.
Tags:
deciduous, fall color, specimen, street tree, birds, lawn tree, butterflies, host, deer resistant

NCCES plant id: 2178

Quercus rubra Quercus rubra
pverdonk, CC BY-NC - 4.0
Quercus rubra Quercus rubra
Marcin Bajer, CC BY-NC - 4.0
Quercus rubra Quercus rubra
Dan Mullen, CC BY-NC-ND - 4.0
Quercus rubra Quercus rubra
Maggie, CC BY-NC - 4.0
Quercus rubra Quercus rubra
Wendy Cutler, CC BY - 4.0
Quercus rubra Quercus rubra
JohnPickenPhoto, CC BY - 4.0
Quercus rubra Quercus rubra
Katja Schulz, CC BY - 4.0
Quercus rubra Quercus rubra
Plant Image Library, CC BY - 4.0
Quercus rubra Quercus rubra
Eli Sagor, CC BY-NC - 4.0
Quercus rubra Buds, small and hairless
Bruce Kirchoff, CC-BY-SA-3.0