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Achillea millefolium is often confused with:
Tanacetum vulgare Tanacetum vulgare
Plants that fill a similar niche:
Asclepias tuberosa Asclepias tuberosa
Lantana camara Lantana camara flower
Allium Alllium

Thousandleaf Achillea millefolium

Other plants called Thousandleaf:

Phonetic Spelling
ak-ih-LEE-ah mill-ee-FOH-lee-um
This plant has low severity poison characteristics.
See below
Description

Introduced to America from Europe in colonial times, this perennial prefers well-drained soil and full sun.  It is often found naturalizing in fields and along roadsides.  It is a wonderful wildlife plant that attracts butterflies.   Makes excellent cut or dried arrangements. Very easy to divide.  This plant is moderately salt tolerant. Plants can spread aggressively by rhizomes and they self-seed regularly.  After initial bloom, it can be dead-headed back to a lateral flower bud to encourage rebloom.  Generally considered too weedy to use in borders but works well as a flowering ground cover in meadows, prairies, and naturalized areas. It can even be a lawn alternative in sunny areas with little foot traffic. It can be unattractive by the end of summer after it blooms and can be pruned back severely or mowed with a rotary mower on the highest setting in naturalized areas.  Large clumps should be divided as necessary to maintain healthy and vigorous growth and performance and reduce disease.  Cultivars cover a range of flower colors including pinks, reds, creams, yellows and bicolor pastels.  Hybrid varieties have been bred for stronger stems and a more erect habit.

The finely divided, pinnatifid to decompoundly pinnatifid, leaves give the plant a soft fern-like texture, making it attractive even when the erect flowering branches are not in season; bloom is from mid to late summer, into early fall. It has a tendency to spread in beds.

Family name Asteraceae (Compositae)

Insects, Diseases, and Other Plant Problems:  Stem rot, powdery mildew are rare.  Stems can be weak. Wind and rain can flatten plantings, spreads aggressively.

Quick ID Hints:

  • Leaves pinnatifid, fern-like in appearance.
  • Inflorescence terminal, small heads in dense umbel.
See this plant in the following landscapes:
Poolside Garden Herb & Flower Cottage Garden Pollinator Garden- Partial Shade Sea of Daylilies Backyard Planting Crevice Garden, Guilford County
Cultivars / Varieties:
  • 'Galaxy'
    Galaxy series is available in a variety of colors, other parent is A. Taygetea
  • 'Moonshine'
    Silver/grey/green foliage with lemon-yellow flowers; other parent is Egyptian yarrow
  • 'New Vintage Rose'
  • 'Paprika'
    Brick red flowers with yellow centers
  • 'Peachy Seduction'
    Peachy-pink Color
  • 'Red Velvet'
    Fade resistant red flowers
  • 'Salmon Beauty'
    Salmon-pink flowers that fade to creamy yellow
'Galaxy', 'Moonshine', 'New Vintage Rose', 'Paprika', 'Peachy Seduction', 'Red Velvet', 'Salmon Beauty'
Tags:
#bees#fragrant#red#white#sun#yellow#poisonous#partial shade#perennial#white flowers#wildlife plant#pink flowers#red flowers#yellow flowers#weedy#fragrant leaves#nectar plant#cut flowers#salt tolerant#lawn alternative#medicinal#cottage garden#meadow#herb garden#ncemgva2018#cpp#summer flowers#naturalizes#spring interest#pollinator plant#wildflower garden#fantz#edible#groundcovers that can be mowed#problem for cats#problem for dogs#problem for horses#stormwater demo garden orange co
 
Cultivars / Varieties:
  • 'Galaxy'
    Galaxy series is available in a variety of colors, other parent is A. Taygetea
  • 'Moonshine'
    Silver/grey/green foliage with lemon-yellow flowers; other parent is Egyptian yarrow
  • 'New Vintage Rose'
  • 'Paprika'
    Brick red flowers with yellow centers
  • 'Peachy Seduction'
    Peachy-pink Color
  • 'Red Velvet'
    Fade resistant red flowers
  • 'Salmon Beauty'
    Salmon-pink flowers that fade to creamy yellow
'Galaxy', 'Moonshine', 'New Vintage Rose', 'Paprika', 'Peachy Seduction', 'Red Velvet', 'Salmon Beauty'
Tags:
#bees#fragrant#red#white#sun#yellow#poisonous#partial shade#perennial#white flowers#wildlife plant#pink flowers#red flowers#yellow flowers#weedy#fragrant leaves#nectar plant#cut flowers#salt tolerant#lawn alternative#medicinal#cottage garden#meadow#herb garden#ncemgva2018#cpp#summer flowers#naturalizes#spring interest#pollinator plant#wildflower garden#fantz#edible#groundcovers that can be mowed#problem for cats#problem for dogs#problem for horses#stormwater demo garden orange co
  • Attributes:
    Genus:
    Achillea
    Species:
    millefolium
    Family:
    Asteraceae
    Uses (Ethnobotany):
    Used for medicinal purposes by Native Americans to break a fever, soothe a rash, or treat hemorrhaging or stomach aches. The genus was named for the Greek Trojan War hero, Achilles, who was said to use this plant to treat his wounded soldiers.
    Life Cycle:
    Perennial
    Recommended Propagation Strategy:
    Division
    Seed
    Country Or Region Of Origin:
    Europe, western Asia, North America, garden hybrids
    Fire Risk Rating:
    low flammability
    Wildlife Value:
    Attracts butterflies and bees.
    Play Value:
    Attracts Pollinators
    Easy to Grow
    Edibility:
    Leaves are bitter, but can be eaten raw or cooked. To make a tea, soak leaves in warm water to remove dirt and debris. Do not use dish detergent or any type of sanitizer. These products can leave a residue. Chop leaves and steep in hot water for 10 minutes. Drink as a tea. SOURCE: Crowhurst, A. 1972. The Weed Cookbook. Lancer Books, Inc. New York, 190 pp.
    Dimensions:
    Height: 1 ft. 0 in. - 3 ft. 0 in.
    Width: 1 ft. 0 in. - 3 ft. 10 in.
  • Whole Plant Traits:
    Plant Type:
    Ground Cover
    Herb
    Herbaceous Perennial
    Perennial
    Poisonous
    Wildflower
    Woody Plant Leaf Characteristics:
    Deciduous
    Habit/Form:
    Erect
    Prostrate
    Spreading
    Growth Rate:
    Rapid
    Maintenance:
    Low
    Medium
    Texture:
    Fine
  • Cultural Conditions:
    Light:
    Full sun (6 or more hours of direct sunlight a day)
    Soil Texture:
    High Organic Matter
    Loam (Silt)
    Sand
    Soil pH:
    Neutral (6.0-8.0)
    Soil Drainage:
    Good Drainage
    Occasionally Dry
    Occasionally Wet
    Available Space To Plant:
    12 inches-3 feet
    NC Region:
    Coastal
    Mountains
    Piedmont
    USDA Plant Hardiness Zone:
    3a, 3b, 4a, 4b, 5b, 5a, 6a, 6b, 7a, 7b, 8a, 8b, 9a, 9b
  • Flowers:
    Flower Color:
    Cream/Tan
    Gold/Yellow
    Orange
    Pink
    Purple/Lavender
    Red/Burgundy
    White
    Flower Inflorescence:
    Corymb
    Head
    Umbel
    Flower Value To Gardener:
    Good Cut
    Good Dried
    Long Bloom Season
    Long-lasting
    Showy
    Flower Bloom Time:
    Summer
    Flower Petals:
    4-5 petals/rays
    Flower Size:
    < 1 inch
    Flower Description:
    June to September numerous long-lasting tiny flowers in corymbs. Minute; ray flowers white, red to pink, yellow; more
  • Leaves:
    Woody Plant Leaf Characteristics:
    Deciduous
    Leaf Color:
    Gray/Silver
    Green
    Leaf Feel:
    Soft
    Leaf Value To Gardener:
    Edible
    Fragrant
    Good Dried
    Leaf Type:
    Compound (Pinnately , Bipinnately, Palmately)
    Simple
    Leaf Arrangement:
    Alternate
    Rosulate
    Leaf Shape:
    Lanceolate
    Oblong
    Leaf Margin:
    Lobed
    Hairs Present:
    Yes
    Leaf Length:
    1-3 inches
    Leaf Width:
    < 1 inch
    Leaf Description:
    Narrowly oblong to lance-shaped aromatic with a strong spicy aroma. Deeply divided fern-like, medium green foliage. In a basal rosette with cauline leaves alternate, simple, pinnatifid and deeply divided, petioles elongate on lower leaves to sessile on upper leaves.
  • Stem:
    Stem Color:
    Green
    Stem Is Aromatic:
    Yes
    Stem Buds:
    Hairy
  • Landscape:
    Landscape Location:
    Lawn
    Meadow
    Naturalized Area
    Rock Wall
    Landscape Theme:
    Butterfly Garden
    Cottage Garden
    Drought Tolerant Garden
    Garden for the Blind
    Pollinator Garden
    Rock Garden
    Design Feature:
    Border
    Mass Planting
    Attracts:
    Bees
    Butterflies
    Pollinators
    Resistance To Challenges:
    Deer
    Drought
    Dry Soil
    Heat
    Humidity
    Pollution
    Salt
    Problems:
    Contact Dermatitis
    Poisonous to Humans
    Problem for Cats
    Problem for Dogs
    Problem for Horses
    Weedy
  • Poisonous to Humans:
    Poison Severity:
    Low
    Poison Symptoms:
    Increased urination, vomiting, diarrhea, dermatitis, depression, anorexia, hypersalivation.
    Poison Toxic Principle:
    Achilleine, alkaloids, monoterpenes, sesquiterpene lactones
    Causes Contact Dermatitis:
    Yes
    Poison Part:
    Flowers
    Leaves