Plant DetailShow Menu

Plants that fill a similar niche:
Narcissus A field of daffodils taken in Hurley Park, Salisbury, NC
Dianthus barbatus Dianthus barbatus
Iris reticulata Flowers
Tulipa has some common insect problems:
Slugs and Snails Found on Flowers and Foliage
Tulipa has some common disease problems:
Tulip Aphid

Tulip Tulipa

Phonetic Spelling
TOO-li-pa
This plant has low severity poison characteristics.
See below
Description

Tulipa, or the common Tulip, is a bulbous perennial herb that blooms in mid- to late spring with flowers in with all solid or mixed colors except true blue. You can grow tulips in organically rich, fertile, medium moisture, well-drained soils in full sun. They grow best in areas with cool, moist winters and warm dry summers. and are typically grown in mass plantings.

The common garden tulip as well as a vast array of complex hybrid cultivars are commonly planted for their spring flowers. Over 3500 names applied to tulips are currently listed. Taxonomic difficulties abound in Tulipa due to their long-established cultivation, hybridization, and selection. Tulips are generally organized into 15 divisions based upon flower shape and origin; for example, the Single Early Group with single, cup-shaped flowers blooming in early spring, Single Late Group with single, cup/goblet-shaped flowers blooming in late spring, the Parrot Group with single, cup-shaped, late spring flowers with fringed and ruffled tepals, and many others. 

To grow from bulbs, plant bulbs 4 to 6 inches deep (or three times the depth of the bulb) in fall. In heavy clay soils, a slightly shallower depth is best. Space bulbs 2 to 5 inches apart depending on plant size. Tulips may be grown as perennials or as annuals, although species tulips often perform better than hybrid plants as perennials. When growing tulips as perennials, promptly remove spent flower stems after bloom to prevent seeding, but do not remove foliage until it yellows. In most cases, tulip performance declines substantially starting with the second year. Many growers prefer growing tulips, particularly hybrids, as annuals.

Diseases, Insects, and Other Plant Problems:

Tulip break virus causes white or greenish streaks in perianth color. The plant is intolerant to heat loads and loses floral vigor when soil temperatures reach 70 degrees. Bulb and root rots may occur, particularly in wet, poorly drained soils. Gray mold. Mosaic virus may also occur. Animal pests include aphids, slugs and snails. Mice and voles are attracted to the bulbs. Squirrels may dig up newly planted bulbs.

 

VIDEO Created by Elisabeth Meyer for "Edibles, Bulbs, and Houseplants" a plant identification course offered in partnership with Longwood Gardens.   

Profile Video:
See this plant in the following landscapes:
Cottage Garden Perennial Border Border Garden, Upcycled Davidson County Demo Garden
Cultivars / Varieties:
T. fosteriana, T. greigii, T. kaufmanniana, Tulip hybrids
Tags:
#showy flowers#houseplant#colorful#interiorscape#mass planting#cpp#Tunicated bulb#spring flowering bulbs#HS302#problem for cats#ebh#problem for dogs#problem for horses#ebh-g
 
Cultivars / Varieties:
T. fosteriana, T. greigii, T. kaufmanniana, Tulip hybrids
Tags:
#showy flowers#houseplant#colorful#interiorscape#mass planting#cpp#Tunicated bulb#spring flowering bulbs#HS302#problem for cats#ebh#problem for dogs#problem for horses#ebh-g
  • Attributes:
    Genus:
    Tulipa
    Family:
    Liliaceae
    Life Cycle:
    Annual
    Bulb
    Perennial
    Recommended Propagation Strategy:
    Division
    Country Or Region Of Origin:
    Southern Europe to Central Asia
    Distribution:
    widely naturalized
    Edibility:
    The edible flowers have a vegetable flavor like lettuce, fresh peas or cucumber. The bulbs can be toxic, but were reported to be cooked and eaten during times of war and starvation.
    Dimensions:
    Height: 0 ft. 4 in. - 2 ft. 4 in.
    Width: 0 ft. 6 in. - 0 ft. 9 in.
  • Whole Plant Traits:
    Plant Type:
    Annual
    Bulb
    Perennial
    Poisonous
    Habit/Form:
    Erect
    Growth Rate:
    Rapid
    Maintenance:
    Low
  • Cultural Conditions:
    Light:
    Full sun (6 or more hours of direct sunlight a day)
    Soil Texture:
    High Organic Matter
    Soil Drainage:
    Good Drainage
    Available Space To Plant:
    Less than 12 inches
    NC Region:
    Coastal
    Mountains
    Piedmont
    USDA Plant Hardiness Zone:
    3a, 3b, 4b, 4a, 5b, 5a, 6b, 6a, 7a, 7b, 8b, 8a
  • Fruit:
    Fruit Type:
    Capsule
    Fruit Description:
    Fruits capsular, ellipsoid to subglobose, 3-angled, leathery, dehiscence loculicidal. Many seeds in 2 rows per locule, flat.
  • Flowers:
    Flower Color:
    Cream/Tan
    Gold/Yellow
    Orange
    Pink
    Purple/Lavender
    Variegated
    Flower Inflorescence:
    Raceme
    Flower Value To Gardener:
    Edible
    Good Cut
    Showy
    Flower Bloom Time:
    Spring
    Flower Shape:
    Cup
    Star
    Flower Petals:
    6 petals/rays
    Colored Sepals
    Tepals
    Flower Size:
    1-3 inches
    Flower Description:
    Flowers are usually solitary, erect, campanulate to cup-shaped, color and shape (cup, bowl, star) vary with cultivar or species; tepals 6, free, in two whorls, often blotched. Anthers are most commonly black, though sometimes yellow.
  • Leaves:
    Leaf Color:
    Blue
    Green
    Leaf Feel:
    Waxy
    Leaf Type:
    Simple
    Leaf Arrangement:
    Alternate
    Leaf Shape:
    Lanceolate
    Linear
    Ovate
    Leaf Margin:
    Entire
    Undulate
    Hairs Present:
    No
    Leaf Length:
    > 6 inches
    Leaf Width:
    1-3 inches
    Leaf Description:
    Leaves are widely straplike, clasping, and can be glabrous or glaucous, sometimes undulate or crispate.
  • Stem:
    Stem Is Aromatic:
    No
    Stem Form:
    Straight
    Stem Description:
    Geophyte with erect stems and clasping leaves.
  • Landscape:
    Landscape Location:
    Container
    Houseplants
    Landscape Theme:
    Cutting Garden
    Design Feature:
    Border
    Mass Planting
    Resistance To Challenges:
    Black Walnut
    Problems:
    Problem for Cats
    Problem for Dogs
    Problem for Horses
  • Poisonous to Humans:
    Poison Severity:
    Low
    Poison Symptoms:
    Ingestion can cause stomach pain, salivation, depression, diarrhea, sweating, nausea, vomiting. Skin contact can cause an alergic reaction resulting in irritation with tingling, redness, blisters, and cracks, either immediately or after a delay from contact, and may spread away from the point of contact. Highest concentration of toxin in bulb.
    Poison Toxic Principle:
    Tulipalin, a phytoalexin; allergins; glycoprotein.
    Causes Contact Dermatitis:
    Yes
    Poison Part:
    Flowers
    Leaves
    Roots