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Quercus lyrata

This plant has poison characteristics. See below.
Common Name(s):
Overcup oak
Categories:
Native Plants, Poisonous Plants, Trees
Comment:

Native oak tree in the Fagaceae family. It tolerates wet sites. 

Wildlife Value:  This tree is mildly resistant to damage by deer.

Insects, Diseases, and Other Plant Problems: Oaks, in general, are susceptible to a large number of diseases, including chestnut blight, shoestring root rot, anthracnose, oak leaf blister, cankers, leaf spots, and powdery mildew.  However, this tree is resistant to oak wilt. Potential insect pests include scale, oak skeletonizer, leaf miner, galls, oak lace bugs, borers, caterpillars and nut weevils.

Height:
35-45 ft.
Flower:
Pollen flowers in drooping, elongated clusters; 0.7 to 1 in. acorn; cup covers most of the acorn
Zones:
5-9
Habit:
Deciduous
Site:
Sun; range of soil types including damp sites
Texture:
Medium
Form:
Pyramidal oval when young; oval to rounded with age; uniform branching; lower branches are upswept
Family:
Fagaceae
Poison Part:
Acorns (seeds of nuts) and young leaves.
Poison Delivery Mode:
Ingestion
Symptoms:
Stomach pain, constipation and later bloody diarrhea, excessive thirst and urination
Edibility:
Acorns (nuts) are edible after tannins are leached or boiled out. Only collect nuts from areas you know.
Toxic Principle:
Gallotannins, quercitrin, and quercitin.
Severity:
CAUSES ONLY LOW TOXICITY IF EATEN.
Found in:
Forest or natural areas; landscape as ornamental and shade trees.
Width:
35-40 ft.
Growth Rate:
Moderate
Leaf:
6 to 8 in. alternate, simple leathery leaves; tannin brown fall color
Tags:
deciduous, wet, wet sites, deer resistant, nuts

NCCES plant id: 2165

Quercus lyrata Quercus lyrata