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Quercus petraea is often confused with:
Quercus robur Form
Native alternative(s) for Quercus petraea:
Quercus alba Full Form
Plants that fill a similar niche:
Quercus oglethorpensis Form
Quercus nigra Form
Quercus laevis Form

Durmast Oak Quercus petraea

Other Common Name(s):

Phonetic Spelling
KWER-kus pet-RAY-uh
This plant has low severity poison characteristics.
See below
Description

Sessile oak (Quercus petraea) is a large, long-lived deciduous tree native to most of Europe. It is the national tree of Ireland. It prefers moist, fertile well-drained soils but is adaptable to poorer, drier soils and does well in clay. It prefers an acid pH but is adaptable to neutral and even alkaline soils. The acorns have no stalks (sessile) and develope from the stem in clusters. It has a broad rounded crown and is resistant to mildew.

Sessile oak can be difficult to find in this country.

 

See this plant in the following landscape:
Cultivars / Varieties:
  • Columna
Columna
Tags:
#sun#deciduous#shade tree#partial shade#wildlife plant#moths#wind tolerant#deer resistant#nighttime garden#oak#poison nut#poor soils tolerant#larval host plant#clay soils tolerant#butterfly friendly#pollinator garden#problem for horses#moth larva#banded hairstreak butterfly#gray hairstreak butterfly#imperial moth#juvenal’s duskywing butterfly#edward’s hairstreak butterfly#white-m hairstreak butterfly#horace’s duskywing butterfly
 
Cultivars / Varieties:
  • Columna
Columna
Tags:
#sun#deciduous#shade tree#partial shade#wildlife plant#moths#wind tolerant#deer resistant#nighttime garden#oak#poison nut#poor soils tolerant#larval host plant#clay soils tolerant#butterfly friendly#pollinator garden#problem for horses#moth larva#banded hairstreak butterfly#gray hairstreak butterfly#imperial moth#juvenal’s duskywing butterfly#edward’s hairstreak butterfly#white-m hairstreak butterfly#horace’s duskywing butterfly
  • Attributes:
    Genus:
    Quercus
    Species:
    petraea
    Family:
    Fagaceae
    Uses (Ethnobotany):
    Lumber is used for various building items
    Life Cycle:
    Perennial
    Woody
    Recommended Propagation Strategy:
    Seed
    Country Or Region Of Origin:
    Europe to Northern Iran
    Wildlife Value:
    Many birds and mammals eat the acorns. Oak trees support a wide variety of Lepidopteran. You may see Imperial Moth (Eacles imperialis) larvae which have one brood per season and appear from April-October in the south. Adult Imperial Moths do not feed. Banded Hairstreak (Satyrium calanus), which have one flight from June-August everywhere but Florida where they emerge April-May. Edward's Hairstreak (Satyrium edwardsii), has one flight from May-July in the south and June-July in the north. Gray Hairstreak (Strymon melinus), has three to four flights in the south from February-November and two flights in the north from May-September. White-M Hairstreak (Parrhasius m-album) has three broods in the north from February-October. Horace’s Duskywing (Erynnis horatius) has three broods in Texas and the deep south from January-November, and two broods in the north from April-September. Juvenal’s Duskywing (Erynnis juvenalis) has one brood from April-June, appearing as early as January in Florida.
    Play Value:
    Wildlife Food Source
    Particularly Resistant To (Insects/Diseases/Other Problems):
    Mildly resistant to deer damage.
    Edibility:
    Acorns (nuts) are edible after tannins are leached or boiled out.
    Dimensions:
    Height: 60 ft. 0 in. - 80 ft. 0 in.
    Width: 60 ft. 0 in. - 80 ft. 0 in.
  • Whole Plant Traits:
    Plant Type:
    Poisonous
    Tree
    Woody Plant Leaf Characteristics:
    Deciduous
    Habit/Form:
    Rounded
    Growth Rate:
    Medium
    Maintenance:
    Medium
    Texture:
    Medium
  • Cultural Conditions:
    Light:
    Full sun (6 or more hours of direct sunlight a day)
    Partial Shade (Direct sunlight only part of the day, 2-6 hours)
    Soil Texture:
    Clay
    Loam (Silt)
    Soil pH:
    Acid (<6.0)
    Alkaline (>8.0)
    Neutral (6.0-8.0)
    Soil Drainage:
    Good Drainage
    Available Space To Plant:
    more than 60 feet
    NC Region:
    Mountains
    Piedmont
    USDA Plant Hardiness Zone:
    4b, 4a, 5b, 5a, 6b, 6a, 7b, 7a
  • Fruit:
    Fruit Color:
    Brown/Copper
    Display/Harvest Time:
    Fall
    Fruit Type:
    Nut
    Fruit Length:
    1-3 inches
    Fruit Width:
    < 1 inch
    Fruit Description:
    1.2-inch oval acorns are stalkless and in clusters with a cap covering about 1/3 of the nut. They mature the first year.
  • Flowers:
    Flower Color:
    Gold/Yellow
    Flower Inflorescence:
    Catkin
    Insignificant
    Flower Bloom Time:
    Spring
    Flower Description:
    The flowers form greenish-yellow drooping catkins. Flowering and leafing sprout together..
  • Leaves:
    Woody Plant Leaf Characteristics:
    Deciduous
    Leaf Color:
    Green
    Deciduous Leaf Fall Color:
    Gold/Yellow
    Leaf Type:
    Simple
    Leaf Arrangement:
    Alternate
    Leaf Shape:
    Obovate
    Leaf Margin:
    Lobed
    Undulate
    Hairs Present:
    Yes
    Leaf Length:
    3-6 inches
    Leaf Width:
    < 1 inch
    Leaf Description:
    3-5 inch leaves are glossy green above and pale and smooth to pubescent underneath with 4-6 pairs of rounded lobes.
  • Bark:
    Bark Color:
    Dark Gray
    Bark Description:
    The bark is smooth and gray, later deeply fissured.
  • Stem:
    Stem Color:
    Brown/Copper
    Gray/Silver
    Stem Is Aromatic:
    No
    Stem Lenticels:
    Not Conspicuous
    Stem Surface:
    Smooth (glabrous)
    Stem Description:
    Twigs grey-brown, shiny, hairless, angled, with small tawny lenticels
  • Landscape:
    Landscape Location:
    Lawn
    Meadow
    Naturalized Area
    Landscape Theme:
    Butterfly Garden
    Nighttime Garden
    Pollinator Garden
    Design Feature:
    Shade Tree
    Specimen
    Street Tree
    Attracts:
    Butterflies
    Moths
    Pollinators
    Resistance To Challenges:
    Deer
    Poor Soil
    Wet Soil
    Wind
    Problems:
    Problem for Horses
  • Poisonous to Humans:
    Poison Severity:
    Low
    Poison Symptoms:
    Stomach pain, constipation and later bloody diarrhea, excessive thirst and urination if young leaves or raw acorns eaten.
    Poison Toxic Principle:
    Gallotannins, quercitrin, and quercitin.
    Causes Contact Dermatitis:
    No
    Poison Part:
    Fruits
    Leaves