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Similar but less problematic plants:
Pinus strobus Pinus strobus
Pinus jeffreyi is often confused with:
Pinus ponderosa Pinus ponderosa
Plants that fill a similar niche:
Quercus michauxii Form
Quercus hemisphaerica Form
Quercus stellata Quercus stellata, tree

Yellow Pine Pinus jeffreyi

Other Common Name(s):

Other plants called Yellow Pine:

Previously known as:

  • Pinus ponderosa subsp. jeffreyi
Phonetic Spelling
PY-nus JEF-ree-eye
Description

Jeffrey's Pine is a large, long-lived needled evergreen tree native to Oregon south through Baja California and can be confused with the ponderosa pine. The Jeffrey pine can occupy many sites from the edges of moist, high mountain meadows to arid slopes bordering deserts and it will grow over a wide range of elevations but usually above 5000 ft. It grows in harsh and infertile sites and is tolerant of drought and cold weather. It can grow up to 140 feet tall in ideal conditions.

Its preference is for gravelly to sandy moist soils in full sun. Due to the size of this tree, it is best used in naturalized areas. May do well in the mountains of NC but may not tolerate the heat and humidity of the Piedmont and coastal areas. 

Consider planting Eastern White Pine instead.

See this plant in the following landscape:
Cultivars / Varieties:
Tags:
#sun#drought tolerant#wildlife plant#cones#native tree#moths#needled evergreen#deer resistant#nighttime garden#mountains#long lifespan#blue green leaves#larval host plant#bird friendly#mammals#western tree#pollinator garden#moth larva#imperial moth
 
Cultivars / Varieties:
Tags:
#sun#drought tolerant#wildlife plant#cones#native tree#moths#needled evergreen#deer resistant#nighttime garden#mountains#long lifespan#blue green leaves#larval host plant#bird friendly#mammals#western tree#pollinator garden#moth larva#imperial moth
  • Attributes:
    Genus:
    Pinus
    Species:
    jeffreyi
    Family:
    Pinaceae
    Uses (Ethnobotany):
    Wood is primarily used for lumber
    Life Cycle:
    Woody
    Country Or Region Of Origin:
    Western U.S.A
    Distribution:
    Oregon south to Baja CA and western NV
    Wildlife Value:
    This plant supports Imperial Moth (Eacles imperialis) larvae which have one brood per season and appear from April-October in the south. Adult Imperial Moths do not feed. Seeds are eaten by small mammals and birds. It provides cover for wildlife. Deer resistant
    Play Value:
    Wildlife Cover/Habitat
    Wildlife Food Source
  • Whole Plant Traits:
    Plant Type:
    Tree
    Woody Plant Leaf Characteristics:
    Needled Evergreen
    Habit/Form:
    Ascending
    Conical
    Erect
    Spreading
    Growth Rate:
    Slow
    Maintenance:
    Low
  • Cultural Conditions:
    Light:
    Full sun (6 or more hours of direct sunlight a day)
    Soil Texture:
    Clay
    Loam (Silt)
    Sand
    Shallow Rocky
    Soil Drainage:
    Good Drainage
    Moist
    Occasionally Dry
    NC Region:
    Mountains
    USDA Plant Hardiness Zone:
    5b, 5a, 6b, 6a, 7b, 7a
  • Fruit:
    Fruit Color:
    Brown/Copper
    Fruit Description:
    Oval female cones are 6-10 inches long with inward-facing spines making them feel smooth.
  • Leaves:
    Woody Plant Leaf Characteristics:
    Needled Evergreen
    Leaf Color:
    Blue
    Green
    Leaf Type:
    Needles
    Leaf Shape:
    Linear
    Hairs Present:
    No
    Leaf Length:
    > 6 inches
    Leaf Width:
    < 1 inch
    Leaf Description:
    Needles are 3 per fascicle, spreading-ascending, persisting 5-8 years, and 7-11 inches long. They are slightly twisted, blue-green, all surfaces with fine stomatal lines, margins finely serrulate, and apex acute to acuminate.
  • Bark:
    Bark Color:
    Dark Brown
    Red/Burgundy
    Surface/Attachment:
    Furrowed
    Scaly
    Bark Plate Shape:
    Irregular
    Bark Description:
    The bark is cinnamon brown, thick, deeply furrowed and cross-checked, forming large irregular scaly plates, with an odor of lemon, vanilla or pineapple during the growing season.
  • Stem:
    Stem Color:
    Brown/Copper
    Cream/Tan
    Purple/Lavender
    Red/Burgundy
    Stem Is Aromatic:
    No
    Stem Bud Scales:
    No scales, covered in hair
    Stem Surface:
    Covered with a powdery bloom (glaucous)
    Stem Description:
    Branches are spreading-ascending. The twigs are stout purple-brown and often glaucous, aging rough. Buds ovoid, tan to pale red-brown, non-resinous. Scale margins conspicuously fringed.
  • Landscape:
    Landscape Location:
    Meadow
    Naturalized Area
    Landscape Theme:
    Nighttime Garden
    Pollinator Garden
    Attracts:
    Moths
    Pollinators
    Small Mammals
    Songbirds
    Resistance To Challenges:
    Deer
    Drought
    Dry Soil