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Gelsemium sempervirens

This plant has poison characteristics. See below.
Common Name(s):
Carolina jasmine, Carolina jessamine, Yellow jessamine
Cultivar(s):
Flava, Leo, Major Wheeler, Margapata, Pride of Augusta (double flowers)
Categories:
Groundcover, Native Plants, Poisonous Plants, Vines
Comment:

Born in the South, Gelsemium sempervirens, commonly called the Carolina jessamine is a terrific native vine for Carolina landscapes. Admired for its sweetly scented, canary yellow flowers, this vine really puts on a show from February to April, depending on weather. The golden, trumpet-shaped blooms are 1½ inches long and seen in small clusters, with narrow, glossy evergreen foliage. The foliage bronzes in winter.

Carolina jessamine tolerates short periods of drought and is tolerant of wind.

Carolina jessamine can be trained to arbors and trellises, and is often found in wooded areas growing up tree trunks. The jessamine has a modest growth rate until well-established; it generally takes three to four growing seasons for the vines to cover an average-sized arbor. This landscape plant will become 20 feet or taller when allowed to grow untrained. Occasionally, older jessamine vines become top heavy or sparse. This can be remedied by pruning the vines soon after they finish flowering. The Carolina jessamine is the state flower of South Carolina.

Note: all parts of the plant are poisonous

Regions:  Coastal plains

Seasons of Interest: 

   Blooms:  Early spring/spring            Nut/Fruit/Seed:  Fall

Wildlife Value:   This plant is highly resistant to damage from deer.  Areas of dense growth provide extreme weather and winter cover.  Its flowers are attractive to hummingbirds, butterflies, and other pollinators.  

 

 

Height:
10-20 ft.
Hardiness:
6 to 9
Foliage:
The Carolina jasmine has shiny, lanceolate, light green leaves (to 1-3” long) which are evergreen, but may develop yellow to purple hues in winter. The plants are semi-evergreen toward the northern limits of their growing range.
Flower:
The Carolina jasmine has bright, fragrant, funnel-shaped, yellow flowers (to 1.5” long) that appear either solitary or in clusters (cymes) in late winter to early spring (February – April depending on location). Its flowers often serve as a demonstrative signal that winter is coming to an end. The flowers are followed by a thin, flattened capsule fruit.
Zones:
7-10
Habit:
Evergreen
Site:
Carolina jasmine is winter hardy to USDA Zones 7-10 where it is best grown in moist, organically rich, well-drained soils in full sun. It will tolerate light shade, but best flowering and growth occur in full sun. Plants will grow as a twining vine or if unsupported as a bushy ground cover.
Size:
3 ft. if not allowed-climb with a 20-30 ft. spread
Texture:
Fine to medium
Form:
Twining vine
Exposure:
Sun to partial shade; range of soil types
Fruit:
Yellow flowers in spring; fragrant
Family:
Loganiaceae
Origin:
NC, USA
Distribution:
Piedmont and Coastal Plain.
Poison Part:
All parts
Poison Delivery Mode:
Ingestion
Symptoms:
Sweating, nausea, muscular weakness, dilated pupils, lowered temperature, convulsions, respiratory failure
Edibility:
This plant is not edible.
Toxic Principle:
Alkaloids
Severity:
HIGHLY TOXIC, MAY BE FATAL IF EATEN!
Found in:
Forest or natural areas in open woods, thickets; weedy in disturbed areas along roadsides; landscape as cultivated, flowering, woody vine
Growth Rate:
Moderate to rapid
Climbing Method:
Twining; wiry stems
Tags:
coastal, showstopper, winter interest, apvg, highly beneficial coastal plants, pollinator plant, showy flower, show stopper, birds, pollinator, fragrant, trellis, arbor, wildlife plant, wildlife, deer resistant, evergreen

NCCES plant id: 286

Gelsemium sempervirens Gelsemium sempervirens
Gelsemium sempervirens Gelsemium sempervirens
Nicole Castle, CC BY-NC-2.0
Gelsemium sempervirens Gelsemium sempervirens
Kai-Yan--Joseph-Wong , CC BY-NC-SA - 4.0
Gelsemium sempervirens Gelsemium sempervirens
Phillip Merritt, CC BY-NC-2.0
Gelsemium sempervirens Close up of flower
Photo by Vickis Nature, CC BY-NC-ND - 2.0