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Euonymus americanus

Phonetic Spelling
yoo-ON-ih-mus a-mer-ih-KAY-nus
This plant has low severity poison characteristics.
See below
Description

Euonymus americanus is a low maintenance deciduous shrub native to the southeastern and southern states. It is sometimes called Strawberry bush or bursting heart due to the appearance of its fall berries that to some resembles a strawberry. It is purplish in color with orange seeds. The shrub has medium green leaves in spring and summer, changing to red or red-orange fall foliage and green or purple stems in winter depending on how much sun the shrub has with more sun leading to more purple stems. It matures in a more erect direction after a sprawling early stage. It needs little fertilizer or simply a good quality compost spread. The shrub can be grown in a wide variety of soils, including clay, and tolerates both drought and wet soils to a degree. It tolerates being planted near black walnut trees. 

The plant frequently sustains damage from deer that eat the foliage and twigs. Fruits and seeds are a minor source of food for songbirds.    

This plant has the usual Euonymus shrub poison characteristics. See below in poison section.

It is native to wooded slopes, moist woodland and creek or river areas, and is found in a variety of soil conditions ranging from sandy to clay. The typical range is from New York coast all the way south and across Texas and inland to the midwest from all those points.  

Fire Risk: This plant has a low flammability rating.

More information on Euonymus.

Cultivars / Varieties:
Tags:
#deciduous#songbirds#drought tolerant#wildlife plant#fall interest#hedge#black walnut#clay#showy fruits#wet sites#low flammability#fire resistant#woodland
 
Cultivars / Varieties:
Tags:
#deciduous#songbirds#drought tolerant#wildlife plant#fall interest#hedge#black walnut#clay#showy fruits#wet sites#low flammability#fire resistant#woodland
  • Attributes:
    Genus:
    Euonymus
    Species:
    americanus
    Family:
    Celastraceae
    Life Cycle:
    Perennial
    Recommended Propagation Strategy:
    Stem Cutting
    Country Or Region Of Origin:
    Native to Southeastern, southern US states
    Fire Risk Rating:
    low flammability
    Wildlife Value:
    Songbirds
    Particularly Resistant To (Insects/Diseases/Other Problems):
    fire in the landscape.
    Dimensions:
    Height: 4 ft. 0 in. - 6 ft. 0 in.
    Width: 3 ft. 0 in. - 4 ft. 0 in.
  • Whole Plant Traits:
    Plant Type:
    Native Plant
    Poisonous
    Shrub
    Leaf Characteristics:
    Deciduous
    Habit/Form:
    Multi-stemmed
    Growth Rate:
    Medium
    Maintenance:
    Low
  • Cultural Conditions:
    Light:
    Partial Shade (Direct sunlight only part of the day, 2-6 hours)
    Soil Texture:
    Clay
    High Organic Matter
    Loam (Silt)
    Soil Drainage:
    Good Drainage
    Occasionally Wet
    Available Space To Plant:
    6-feet-12 feet
    NC Region:
    Coastal
    Mountains
    Piedmont
    Usda Plant Hardiness Zone:
    6a, 6b, 7a, 7b, 8a, 8b, 9a, 9b
  • Flowers:
    Flower Color:
    Gold/Yellow
    Green
    Purple/Lavender
    Flower Bloom Time:
    Summer
    Flower Petals:
    4-5 petals/rays
    Flower Size:
    < 1 inch
    Flower Description:
    Non-showy, small blooms about 1/3 inch across with 5 petals.
  • Leaves:
    Leaf Characteristics:
    Deciduous
    Leaf Color:
    Green
    Leaf Shape:
    Elliptical
    Oblong
    Leaf Margin:
    Crenulate
    Hairs Present:
    No
    Leaf Length:
    1-3 inches
    Leaf Description:
    Yellow green spring to early fall then turns red.
  • Stem:
    Stem Color:
    Green
    Purple/Lavender
    Stem Is Aromatic:
    No
    Stem Description:
    Has flat woody outgrowths resembling "wings" on opposite sides of stems.
  • Landscape:
    Landscape Location:
    Woodland
    Design Feature:
    Hedge
    Small groups
    Specimen
    Attracts:
    Songbirds
    Resistance To Challenges:
    Fire
    Wet Soil
  • Poison:
    Poison Severity:
    Low
    Poison Symptoms:
    Vomiting, diarrhea, weakness, chills, coma, and convulsions, IF EATEN IN LARGE QUANTITIES
    Poison Toxic Principle:
    Unidentified, possibly a glycoside
    Causes Contact Dermatitis:
    No
    Poison Part:
    Flowers
    Fruits
    Leaves
    Sap/Juice
    Stems