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Euonymus americanus

Phonetic Spelling
yoo-ON-ih-mus a-mer-ih-KAY-nus
This plant has low severity poison characteristics.
See below
Description

Euonymus americanus is a  low maintenance deciduous shrub native to the southeastern US in the Celastraceae family.  It has attractive yellow-green fall foliage and striking green stems in winter. Euonymus americanus has an open, airy habit that is sprawling when young but more erect as the plant matures. Fertilize it lightly as too much can burn the foliage.  It can be grown on clay soils and is drought tolerant but also tolerates wet soils.  Tolerates being planted near black walnut trees. 

It is native to wooded slopes, moist understory forest areas, low sandy woods, ravines and streambanks from New York south to Florida and west through Pennsylvania to Illinois, Missouri, Oklahoma and eastern Texas. 

Its bark is green, but does split and become darker as the tree ages.

Regions:  Mountain, Piedmont, Coastal plains

Seasons of Interest

Foliage: Fall, yellow Bloom: Summer   Fruit: Fall, red-orange berries

Wildlife Value: The plant frequently sustains damaged from deer.  The foilage and twigs are eaten by white-tailed deer.  Flowers are attractive to hummingbirds.  Fruits are attractive to birds.  Its seeds are eaten by songbirds.

Euonymus americanus

This plant has poison characteristics. See below.

Common Name(s):

Hearts a'busting, Strawberry bush

Categories:

Native PlantsPoisonous PlantsShrubs

Comment:

Euonymus americanus is a  low maintenance deciduous shrub native to the southeastern US in the Celastraceae family.  It has attractive yellow-green fall foliage and striking green stems in winter. Euonymus americanus has an open, airy habit that is sprawling when young but more erect as the plant matures. Fertilize it lightly as too much can burn the foliage.  It can be grown on clay soils and is drought tolerant but also tolerates wet soils.  Tolerates being planted near black walnut trees. 

It is native to wooded slopes, moist understory forest areas, low sandy woods, ravines and streambanks from New York south to Florida and west through Pennsylvania to Illinois, Missouri, Oklahoma and eastern Texas. 

Its bark is green, but does split and become darker as the tree ages.

Seasons of Interest . Foliage: Fall, yellow Bloom: Summer   Fruit: Fall, red-orange berries

Wildlife Value: The plant frequently sustains damaged from deer.  The foilage and twigs are eaten by white-tailed deer.  Flowers are attractive to hummingbirds.  Fruits are attractive to birds.  Its seeds are eaten by songbirds.

Insects, Diseases and Other Plant Problems: This plant has no serious insect or disease problems. Watch for euonymus scale, mites, leaf miner, aphids, mealybugs and crown gall. Witches’ broom, stem dieback, powdery mildew and fungal leaf spots may appear. 

 

Foliage:

Thin spreading branches are clad with oblong to elliptic leaves (to 3” long) with crenulate margins, narrow to rounded bases and sharply pointed tips. Each leaf has 5-7 pairs of ascending veins which disappear prior to reaching the margins. Leaves turn dark orange-red in fall. The leaves are opposite and simple. It has attractive green stems in the winter.

Flower:

Spring flowers bloom from the leaf axils on pedicils to 1” long. Each flower (1/3” across) has 5 pale green to greenish yellow petals with purple stamens. Most flowers in the genus have 4 petals, but this species has 5. Although the flowers are not showy, they are followed in fall by extremely showy, warty, crimson red fall fruits (to 3/4” diameter). Each fruit is a 5-lobed capsule which splits open when ripe in the fall that resemble strawberries, (hence the sometimes used common name of strawberry bush or bursting heart)

Habit: Deciduous

Site: Partial shade; tolerates moist soil

Texture: Medium

Form: Open, loose, airy habit; green stems; suckers

Exposure: Partial shade; tolerates moist soil

Fruit:

Berry

 

Distribution:

Southeastern US

Poison Part:

All parts

Poison Delivery Mode:

Ingestion

Symptoms:

 

 

Severity:

 

Found in:

Forest or natural areas in mixed deciduous forests and low woodlands; weedy in disturbed areas around houses and buildings; land

 

More information on Euonymus.

Cultivars:
Tags:
#hummingbirds#deciduous#songbirds#drought tolerant#wildlife plant#woodland garden#fall interest#hedge#black walnut#clay#showy fruits#wet sites#low flammability#fire resistant
Cultivars:
Tags:
#hummingbirds#deciduous#songbirds#drought tolerant#wildlife plant#woodland garden#fall interest#hedge#black walnut#clay#showy fruits#wet sites#low flammability#fire resistant
  • Attributes:
    Genus:
    Euonymus
    Species:
    americanus
    Family:
    Celastraceae
    Fire Risk Rating:
    low flammability
    Particularly Resistant To (Insects/Diseases/Other Problems):
    fire in the landscape.
    Dimensions:
    Height: 4 ft. 0 in. - 6 ft. 0 in.
    Width: 3 ft. 0 in. - 4 ft. 0 in.
  • Whole Plant Traits:
    Plant Type:
    Native Plant
    Poisonous
    Shrub
    Leaf Characteristics:
    Deciduous
  • Cultural Conditions:
    NC Region:
    Coastal
    Mountains
    Piedmont
    Usda Plant Hardiness Zone:
    6a, 6b, 7a, 7b, 8a, 8b, 9a, 9b
  • Flowers:
    Flower Color:
    Gold/Yellow
    Green
    Purple/Lavender
  • Leaves:
    Leaf Characteristics:
    Deciduous
    Leaf Color:
    Green
    Hairs Present:
    No
  • Stem:
    Stem Is Aromatic:
    No
  • Landscape:
    Landscape Location:
    Woodland
    Design Feature:
    Hedge
    Attracts:
    Hummingbirds
    Songbirds
    Resistance To Challenges:
    Wet Soil
  • Poison:
    Poison Severity:
    Low
    Poison Symptoms:
    Vomiting, diarrhea, weakness, chills, coma, and convulsions, IF EATEN IN LARGE QUANTITIES
    Poison Toxic Principle:
    Unidentified, possibly a glycoside
    Causes Contact Dermatitis:
    No
    Poison Part:
    Flowers
    Fruits
    Leaves
    Sap/Juice
    Stems