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Dwarf Larkspur Delphinium tricorne

Other Common Name(s):

Phonetic Spelling
del-FIN-ee-um trai-korn
This plant has high severity poison characteristics.
See below
Description

Dwarf larkspur is a herbaceous perennial in the buttercup family native to the eastern United States, where it is the most common Delphinium found in moist forests and thickets. This plant will struggle in areas with high humidity summers.

The flowers bloom in July to Sept. in loose clusters of 6-12 flowers that are usually bluish-purple but sometimes have some white. They are tubular with one sepal bent backwards to create a spur. The leaves are finely cut into deep lobes and mostly basal.

Dwarf Larkspur prefers fertile moist soils with some shade in the afternoon and a protective spot from winds. Use in borders, mass planting or small groups, a woodland setting or native garden.

Diseases, Insects and Problems: Diseases are powdery mildew, botrytis blight, leaf spots and crown rot. Insects are Slugs and snails, aphids, leaf miners, stem borers and mites. Staking may be required for taller plants. Poisonous.

See this plant in the following landscape:
Cultivars / Varieties:
Tags:
#poisonous#purple flowers#blue flowers#cut flowers#NC native#wildflower garden#food source fall#food source herbage#coastal FAC#Piedmont Mountains FAC#bird friendly#food source hard mast fruit#moth larvae#problem for cats#problem for dogs#problem for horses#audubon
 
Cultivars / Varieties:
Tags:
#poisonous#purple flowers#blue flowers#cut flowers#NC native#wildflower garden#food source fall#food source herbage#coastal FAC#Piedmont Mountains FAC#bird friendly#food source hard mast fruit#moth larvae#problem for cats#problem for dogs#problem for horses#audubon
  • Attributes:
    Genus:
    Delphinium
    Species:
    tricorne
    Family:
    Ranunculaceae
    Life Cycle:
    Perennial
    Recommended Propagation Strategy:
    Seed
    Country Or Region Of Origin:
    North Central & Eastern U.S.A
    Distribution:
    AL , AR , DC , GA , IA , IL , IN , KS , KY , MD , MN , MO , MS , NC , NE , OH , OK , PA , SC , TN , VA , WV
    Wildlife Value:
    This plant attracts birds and moth larvae.
    Edibility:
    Poisonous
    Dimensions:
    Height: 1 ft. 0 in. - 3 ft. 0 in.
    Width: 1 ft. 0 in. - 1 ft. 6 in.
  • Whole Plant Traits:
    Plant Type:
    Native Plant
    Poisonous
    Wildflower
    Habit/Form:
    Erect
    Maintenance:
    High
  • Cultural Conditions:
    Light:
    Full sun (6 or more hours of direct sunlight a day)
    Partial Shade (Direct sunlight only part of the day, 2-6 hours)
    Soil Texture:
    High Organic Matter
    Soil pH:
    Neutral (6.0-8.0)
    Soil Drainage:
    Good Drainage
    Moist
    Available Space To Plant:
    Less than 12 inches
    NC Region:
    Mountains
    Piedmont
    USDA Plant Hardiness Zone:
    4b, 4a, 5b, 5a, 6b, 6a, 7b, 7a
  • Fruit:
    Fruit Color:
    Green
    Display/Harvest Time:
    Fall
    Fruit Type:
    Follicle
    Fruit Description:
    Three horn-like fruit pods split to release seeds August to October.
  • Flowers:
    Flower Color:
    Blue
    Purple/Lavender
    White
    Flower Inflorescence:
    Raceme
    Flower Value To Gardener:
    Good Cut
    Showy
    Flower Bloom Time:
    Fall
    Summer
    Flower Shape:
    Trumpet
    Flower Petals:
    4-5 petals/rays
    Colored Sepals
    Flower Size:
    1-3 inches
    Flower Description:
    Loose raceme of up to 1.5-inch bluish-purple to occasionally whitish trumpet-shaped flowers. Five petal-like sepals with the upper sepal extending backward into an upright spur. The four petals are small. Flowers bloom from July to September.
  • Leaves:
    Leaf Color:
    Gray/Silver
    Green
    Leaf Type:
    Simple
    Leaf Arrangement:
    Alternate
    Leaf Shape:
    Rhomboidal
    Leaf Margin:
    Lobed
    Hairs Present:
    No
    Leaf Length:
    3-6 inches
    Leaf Width:
    3-6 inches
    Leaf Description:
    Up to 4 inches long and wide gray-green to green basal leaves are finely cut and palmately divided into 5 deep lobes which are in turn divided into 2-3 shallow secondary lobes. Their stems are hairy and long. Stems leaves occur sparsely up the flower stem.
  • Stem:
    Stem Color:
    Gray/Silver
    Green
    Stem Is Aromatic:
    No
    Stem Cross Section:
    Round
    Stem Surface:
    Hairy (pubescent)
    Stem Description:
    Stems are erect, hairy, terete, and fleshy. May need staking when flowering.
  • Landscape:
    Landscape Location:
    Meadow
    Naturalized Area
    Slope/Bank
    Woodland
    Landscape Theme:
    Cottage Garden
    Native Garden
    Design Feature:
    Border
    Mass Planting
    Small groups
    Attracts:
    Moths
    Songbirds
    Problems:
    Poisonous to Humans
    Problem for Cats
    Problem for Dogs
    Problem for Horses
    Weedy
  • Poisonous to Humans:
    Poison Severity:
    High
    Poison Symptoms:
    Burning of lips and mouth, numbness of throat; intense vomiting and diarrhea, muscular weakness and spasms, weak pulse, paralysis of the respiratory system, convulsions; may be fatal if eaten. Unless there is a lack of suitable forage, horses typically do not consume toxic amounts of larkspur. The toxicity of the plant may vary depending on seasonal changes and field conditions; as the plant matures, it generally becomes less toxic. Clinical effects include constipation, colic, increased salivation, stiffness, weakness, recumbency, and convulsions. Cardiac failure may occur, as can death from respiratory paralysis.
    Poison Toxic Principle:
    Alkaloids delphinine, ajacine, and others.
    Causes Contact Dermatitis:
    No
    Poison Part:
    Flowers
    Leaves
    Seeds
    Stems