Plant DetailShow Menu

White Veined Hardy Dutchman's Pipe Aristolochia fimbriata

Previously known as:

  • Aristolochia bonplandii
  • Aristolochia ciliata
  • Aristolochia ciliosa
  • Aristolochia insignis
  • Howardia fimbriata
Phonetic Spelling
a-ris-toh-LOH-kee-uh fim-bry-AH-tuh
This plant has high severity poison characteristics.
See below
Description

White Veined Hardy Dutchman's Pipe is a perennial vine groundcover. The plant is a native of Bolivia, Brazil, and North-East Argentina. The genus name, Aristolochia, is the combination of two words. The Greek word, aristos, translated means "best." The Greek word, locheia, translated means "childbirth." This references the flower's structure resembling a human fetus. The species name, fimbriata, is Latin and means "fringed." The common name, Dutchman's Pipe, references the shape of the flowers that resemble the Meershaun smoking pipes once used in Europe.

This deciduous groundcover grows 6-12 inches in height, and the mound spreads about 2-3 feet with tuberous roots. The delicate foliage is heart-shaped and green with showy silver veining. Small fragrant speckled flowers resemble a trumpet-shaped clay pipe with a fringe of thread-like hairs at the opening giving a great show through the summer This prostrate mounding vine has green, wiry stems. 

The vine prefers morning sun and afternoon shade. It will tolerate full shade and can tolerate full sun with adequate watering. Rich or sandy well-drained soil is preferred. It propagates by self-sowing of seeds from the previous season.  It is dormant in winter so think about placement as it will leave a bare spot in the landscape.  While it is hardy down to zone 7 in cold climates it can be grown as an annual.

The pipevine swallowtail butterfly uses the plant as a food source.  Their caterpillars will strip the above-ground growth of the plant in mid-summer and the adult butterflies will return to lay more eggs.  When the new caterpillars emerge in the spring they feast on the tuberous roots.  The pipevine swallowtail butterfly is immune to the poison in this particular species that can cause problems for humans.  If swallowtail larval browsing is too heavy consider planting one of the larger pipevines.  

It is drought and deer resistant and works well in shady spots that could use a bright pop of color with its silvery leaves.  The trailing form looks beautiful hanging from hanging baskets or cascading over a garden wall.  

 

 

See this plant in the following landscape:
Cultivars / Varieties:
Tags:
#showy flowers#fragrant flowers#drought tolerant#wildlife plants#hanging baskets#showy fruits#vines#deer resistant#long bloom time#groundcover#pollinator plant#larval host plant#food source herbage#garden walls#butterfly friendly#pollinator garden#perennial vines#pipevine swallowtail butterfly#container plants
 
Cultivars / Varieties:
Tags:
#showy flowers#fragrant flowers#drought tolerant#wildlife plants#hanging baskets#showy fruits#vines#deer resistant#long bloom time#groundcover#pollinator plant#larval host plant#food source herbage#garden walls#butterfly friendly#pollinator garden#perennial vines#pipevine swallowtail butterfly#container plants
  • Attributes:
    Genus:
    Aristolochia
    Species:
    fimbriata
    Family:
    Aristolochiaceae
    Life Cycle:
    Perennial
    Recommended Propagation Strategy:
    Seed
    Country Or Region Of Origin:
    Argentina Northeast, Bolivia, Brazil South, Paraguay, Uruguay
    Distribution:
    Introduced: Transcaucasus
    Wildlife Value:
    Larval host plant for the Pipevine swallowtail butterfly. This plant supports Pipevine Swallowtail (Battus philenor) larvae which appear in late spring and summer in the east and California. In the south and southwest regions it most commonly appears in late summer through fall. Adult Pipevine Swallowtail butterflies feed solely off of flower nectar from other plants like azaleas, thistles, verbena, lupines, and lilacs.
    Play Value:
    Wildlife Larval Host
    Dimensions:
    Height: 0 ft. 6 in. - 1 ft. 0 in.
    Width: 1 ft. 6 in. - 3 ft. 0 in.
  • Whole Plant Traits:
    Plant Type:
    Ground Cover
    Vine
    Habit/Form:
    Mounding
    Prostrate
  • Cultural Conditions:
    Light:
    Dappled Sunlight (Shade through upper canopy all day)
    Full sun (6 or more hours of direct sunlight a day)
    Partial Shade (Direct sunlight only part of the day, 2-6 hours)
    Soil Texture:
    High Organic Matter
    Sand
    Soil Drainage:
    Good Drainage
    Moist
    Available Space To Plant:
    3 feet-6 feet
    NC Region:
    Coastal
    Piedmont
    USDA Plant Hardiness Zone:
    7b, 7a, 8b, 8a, 9b, 9a
  • Fruit:
    Fruit Color:
    Green
    Fruit Value To Gardener:
    Showy
    Fruit Description:
    Fruits are attractive green oval and ribbed resembling tiny watermellons.
  • Flowers:
    Flower Color:
    Brown/Copper
    Gold/Yellow
    Green
    Red/Burgundy
    Flower Inflorescence:
    Solitary
    Flower Value To Gardener:
    Fragrant
    Long Bloom Season
    Flower Bloom Time:
    Summer
    Flower Shape:
    Trumpet
    Flower Size:
    < 1 inch
    Flower Description:
    1 inch long, and the trumpet is shaped like a clay pipe with tenticles on the end. The green tubes develop along the stem and at the opening flairs out to reveal mottled yellowish-brown to yellowish-maroon interiors. They bloom all summer.
  • Leaves:
    Leaf Color:
    Blue
    Gray/Silver
    Green
    Variegated
    Leaf Type:
    Simple
    Leaf Shape:
    Cordate
    Reniform
    Hairs Present:
    No
    Leaf Length:
    1-3 inches
    Leaf Width:
    1-3 inches
    Leaf Description:
    The leaves are blue green, heart-shaped, and marked with silver veins. The foliage is spaced along a wiry stem.
  • Stem:
    Stem Color:
    Green
    Stem Is Aromatic:
    No
    Stem Description:
    The stems are green, wiry, and prostrate.
  • Landscape:
    Landscape Location:
    Container
    Hanging Baskets
    Rock Wall
    Vertical Spaces
    Woodland
    Landscape Theme:
    Butterfly Garden
    Pollinator Garden
    Design Feature:
    Border
    Attracts:
    Butterflies
    Pollinators
    Problems:
    Poisonous to Humans
    Problem for Children
  • Poisonous to Humans:
    Poison Severity:
    High
    Poison Symptoms:
    Ingestion of any part of this plant may cause irreversible kidney failure.
    Poison Toxic Principle:
    Aristolochic acid--lethal toxin
    Causes Contact Dermatitis:
    No
    Poison Part:
    Flowers
    Fruits
    Leaves
    Roots
    Sap/Juice
    Seeds
    Stems