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Marigold Tagetes

Other plants called Marigold:

Phonetic Spelling
tah-geh' tease
This plant has low severity poison characteristics.
See below
Description

Tagetes, or marigolds, is a genus in the sunflower or aster family that includes 49 species of flowering, herbaceous plants with a shrubby form that is native to Central and South America and have been introduced throughout the world. Depending on their environment and whether they are grown as an outdoor or indoor plant, Marigolds can be annuals or perennials.

The plants give off a strong aroma when crushed and marigold flowers are bitter with a spicy, herbal flavor. The 'Lemon Gem' and 'Tangerine Gem' cultivars, however, are quite flavorful. The flowers can be made more palatable if you remove the bitter, white base of the petal. The plant is often used in tea, to color foods, and as a substitute for tarragon; however, it can be harmful if eaten in large amounts. The juice, sap, or thorns of these plants may cause a painful skin rash or irritation. Wash the affected area of the skin with soap and water as soon as possible after contact.

The name Tagetes comes from the name of an Etruscan seer supposedly born from the plowing of the earth and refers to the ease with which plants of this genus come out each year either by the seeds produced in the previous year or by the stems which regrow from the stump already in place. The common name, marigold, is a shortened form of "Mary's gold."

As an annual, Marigolds are upright and typically 1 to 4 feet tall. Depending on the species, Marigolds can range from 4 inches high to as much as 7 feet. Again, depending on the species, Marigolds grow well in almost any sort of soil with good drainage, and some cultivars are known to have good tolerance to drought. They can grow in full or partial sun, but full sun encourages blooms.

Consider Marigolds for mass plantings, borders, containers, cottage gardens, or a cutting garden. Remember to deadhead for repeat blooming throughout the summer.

Seasons of Interest:

Bloom:  Summer            Foliage:  Summer

Quick ID Hints:

  • annual, erect, and 1 to 4 feet tall 
  • erect stems and branched distally
  • leaves are pinnatifid, opposite or alternate, lanceolate to oblanceolate, dentate margins with aromatic glands 
  • yellow or orange solitary flower heads that measure 0.5 to 4 inches across

Diseases, Insect Pests, and Other Plant Problems: Marigolds have no serious insect problems, but spider mites, Japanese Beetles, and slugs may be seen. Potential diseases include wilt, stem rot, leaf spots, botrytis blight, and aster yellow virus.

 

 

 VIDEO Created by Elisabeth Meyer for "Annuals, Perennials, Vines, and Groundcovers" a plant identification course offered in partnership with Longwood Gardens. 

Profile Video:
See this plant in the following landscapes:
Border Landscape Pinewild County Club, Moore County Vegetable Garden and Pollinator Plants Flower Bonanza Garden
Cultivars / Varieties:
Tags:
#fragrant#hummingbirds#showy flowers#poisonous#summer annual#yellow flowers#orange flowers#apvg#cottage garden#mass planting#cpp#edging#deer resistant#border planting#cutting garden#walkway planting#butterfly friendly#apvg-a#container plant#landscape plant sleuths course
 
Cultivars / Varieties:
Tags:
#fragrant#hummingbirds#showy flowers#poisonous#summer annual#yellow flowers#orange flowers#apvg#cottage garden#mass planting#cpp#edging#deer resistant#border planting#cutting garden#walkway planting#butterfly friendly#apvg-a#container plant#landscape plant sleuths course
  • Attributes:
    Genus:
    Tagetes
    Species:
    spp.
    Family:
    Asteraceae
    Uses (Ethnobotany):
    Houseplant or interiorscape; landscape in flower gardens as tender, herbaceous annual.
    Life Cycle:
    Annual
    Perennial
    Recommended Propagation Strategy:
    Seed
    Country Or Region Of Origin:
    Mexico, Central and South America
    Distribution:
    United States, Canada, Europe, Asia, Africa, Australia
    Wildlife Value:
    Seldom damaged by deer. Butterflies feed on this plant.
    Play Value:
    Colorful
    Easy to Grow
    Edibility:
    'Lemon Gem’ and ‘Tangerine Gem’ have the best flavor; remove the bitter, white base of the petal. May be harmful if eaten in large amounts. Used in tea, coloring foods, substitute for tarragon.
    Dimensions:
    Height: 1 ft. 0 in. - 4 ft. 0 in.
    Width: 0 ft. 6 in. - 1 ft. 0 in.
  • Whole Plant Traits:
    Plant Type:
    Annual
    Edible
    Herb
    Herbaceous Perennial
    Poisonous
    Habit/Form:
    Clumping
    Erect
    Rounded
    Growth Rate:
    Rapid
    Maintenance:
    Low
  • Cultural Conditions:
    Light:
    Full sun (6 or more hours of direct sunlight a day)
    Soil Texture:
    Clay
    High Organic Matter
    Loam (Silt)
    Sand
    Soil pH:
    Acid (<6.0)
    Alkaline (>8.0)
    Neutral (6.0-8.0)
    Soil Drainage:
    Good Drainage
    Moist
    Occasionally Dry
    Available Space To Plant:
    Less than 12 inches
    NC Region:
    Coastal
    Mountains
    Piedmont
    USDA Plant Hardiness Zone:
    2a, 2b, 3a, 3b, 4b, 4a, 5a, 5b, 6b, 6a, 7a, 7b, 8b, 8a, 9a, 9b, 10a, 10b, 11a, 11b
  • Fruit:
    Fruit Color:
    Black
    Fruit Type:
    Achene
    Fruit Description:
    Achenes black, narrowly cylindrical; pappus of 1 to 3 setae and 7 to 9 much shorter scales with ciliate margins.
  • Flowers:
    Flower Color:
    Gold/Yellow
    Orange
    Flower Inflorescence:
    Corymb
    Head
    Flower Value To Gardener:
    Edible
    Long Bloom Season
    Flower Bloom Time:
    Summer
    Flower Size:
    1-3 inches
    Flower Description:
    The flowers are typically solitary heads in colors of yellow or orange and measure 0.5 to 4 inches in diameter. Some cultivars are bicolor. Depending on species, flowers can be solitary or in dense corymbs, terminal, heterogamous; phyllaries in a single row (rarely in 2 rows), the margins connate, glandular; receptacle epaleate.
  • Leaves:
    Leaf Color:
    Green
    Leaf Value To Gardener:
    Fragrant
    Leaf Type:
    Compound (Pinnately , Bipinnately, Palmately)
    Leaf Arrangement:
    Alternate
    Opposite
    Leaf Shape:
    Lanceolate
    Oblanceolate
    Leaf Margin:
    Denticulate
    Entire
    Hairs Present:
    Yes
    Leaf Description:
    Leaves of various species can be opposite or alternate, usually pinnate, sometimes simple, and the margins have teeth and are dotted with glands. The oil of the glands is aromatic when crushed.
  • Stem:
    Stem Is Aromatic:
    No
    Stem Form:
    Straight
    Stem Description:
    The stems are erect and branched distally.
  • Landscape:
    Landscape Location:
    Container
    Houseplants
    Patio
    Pool/Hardscape
    Recreational Play Area
    Small Space
    Walkways
    Landscape Theme:
    Cottage Garden
    Cutting Garden
    Drought Tolerant Garden
    Edible Garden
    Design Feature:
    Border
    Mass Planting
    Attracts:
    Butterflies
    Songbirds
    Resistance To Challenges:
    Deer
    Problems:
    Contact Dermatitis
    Poisonous to Humans
  • Poisonous to Humans:
    Poison Severity:
    Low
    Poison Symptoms:
    Skin redness, burning pain, and blisters when broken skin is in contact with cell sap plus sunlight; nose and eye irritation from aroma of flowers.
    Poison Toxic Principle:
    Phototoxic thiophene derivatives
    Causes Contact Dermatitis:
    Yes
    Poison Part:
    Flowers
    Leaves
    Roots