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Oxalis triangularis

Previously known as:

  • Oxalis regnellii
Phonetic Spelling
oks-AL-iss
This plant has low severity poison characteristics.
See below
Description

Purple Shamrock Plant is a rhizomatous herbaceous ornamental garden or houseplant in the wood sorrel family that is native to South America. The trifoliate leaves resemble a shamrock and can be green to variegated to deep maroon in color. The leaves close up at night or when disturbed. The white to pink 5-petaled flowers bloom in clusters in spring to summer on stems held above the plant and also close at night.

In most of NC, it will need to be grown as a houseplant. Use a loamy potting mix with good drainage and allow the surface to dry between waterings. Place in full sun to partial shade. The plant may go dormant for a while in fall or if it gets too hot or too dry. Cut back on watering and wait for new growth to appear. 

See this plant in the following landscapes:
Asian Garden- Zen Garden Davidson County Demo Garden Herb & Flower Cottage Garden Asian Garden- Zen Garden Collector’s Garden
Cultivars / Varieties:
  • 'Francis'
'Francis'
Tags:
#sun#poisonous#partial shade#houseplant#perennial#white flowers#pink flowers#purple leaves#interiorscape#variegated leaves#herbaceous perennial#HS302#shamrock#problem for cats#problem for dogs#problem for horses
 
Cultivars / Varieties:
  • 'Francis'
'Francis'
Tags:
#sun#poisonous#partial shade#houseplant#perennial#white flowers#pink flowers#purple leaves#interiorscape#variegated leaves#herbaceous perennial#HS302#shamrock#problem for cats#problem for dogs#problem for horses
  • Attributes:
    Genus:
    Oxalis
    Species:
    triangularis
    Family:
    Oxalidaceae
    Life Cycle:
    Perennial
    Recommended Propagation Strategy:
    Division
    Seed
    Country Or Region Of Origin:
    South America
    Wildlife Value:
    Deer resistant. Attracts butterflies.
    Edibility:
    Leaves and flowers are edible but should be used in moderation.
    Dimensions:
    Height: 0 ft. 6 in. - 1 ft. 6 in.
    Width: 1 ft. 0 in. - 2 ft. 0 in.
  • Whole Plant Traits:
    Plant Type:
    Herbaceous Perennial
    Houseplant
    Perennial
    Poisonous
    Habit/Form:
    Clumping
    Spreading
    Growth Rate:
    Medium
  • Cultural Conditions:
    Light:
    Full sun (6 or more hours of direct sunlight a day)
    Partial Shade (Direct sunlight only part of the day, 2-6 hours)
    Soil Texture:
    Loam (Silt)
    Sand
    Soil pH:
    Acid (<6.0)
    Alkaline (>8.0)
    Neutral (6.0-8.0)
    Soil Drainage:
    Good Drainage
    Moist
    Occasionally Dry
    Available Space To Plant:
    12 inches-3 feet
    NC Region:
    Coastal
    USDA Plant Hardiness Zone:
    8b, 8a, 9b, 9a, 10a, 11a, 11b
  • Flowers:
    Flower Color:
    Purple/Lavender
    White
    Flower Inflorescence:
    Cyme
    Umbel
    Flower Value To Gardener:
    Edible
    Showy
    Flower Bloom Time:
    Fall
    Summer
    Flower Shape:
    Funnel
    Saucer
    Tubular
    Flower Petals:
    4-5 petals/rays
    Flower Size:
    < 1 inch
    Flower Description:
    5-petaled white to pale pink flowers early summer through fall. They close at night.
  • Leaves:
    Leaf Color:
    Green
    Purple/Lavender
    Leaf Value To Gardener:
    Edible
    Showy
    Leaf Type:
    Compound (Pinnately , Bipinnately, Palmately)
    Leaf Arrangement:
    Rosulate
    Leaf Shape:
    Deltoid
    Leaf Margin:
    Entire
    Hairs Present:
    No
    Leaf Length:
    1-3 inches
    Leaf Width:
    1-3 inches
    Leaf Description:
    Deep maroon to green trifoliate leaves that close at night.
  • Stem:
    Stem Color:
    Green
    Purple/Lavender
    Stem Is Aromatic:
    No
    Stem Cross Section:
    Round
    Stem Surface:
    Smooth (glabrous)
  • Landscape:
    Landscape Location:
    Container
    Houseplants
    Patio
    Design Feature:
    Border
    Attracts:
    Butterflies
    Resistance To Challenges:
    Deer
    Rabbits
    Problems:
    Problem for Cats
    Problem for Dogs
    Problem for Horses
  • Poisonous to Humans:
    Poison Severity:
    Low
    Poison Symptoms:
    All parts of the plant have toxic potential, although the possibility of serious effects is usually limited to ingestions of large quantities. Consuming Oxalis species can produce colic in horses, and kidney failure is possible if significant amounts are eaten.
    Poison Toxic Principle:
    Soluble calcium oxylates
    Causes Contact Dermatitis:
    No
    Poison Part:
    Flowers
    Fruits
    Leaves
    Roots
    Sap/Juice
    Seeds
    Stems