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Laportea canadensis is often confused with:
Boehmeria cylindrica
Plants that fill a similar niche:
Viola sororia Viola papilionacea
Viola pubescens Form
Viola hastata Viola hastata

Laportea canadensis

Common Name(s):

Phonetic Spelling
lah-POR-tee-ah kan-ah-DEN-sis
This plant has medium severity poison characteristics.
See below
Description

Erect, perennial herb with conspicuous stinging hairs throughout; leaves alternate, simple, coarsely toothed; flowers small and inconspicuous, in axillary clusters

Forest or natural areas in rich woods, moist bottomlands of rivers and streams

EDIBLE PARTS: Young shoots eaten as potherb. Boiling destroys irritant. Add to stews or soups. HARVEST TIME: Only collect young shoots from areas you know have NOT been treated with pesticides. Collect the young shoots in the spring. Wear gloves while collecting shoots; the shoots can cause a stinging effect. SAFE HANDLING PROCEDURES: Soak young shoots in warm water to remove dirt and debris. Do not use dish detergent or any type of sanitizer. These products can leave a residue. Place young shoots in boiling, salted water (with a pair of kitchen tongs) and boil for five minutes. Serve as a vegetable or add to soups. The stinging quality disappears after cooking. SOURCE: Crowhurst, A. 1972. The Weed Cookbook. Lancer Books, Inc. New York, 190 pp.

See this plant in the following landscape:
Cultivars / Varieties:
Tags:
#poisonous#perennial#wildlife plant#NC native#native garden#edible garden#larval host plant#butterfly friendly#pollinator garden#eastern comma butterfly#red admiral butterfly
 
Cultivars / Varieties:
Tags:
#poisonous#perennial#wildlife plant#NC native#native garden#edible garden#larval host plant#butterfly friendly#pollinator garden#eastern comma butterfly#red admiral butterfly
  • Attributes:
    Genus:
    Laportea
    Species:
    canadensis
    Family:
    Urticaceae
    Life Cycle:
    Perennial
    Country Or Region Of Origin:
    Central & East Canada to Mexico
    Wildlife Value:
    This is a larval host plant for butterflies. The Eastern Comma (Polygonia comma) appear as overwintered adults from spring until the end of April and they lay eggs. The summer form emerges from May-September and lays the winter form. These adults appear in September and find a location to overwinter for the next year. Red Admiral (Vanessa atalanta) have two broods from March-October, they overwinter from October-March in southern Texas.
  • Whole Plant Traits:
    Plant Type:
    Edible
    Native Plant
    Poisonous
    Habit/Form:
    Erect
  • Cultural Conditions:
    Soil Drainage:
    Occasionally Wet
    NC Region:
    Mountains
    Piedmont
  • Flowers:
    Flower Color:
    Insignificant
    Flower Size:
    < 1 inch
    Flower Description:
    Small and inconspicuous, in axillary clusters
  • Leaves:
    Leaf Color:
    Green
    Leaf Feel:
    Prickly
    Velvety
    Leaf Value To Gardener:
    Edible
    Leaf Type:
    Simple
    Leaf Arrangement:
    Alternate
    Leaf Shape:
    Lanceolate
    Ovate
    Leaf Margin:
    Dentate
    Hairs Present:
    Yes
    Leaf Description:
    Alternate, simple, coarsely toothed; covered in stinging hairs
  • Stem:
    Stem Color:
    Green
    Stem Is Aromatic:
    No
    Stem Surface:
    Hairy (pubescent)
    Stem Description:
    Stinging hairs
  • Landscape:
    Landscape Location:
    Coastal
    Naturalized Area
    Woodland
    Landscape Theme:
    Butterfly Garden
    Pollinator Garden
    Attracts:
    Butterflies
    Pollinators
    Problems:
    Contact Dermatitis
    Poisonous to Humans
  • Poisonous to Humans:
    Poison Severity:
    Medium
    Poison Symptoms:
    SKIN IRRITATION MINOR, OR LASTING ONLY FOR A FEW MINUTES. Contact with the stinging hairs causes intense burning, itching, or stinging lasting usually less than an hour.
    Poison Toxic Principle:
    Mixture of chemicals, not well understood
    Causes Contact Dermatitis:
    Yes
    Poison Part:
    Bark
    Flowers
    Fruits
    Leaves
    Roots
    Stems