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Caladium Caladium

Other Common Name(s):

Other plants called Caladium:

Phonetic Spelling
kah-LAY-dee-um
This plant has medium severity poison characteristics.
See below
Description

Caladiums are a genus of tropical plants with heart-shaped, 6 to 12 inch leaves. Within the genus, there are more than 1000 cultivars that offer foliage colors in red, salmon, rose, white, or green with many variegated combinations. Their flower is a spadix surrounded by a yellow-green spathe. Caladiums prefer a rich soil, constant moisture, and shade and are grown mostly for their interesting foliage display.

Caladiums will perform well in garden borders and containers. You should fertilize them once a month with 8-8-8 (2 lbs per 100 feet). Note that caladiums do not overwinter in North Carolina sustaining damage at temperatures below 65 °F, but you can dig up the tubers in the fall, store them in a dry location at 70 to 75 °F, and replant in the spring after the last chance of frost and the soil has warmed. You should plant them 8 to 12 inches apart and covered with at least an inch of soil. Most Caladium cultivars are adapted to full shade, but some selections tolerate partial sun or early morning sunlight. However, full sun generally reduces the intensity of the foliage color of most cultivars.

This plant is toxic if eaten in large quantities. It can cause severe pain around the mouth, including burning and swelling of the lips and tongue. Ingestion can also cause nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea. Contact with cell sap can cause minor skin irritation that may last several minutes.

Cultivars / Varieties:
Tags:
#red#pink#yellow#poisonous#summer#orange#green#not hardy#shade tolerant#variegated leaves#tuberous#summer bulbs
 
Cultivars / Varieties:
Tags:
#red#pink#yellow#poisonous#summer#orange#green#not hardy#shade tolerant#variegated leaves#tuberous#summer bulbs
  • Attributes:
    Genus:
    Caladium
    Family:
    Araceae
    Life Cycle:
    Bulb
    Recommended Propagation Strategy:
    Division
    Country Or Region Of Origin:
    South America
    Bulb Storage:
    Store them in a dry location at 70 to 75 °F.
  • Whole Plant Traits:
    Plant Type:
    Bulb
    Poisonous
    Leaf Characteristics:
    Broadleaf Evergreen
    Habit/Form:
    Clumping
    Maintenance:
    Medium
  • Cultural Conditions:
    Light:
    Partial Shade (Direct sunlight only part of the day, 2-6 hours)
    Soil Texture:
    High Organic Matter
    Soil Drainage:
    Good Drainage
    Occasionally Wet
    Available Space To Plant:
    Less than 12 inches
    Usda Plant Hardiness Zone:
    9a, 9b, 10a, 10b
  • Flowers:
    Flower Color:
    Green
    Orange
    Pink
    Red/Burgundy
    Flower Value To Gardener:
    Showy
    Flower Bloom Time:
    Summer
    Flower Size:
    1-3 inches
    Flower Description:
    Flower is a spadix surrounded by a yellow-green spathe.
  • Leaves:
    Leaf Characteristics:
    Broadleaf Evergreen
    Leaf Color:
    Gray/Silver
    Green
    Variegated
    White
    Leaf Value To Gardener:
    Showy
    Leaf Type:
    Simple
    Leaf Arrangement:
    Alternate
    Hairs Present:
    No
    Leaf Length:
    > 6 inches
    Leaf Description:
    Heart-shaped, 6 to 12 inch leaves in red, salmon, rose, white, or green with many variegated combination depending on cultivar.
  • Stem:
    Stem Is Aromatic:
    No
  • Landscape:
    Problems:
    Poisonous to Humans
  • Poisonous to Humans:
    Poison Severity:
    Medium
    Poison Symptoms:
    This plant can cause severe pain around the mouth, including burning and swelling of the lips and tongue. Ingestion of large quantities can also cause nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea. Contact with cell sap can cause minor skin irritation that may last several minutes.
    Poison Toxic Principle:
    Calcium oxalate crystals and unidentified compounds.
    Causes Contact Dermatitis:
    Yes
    Poison Part:
    Flowers
    Leaves
    Sap/Juice