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Aster Aster

Other plants called Aster:

Previously known as:

  • Asteromoea
  • Kalimeris
Phonetic Spelling
ASS-ter
Description

Reportedly, there are over 250 different types of asters growing all over the world. Botanists have reclassified this genus after studying the plant's morphology and DNA. The Aster genus is restricted to plants native to Europe and Asia. The species native to North America belong to two other genera, Symphyotrichum and Eurybia. The common name remains Aster for all the genera.

Asters have daisy-like flowers and come in a variety of colors. They are easy to grow and require very little maintenance. They typically bloom in the late summer and fall, and they add color to the garden as the seasons change. The plant is erect and mounding. Its height may range from 6 inches to 8 feet tall with a width of 1 to 3 feet. 

 Asters are a member of the Asteraceae family. The name Aster is Greek, meaning "star," and refers to the appearance of the flowers. 

This genus is native to Eurasia, northwest Africa, Canada, and the northwest United States. 

Depending on the species, the plant may tolerate full sun or prefer partial shade. Some species are more drought-tolerant while others may tolerate more moisture. They prefer rich loamy or clay soils. They may be propagated by seeds, division, root cuttings, or stem cuttings. 

The plant has tuberous roots or woody rhizomes. The stems may be single or multibranched. They have basal and cauline leaves. The leaf shape varies depending on the species. The flowers have disc florets that may be white or yellow. The rays encircle the floret, and their colors vary from white, pink, blue, or purple. The seeds have tufts of bristles that help them to be dispersed by the wind.

Any species or cultivars of this genus would be a lovely addition to any home garden. It may be planted in a container for use on a porch or patio. It will also add color to a cottage garden or border garden. Butterflies and bees will appreciate the flowers, particularly as summer is ending and the evenings are getting cooler.

Insects, Diseases, and Other Problems: The Aster genus has no serious problems. It would be wise to monitor for lace bugs, mites, aphids, and Japanese beetles. Rusts, powdery mildew, downy mildew, leaf spots, and Verticillium wilt can occur.

See this plant in the following landscapes:
Mostly Native Vegetable, Herb and Pollinator Garden
Cultivars / Varieties:
Tags:
#purple#hummingbirds#full sun tolerant#perennials#white flowers#pink flowers#fall interest#summer flowers#wildflower garden#fantz#bird friendly#butterfly friendly#Buncombe County Sun and Shade Garden
 
Cultivars / Varieties:
Tags:
#purple#hummingbirds#full sun tolerant#perennials#white flowers#pink flowers#fall interest#summer flowers#wildflower garden#fantz#bird friendly#butterfly friendly#Buncombe County Sun and Shade Garden
  • Attributes:
    Genus:
    Aster
    Family:
    Asteraceae
    Life Cycle:
    Perennial
    Recommended Propagation Strategy:
    Division
    Seed
    Stem Cutting
    Country Or Region Of Origin:
    Eurasia to Jawa, NW. Africa, Subarctic America to NW. U.S.A
    Distribution:
    Native: Afghanistan, Austria, Baltic States, Belarus, Belgium, Bulgaria, Central European Russia, China North-Central, China South-Central, China Southeast, Czechoslovakia, East European Russia, East Himalaya, France Germany, Great Britain, Greece, Hungary, Inner Mongolia, Iran, Italy, Japan, Korea, Krym, Manchuria, Mongolia, Morocco, Nepal, North European Russia, Norway, Philippines, Poland, Romania, South European Russia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Taiwan, Thailand, Tibet, Turkey, Ukraine, Vietnam, Yugoslavia; Canada--Alberta, British Columbia, Northwest Territories, and Yukon; USA--AK, CO, ID, and WY; Introduced: USA--AL, CT, DE, GA, HI, IL, IA, KY, MA, MI, NJ, NC, OH, PA, RI, TN, and WV; Northwest Russia;
    Wildlife Value:
    The flowers attract butterflies and bees. Deer and rabbits may browse the plants and eat the foliage.
    Play Value:
    Attractive Flowers
    Attracts Pollinators
    Colorful
    Easy to Grow
    Wildlife Food Source
    Dimensions:
    Height: 0 ft. 6 in. - 8 ft. 0 in.
    Width: 1 ft. 0 in. - 3 ft. 0 in.
  • Whole Plant Traits:
    Plant Type:
    Perennial
    Wildflower
    Habit/Form:
    Ascending
    Erect
    Mounding
    Multi-stemmed
    Growth Rate:
    Medium
    Maintenance:
    Low
    Texture:
    Medium
  • Cultural Conditions:
    Light:
    Full sun (6 or more hours of direct sunlight a day)
    Partial Shade (Direct sunlight only part of the day, 2-6 hours)
    Soil Texture:
    Clay
    High Organic Matter
    Loam (Silt)
    Soil pH:
    Acid (<6.0)
    Alkaline (>8.0)
    Neutral (6.0-8.0)
    Soil Drainage:
    Good Drainage
    Moist
    Occasionally Dry
    Occasionally Wet
    NC Region:
    Coastal
    Mountains
    Piedmont
    USDA Plant Hardiness Zone:
    4a, 4b, 5a, 5b, 6b, 6a, 7b, 7a, 8b, 8a
  • Fruit:
    Fruit Color:
    Brown/Copper
    White
    Fruit Type:
    Achene
    Fruit Description:
    The seeds or achenes are ellipsoid or obovoid in shape and have white or brown tufts of hair or pappus. The wind disperses the seeds.
  • Flowers:
    Flower Color:
    Blue
    Gold/Yellow
    Pink
    Purple/Lavender
    Red/Burgundy
    White
    Flower Inflorescence:
    Head
    Flower Value To Gardener:
    Good Cut
    Long Bloom Season
    Long-lasting
    Showy
    Flower Bloom Time:
    Fall
    Summer
    Flower Shape:
    Radial
    Flower Petals:
    7 - 20 petals/rays
    Bracts
    more than 20 petals/rays
    Flower Size:
    1-3 inches
    Flower Description:
    The flowers are daisy-like. The disc florets may be yellow to white. As the flower matures, the disc florets become purplish to reddish-pink. The rays vary in number and may be white, pink, blue, or purple. They bloom from late summer to fall.
  • Leaves:
    Leaf Color:
    Green
    Leaf Feel:
    Rough
    Smooth
    Soft
    Leaf Arrangement:
    Alternate
    Leaf Shape:
    Elliptical
    Lanceolate
    Linear
    Oblanceolate
    Ovate
    Spatulate
    Leaf Margin:
    Crenate
    Entire
    Serrate
    Hairs Present:
    Yes
    Leaf Length:
    1-3 inches
    Leaf Description:
    The plant has basal and cauline leaves. Depending on the species, the leaf shape, margins, and surfaces of the leaf may vary. The leaf shape may be elliptical, lanceolate, linear, oblanceolate, ovate, or spatulate. The margins may be entire, crenate, or serrate. The upper leaf surface may be smooth or hairy.
  • Stem:
    Stem Is Aromatic:
    No
    Stem Surface:
    Hairy (pubescent)
    Stem Description:
    The stems are ascending to erect. They may be singular or branched distally. The stems are usually hairy distally, but they are often smooth proximally.
  • Landscape:
    Landscape Location:
    Container
    Naturalized Area
    Patio
    Small Space
    Walkways
    Landscape Theme:
    Butterfly Garden
    Cottage Garden
    Cutting Garden
    Pollinator Garden
    Design Feature:
    Accent
    Border
    Mass Planting
    Small groups
    Specimen
    Attracts:
    Bees
    Butterflies
    Hummingbirds
    Small Mammals
    Songbirds