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Sambucus canadensis

This plant has poison characteristics. See below.
Common Name(s):
American elder, American elderberry, Elderberry
Cultivar(s):
Rubra , Aurea
Categories:
Native Plants, Poisonous Plants, Shrubs
Comment:

Native shrub attracts birds and butterflies; can be pruned back severely every few years to keep in bounds; loose habit; coarse compound leaves. Can be pruned back severely every few years to keep in bounds; spreads by suckers; found in forest or natural areas in moist, open woods; weedy in disturbed areas in fields, roadsides, ditches.  Plants can be vigorous growers and may need more management to control.

Description:
Deciduous shrubs with soft wood and large, white pith; leaves opposite, pinnately divided with 5-11 leaflets, toothed on the margin; flowers small, white, 3-5-parted, in large umbrella-shaped clusters; fruit a small, purple-black berry
Height:
5-12 ft.
Foliage:
Opposite, compound dark green leaves; 5 to 11 leaflets; sharply serrated; yellow-green fall color
Flower:
6 to 10 in. wide flat cyme of creamy white flowers in summer; edible purplish black fruit in fall
Zones:
4 to 9
Habit:
Deciduous
Site:
Sun; prefers moist soil but tolerates dry sites
Texture:
Medium
Form:
Loose open habit; multi-stemmed; arching, spreading branches; unkept appearance
Exposure:
Sun; moist soil but tolerates dry sites
Fruit:
Flat cluster of creamy white flower in summer; edible purplish black fruit
Family:
Caprifoliaceae
Origin:
USA, NC
Distribution:
Throughout.
Poison Part:
Leaves, twigs (stems), roots, unripe fruits.
Poison Delivery Mode:
Ingestion.
Symptoms:
Nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, coma.
Edibility:
EDIBLE PARTS: Cooked berries edible in pies, pancakes, and jellies; flowers and fruits used in wine making. SAFE HANDLING PROCEDURES: When flowers are open, pick whole clusters and dip in pancake batter and fry, or dip in pancake batter and fry as fritters. Elderberry juice can be used as a cold drink. SOURCE: Peterson, L. 1978/ A Field Guide to Edible Wild Plants. Houghton Mifflin Co., Boston, 330 pp.
Toxic Principle:
Cyanogenic glycoside and alkaloid.
Severity:
CAUSES ONLY LOW TOXICITY IF EATEN.
Found in:
Forest or natural areas in moist, open woods; weedy in disturbed areas in fields, roadsides, ditches.
Tags:
riparian, deciduous, facultative-wetland, wildlife, native

NCCES plant id: 553

Sambucus canadensis Sambucus canadensis
Tom Potterfield, CC BY-NC-SA - 4.0
Sambucus canadensis Sambucus canadensis
Sambucus canadensis Sambucus canadensis
Sambucus canadensis Sambucus canadensis
Sambucus canadensis Sambucus canadensis
Kingsbrae Garden, CC BY-NC-SA - 4.0
Sambucus canadensis Sambucus canadensis
Joshua Mayer, CC BY-SA - 4.0