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Morus rubra 'Travis'

Common Name(s):
Travis red mulberry
Categories:
Edible Plants, Native Plants, Trees
Comment:

Morus rubra 'Travis', commonly called Travis red mulberry is a native tree species and has both edible and ornamental features. It can live up to 125 years but the weedy invasive character is not appealing. It is more cold hardy than black mulberry.

Regions:  Mountain, Piedmont, Coastal Plains

Seasons of Interest: 

   Blooms:  Spring            Nut/Fruit/Seed:  Summer

Wildlife Value:   This plant is moderately resistant to damage from deer.  It is a possible host plant for the Red Admiral butterfly. Its fruits are eaten by many birds, especially gray catbirds and northern mockingbirds, foxes, opossums, raccoons, and squirrels. 

 

Height:
30-70 ft.
Flower:
The small yellowish-green flower of the Travis red mulberry is not showy. Male flower and female flower can bloom on the same tree or different trees.
Zones:
5-10
Habit:
Deciduous
Site:
The Travis red mulberry does well is full-sun or part shade with well-drained soil. It can also adapt to various types of soils, thin, dry, wet or alkaline. This plant is salt tolerant.
Texture:
Medium
Form:
Upright, oval shape
Edibility:
Travis red mulberry produces numerous red to black fruit that looks like a blackberry but slender with a size of 1 1/4''. It is sweet in flavor but can cause purple splotches on driveways or cars. The fruit does not ripen at the same time. It is great for making jelly, wine, and desserts.
Width:
40 ft.
Growth Rate:
Moderate
Leaf:
The Travis red mulberry features alternate broad simple green leaves with a notch at the base, finely serrated margin. The upper surface is rough and under surface is full of soft hair.
Tags:
fruit, deciduous, drought tolerant, birds, edible, butterflies, host, deer resistant

NCCES plant id: 3017

Morus rubra 'Travis' Leaves
Photo by Mary PK Burns, CC BY-NC-2.0
Morus rubra 'Travis' Flower
Photo by Mary PK Burns, CC BY-NC-2.0
Morus rubra 'Travis' Trunk
Photo by Mary PK Burns, CC BY-NC-2.0