Please submit a search term.

Asclepias incarnata

This plant has poison characteristics. See below.
Common Name(s):
Swamp milkweed
Categories:
Herbs, Native Plants, Poisonous Plants, Wildflowers
Comment:

Asclepias incarnata, commonly called swamp milkweed, is an erect, clump-forming, native plant which is commonly found in swamps, river bottomlands, and wet meadows. It typically grows 3-4' tall (less frequently to 5') on branching stems. 

Flowers are followed by attractive seed pods (to 4" long) which split open when ripe releasing silky-haired seeds easily carried by the wind.

In addition, swamp milkweed is an important food source (albeit somewhat less important than upland species of Asclepias) for the larval stage of Monarch butterflies.

Regions:  Mountain, Piedmont, Coastal Plains

Seasons of Interest: 

        Blooms:  Late Summer            Nut/Fruit/Seed:  Fall

Wildlife Value: This plant is highly resistant to damage from deer.  It is a host plant for the Monarch butterfly.  Its flowers are attractive to butterflies and other insects.     

 

Description:
Season:
Early to late summer
Light:
Sun, part shade
Height:
2-5 ft.
Hardiness:
USDA Hardiness Zone 3-6
Foliage:
Swamp milkweed has narrow, opposite, smooth, lance-shaped, taper-pointed leaves that are 3-6" long. The stems exude a toxic milky sap when cut.
Flower:
Swamp milkweed has small, fragrant, pink to mauve flowers (1/4" wide), each with five reflexed petals and an elevated central crown, that appear in tight clusters (umbels) at the stem ends in summer. The flowers are uncommonly white.
Zones:
3-6
Habit:
Deciduous
Site:
Swamp milkweed is easily grown in medium to wet soils in full sun. It is surprisingly tolerant of average well-drained soils in cultivation even though the species is native to swamps and wet meadows. The plants have deep taproots and are best left undisturbed once established. The foliage is slow to emerge in spring.
Exposure:
Sun
Family:
Apocynaceae
Poison Part:
All parts
Poison Delivery Mode:
Ingestion
Symptoms:
Vomiting, stupor, weakness, spasms
Toxic Principle:
Cardiac glycosides and resinoids
Severity:
TOXIC ONLY IF LARGE QUANTITIES EATEN.
Found in:
Weedy in disturbed areas, native or naturalized in waste places, roadsides, fields; landscape in flower gardens as herbaceous perennials
Life Cycle:
Perennial
Tags:
pink, riparian, obligate wetland, pollinator, fragrant, pollinator plant, swampy, summer, native plant, butterflies, showy

NCCES plant id: 2485

Asclepias incarnata Asclepias incarnata
Joshua Mayer, CC-BY-SA-2.0
Asclepias incarnata Asclepias incarnata
myiarchus22, CC BY-NC-2.0
Asclepias incarnata Asclepias incarnata
Brett Whaley, CC BY-NC-2.0
Asclepias incarnata Asclepias incarnata
Frank Mayfield, CC-BY-SA-2.0
Asclepias incarnata Asclepias incarnata
Eleanor, CC BY-NC-2.0