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Similar but less problematic plants:
Anemone Anemone
Plants that fill a similar niche:
Ocimum basilicum Ocimum basilicum
Trillium undulatum Trillium undulatum
Trillium erectum Flowers
Adonis aestivalis has some common insect problems:
Aphids Found on Flowers and Foliage
Slugs and Snails Found on Flowers and Foliage

Summer Adonis Adonis aestivalis

Previously known as:

  • Adonis ambigua
  • Adonis maculata
  • Adonis miniata
Phonetic Spelling
ah-DON-iss ae-stih-VAH-lis
This plant has low severity poison characteristics.
See below
Description

Pheasant's Eye is an annual which originated in the Mediterranean Basin and western Asia. In some locations, it grows as a perennial.  The name Pheasant's Eye refers to the likeness between the colors of its flowers to the red eye of a pheasant.  The genus Adonis is a member of the Ranunculaceae or buttercup family.  According to Greek mythology, Adonis was a handsome young man who was loved by Aphrodite.  He was killed by a wild boar. His blood is said to produce the red flowers of this species.  Aestivalis is Latin and translated means "of the summer." 

Pheasant's Eye was brought to the US as a horticultural plant but escaped cultivation.  It has become invasive in the western US and has become a weed of pastures and roadsides.  The plant is tap rooted with erect, columnar, branched, and leafy stems averaging 8-24 inches tall.  The typical plant width is 6 to 12 inches.

The flowers are small and buttercup-like ranging in color from red purple, scarlet red, orange, or yellow.  The flower has a dark purple blotch in the center of most species as well as dark purple anthers and stamens. The leaves are soft green, feathery, and fern-like.  Pheasant's Eye blooms from May to July. 

Seeds may germinate immediately after shedding or wait until the following spring. If seeds are sown, they should be planted a depth of 1/16 inch or surface sow and spaced 8 to 12 inches apart.  The species has both male and female organs.  It can be pollinated by bees, flies, and beetles. 

 

Insects, Diseases and Other Plant Problems:  Aphids may attack flowers.   The plant is poisonous to humans, horses, cattle, sheep, and pigs if ingested. Plant may be damaged by slugs. Small plants may need support in windy areas.

 

 

 

 

See this plant in the following landscape:
Cultivars / Varieties:
Tags:
#red#deciduous#poisonous#annual#orange#perennial#weed#red flowers#weedy#orange flowers#herb garden#herbaceous#herbaceous perennial#cutting garden#herbaceous annual#perennial weed#herb#wildflower
 
Cultivars / Varieties:
Tags:
#red#deciduous#poisonous#annual#orange#perennial#weed#red flowers#weedy#orange flowers#herb garden#herbaceous#herbaceous perennial#cutting garden#herbaceous annual#perennial weed#herb#wildflower
  • Attributes:
    Genus:
    Adonis
    Species:
    aestivalis
    Family:
    Ranunculaceae
    Life Cycle:
    Annual
    Perennial
    Recommended Propagation Strategy:
    Seed
    Country Or Region Of Origin:
    Mediterranean Basin and western Asia
    Distribution:
    CA, CO, ID, MO, OR, UT, WA
    Wildlife Value:
    The flowers are pollinated by bees, flies and beetles.
    Play Value:
    Attracts Pollinators
    Dimensions:
    Height: 0 ft. 8 in. - 2 ft. 0 in.
    Width: 0 ft. 6 in. - 1 ft. 0 in.
  • Whole Plant Traits:
    Plant Type:
    Annual
    Herb
    Perennial
    Poisonous
    Wildflower
    Habit/Form:
    Columnar
    Erect
    Maintenance:
    Low
    Texture:
    Fine
  • Cultural Conditions:
    Light:
    Full sun (6 or more hours of direct sunlight a day)
    Partial Shade (Direct sunlight only part of the day, 2-6 hours)
    Soil Texture:
    Clay
    Loam (Silt)
    Sand
    Shallow Rocky
    Soil pH:
    Alkaline (>8.0)
    Soil Drainage:
    Good Drainage
    Moist
    Occasionally Dry
    Available Space To Plant:
    Less than 12 inches
    NC Region:
    Mountains
    Piedmont
    USDA Plant Hardiness Zone:
    3a, 3b, 4b, 4a, 5a, 5b, 6a, 6b, 7b, 7a
  • Fruit:
    Fruit Color:
    Green
    Fruit Value To Gardener:
    Good Cut
    Display/Harvest Time:
    Summer
    Fruit Type:
    Achene
    Fruit Length:
    < 1 inch
    Fruit Width:
    < 1 inch
    Fruit Description:
    After the flower fades in the summer, an erect, elongated cluster of green cone shaped seed pods are produced. The oblong spike has about 10-15 achenes. One plant can produce 114 seeds.
  • Flowers:
    Flower Color:
    Gold/Yellow
    Orange
    Red/Burgundy
    Flower Inflorescence:
    Solitary
    Flower Bloom Time:
    Spring
    Summer
    Flower Shape:
    Cup
    Flower Petals:
    7 - 20 petals/rays
    Flower Size:
    1-3 inches
    Flower Description:
    The small solitary flower emerges on the stem with buttercup-like waxy petals in colors of bright red-purple, scarlet, orange or yellow. Some species have a dark purple basal blotch in the center. The flower has purple-black colored anthers.
  • Leaves:
    Leaf Color:
    Green
    Leaf Type:
    Compound (Pinnately , Bipinnately, Palmately)
    Simple
    Leaf Arrangement:
    Alternate
    Leaf Shape:
    Pinnatifid
    Hairs Present:
    No
    Leaf Length:
    1-3 inches
    Leaf Width:
    < 1 inch
    Leaf Description:
    The feathery-like simple leaves are alternate and divided pinnately 2-3 times which dissect into linear segments giving a feathery-like appearance. They resemble fern or fennel leaves.
  • Stem:
    Stem Color:
    Green
    Stem Is Aromatic:
    No
    Stem Form:
    Straight
    Stem Surface:
    Smooth (glabrous)
    Stem Description:
    The sparsely branched stem is light green, erect and grooved. It is 8 to 24" tall.
  • Landscape:
    Landscape Location:
    Container
    Slope/Bank
    Small Space
    Walkways
    Landscape Theme:
    Cottage Garden
    Cutting Garden
    Pollinator Garden
    Rock Garden
    Design Feature:
    Barrier
    Border
    Mass Planting
    Small groups
    Attracts:
    Bees
    Pollinators
    Problems:
    Poisonous to Humans
    Problem for Children
    Problem for Horses
  • Poisonous to Humans:
    Poison Severity:
    Low
    Poison Symptoms:
    Poisonous if ingested (all parts are poisonous). CAUSES ONLY LOW TOXICITY IF EATEN. Symptoms include nausea and vomiting.
    Poison Toxic Principle:
    Digitalis-like glycoside and possibly protoanemonin
    Causes Contact Dermatitis:
    No
    Poison Part:
    Bark
    Flowers
    Fruits
    Leaves
    Roots
    Sap/Juice
    Seeds
    Stems