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Acer davidii

Phonetic Spelling
AY-ser duh-VID-ee-eye
Description

Snakebark Maple is a small to medium understory tree native to China and Myanmar growing 30 to 50 feet tall and 20 to 40 feet wide. It is often shorter and multi-trunked with arching branches and a spreading crown. Snakebark Maple is part of a group of trees known for the striped look of the bark. This feature is usually lost as they age. This tree has excellent fall color.

It prefers partial shade, especially in the south as it is a cool summer tree. Plant in average, well-drained moist soils for use in the landscape. It may be difficult to find in the USA.

 

 

See this plant in the following landscape:
Cultivars / Varieties:
  • 'Canton'
    Purplish hue to the striped bark
  • 'Ernest Wilson'
  • 'George Forrest'
    Large leaves, dark red young shoots
  • 'Serpentine'
    Small narrow leaves
'Canton', 'Ernest Wilson', 'George Forrest', 'Serpentine'
Tags:
#deciduous#fall color#small tree#shade tree#partial shade#wildlife plant#moths#deciduous shrub#winter interest#street tree#showy bark#nighttime garden#larval host plant#deciduous tree#pollinator garden#moth larva#imperial moth
 
Cultivars / Varieties:
  • 'Canton'
    Purplish hue to the striped bark
  • 'Ernest Wilson'
  • 'George Forrest'
    Large leaves, dark red young shoots
  • 'Serpentine'
    Small narrow leaves
'Canton', 'Ernest Wilson', 'George Forrest', 'Serpentine'
Tags:
#deciduous#fall color#small tree#shade tree#partial shade#wildlife plant#moths#deciduous shrub#winter interest#street tree#showy bark#nighttime garden#larval host plant#deciduous tree#pollinator garden#moth larva#imperial moth
  • Attributes:
    Genus:
    Acer
    Species:
    davidii
    Family:
    Sapindaceae
    Life Cycle:
    Woody
    Country Or Region Of Origin:
    China to Myanmar
    Wildlife Value:
    Members of the genus Acer support Imperial Moth (Eacles imperialis) larvae which have one brood per season and appear from April-October in the south. Adult Imperial Moths do not feed.
    Dimensions:
    Height: 30 ft. 0 in. - 50 ft. 0 in.
    Width: 20 ft. 0 in. - 40 ft. 0 in.
  • Whole Plant Traits:
    Plant Type:
    Shrub
    Tree
    Woody Plant Leaf Characteristics:
    Deciduous
    Habit/Form:
    Arching
    Multi-trunked
    Spreading
    Growth Rate:
    Rapid
    Maintenance:
    Medium
  • Cultural Conditions:
    Light:
    Partial Shade (Direct sunlight only part of the day, 2-6 hours)
    Soil Texture:
    Clay
    Loam (Silt)
    Sand
    Soil pH:
    Neutral (6.0-8.0)
    Soil Drainage:
    Good Drainage
    Moist
    Occasionally Dry
    NC Region:
    Mountains
    USDA Plant Hardiness Zone:
    5b, 5a, 6b, 6a, 7b, 7a
  • Fruit:
    Display/Harvest Time:
    Summer
    Fruit Type:
    Samara
    Fruit Description:
    Winged nutlet produced in profusion
  • Flowers:
    Flower Color:
    Gold/Yellow
    Flower Inflorescence:
    Catkin
    Insignificant
    Flower Bloom Time:
    Spring
    Flower Description:
    Yellowish male catkins in spring.
  • Leaves:
    Woody Plant Leaf Characteristics:
    Deciduous
    Leaf Color:
    Green
    Deciduous Leaf Fall Color:
    Gold/Yellow
    Orange
    Red/Burgundy
    Leaf Arrangement:
    Opposite
    Leaf Shape:
    Ovate
    Leaf Margin:
    Doubly Serrate
    Serrate
    Hairs Present:
    No
    Leaf Length:
    3-6 inches
    Leaf Description:
    3-6 inch long ovate dark green leaves are mostly unlobed or weakly 3-lobed and have serrated to doubly-serrated margins. Undersides are paler. Excellent yellow, orange and red fall color.
  • Bark:
    Bark Color:
    Green
    Light Brown
    Light Gray
    White
    Bark Description:
    The green smooth bark is streaked with green and white. Becomes dull grey-brown at the base of mature trees.
  • Stem:
    Stem Is Aromatic:
    No
  • Landscape:
    Landscape Location:
    Lawn
    Landscape Theme:
    Asian Garden
    Nighttime Garden
    Pollinator Garden
    Design Feature:
    Shade Tree
    Small groups
    Small Tree
    Street Tree
    Understory Tree
    Attracts:
    Moths
    Pollinators