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Blackjack Oak Quercus marilandica

Other Common Name(s):

Phonetic Spelling
KWER-kus mar-i-LAND-ih-ka
This plant has low severity poison characteristics.
See below
Description

Blackjack Oak is a native medium-sized tree or shrub found in central and eastern USA and all areas of NC except the higher elevations.  It is found in fields, woodland edges and dry ridges of barren areas. It grows 30 -50 feet tall with a short trunk and multiple contorted branches and a rounded crown. It is often found in areas where other trees will not grow due to poor soil.

Blackjack Oak prefers average to dry well-drained soils in full sun. They do not tolerate poorly drained soils. This tree is rarely used in the landscape and is best in naturalized or woodland settings.

See this plant in the following landscape:
Cultivars / Varieties:
Tags:
#contorted trunk#sun#deciduous#drought tolerant#wildlife plant#slow growing#native tree#moths#low maintenance#NC native#wild turkeys#acorns#nighttime garden#long lifespan#poor soils tolerant#larval host plant#deciduous tree#mammals#butterfly friendly#pollinator garden#problem for horses#moth larva#banded hairstreak butterfly#gray hairstreak butterfly#imperial moth#juvenal’s duskywing butterfly#edward’s hairstreak butterfly#white-m hairstreak butterfly#horace’s duskywing butterfly
 
Cultivars / Varieties:
Tags:
#contorted trunk#sun#deciduous#drought tolerant#wildlife plant#slow growing#native tree#moths#low maintenance#NC native#wild turkeys#acorns#nighttime garden#long lifespan#poor soils tolerant#larval host plant#deciduous tree#mammals#butterfly friendly#pollinator garden#problem for horses#moth larva#banded hairstreak butterfly#gray hairstreak butterfly#imperial moth#juvenal’s duskywing butterfly#edward’s hairstreak butterfly#white-m hairstreak butterfly#horace’s duskywing butterfly
  • Attributes:
    Genus:
    Quercus
    Species:
    marilandica
    Family:
    Fagaceae
    Uses (Ethnobotany):
    Wood is used to make charcoal
    Life Cycle:
    Woody
    Recommended Propagation Strategy:
    Seed
    Country Or Region Of Origin:
    Central and eastern U.S.A.
    Distribution:
    AL , AR , DC , DE , FL , GA , IA , IL , IN , KS , KY , LA , MD , MO , MS , NC , NE , NJ , NY , OH , OK , PA , SC , TN , TX , VA , WV
    Fire Risk Rating:
    medium flammability
    Wildlife Value:
    Oak trees support a wide variety of Lepidopteran. You may see Imperial Moth (Eacles imperialis) larvae which have one brood per season and appear from April-October in the south. Adult Imperial Moths do not feed. Banded Hairstreak (Satyrium calanus), which have one flight from June-August everywhere but Florida where they emerge April-May. Edward's Hairstreak (Satyrium edwardsii), has one flight from May-July in the south and June-July in the north. Gray Hairstreak (Strymon melinus), has three to four flights in the south from February-November and two flights in the north from May-September. White-M Hairstreak (Parrhasius m-album) has three broods in the north from February-October. Horace’s Duskywing (Erynnis horatius) has three broods in Texas and the deep south from January-November, and two broods in the north from April-September. Juvenal’s Duskywing (Erynnis juvenalis) has one brood from April-June, appearing as early as January in Florida. Game birds and mammals eat the acorns. Birds and mammals use it for nesting.
    Dimensions:
    Height: 30 ft. 0 in. - 50 ft. 0 in.
    Width: 20 ft. 0 in. - 40 ft. 0 in.
  • Whole Plant Traits:
    Plant Type:
    Native Plant
    Tree
    Woody Plant Leaf Characteristics:
    Deciduous
    Habit/Form:
    Rounded
    Growth Rate:
    Slow
    Maintenance:
    Low
    Texture:
    Medium
  • Cultural Conditions:
    Light:
    Full sun (6 or more hours of direct sunlight a day)
    Soil Texture:
    Clay
    Loam (Silt)
    Sand
    Shallow Rocky
    Soil pH:
    Acid (<6.0)
    Soil Drainage:
    Good Drainage
    Occasionally Dry
    Occasionally Wet
    Available Space To Plant:
    12-24 feet
    24-60 feet
    NC Region:
    Coastal
    Mountains
    Piedmont
    USDA Plant Hardiness Zone:
    6b, 6a, 7b, 7a, 8b, 8a, 9b, 9a
  • Fruit:
    Fruit Color:
    Brown/Copper
    Fruit Value To Gardener:
    Showy
    Display/Harvest Time:
    Fall
    Winter
    Fruit Type:
    Nut
    Fruit Length:
    < 1 inch
    Fruit Description:
    Up to 1 inch long striated, light brown acorn. The cap covers about half of the nut and is covered with loose, hairy scales.
  • Flowers:
    Flower Color:
    Gold/Yellow
    Green
    Flower Inflorescence:
    Catkin
    Insignificant
    Flower Bloom Time:
    Spring
    Flower Description:
    Yellow-green male catkins. Female flowers short spikes.
  • Leaves:
    Woody Plant Leaf Characteristics:
    Deciduous
    Leaf Color:
    Brown/Copper
    Green
    Leaf Feel:
    Leathery
    Deciduous Leaf Fall Color:
    Brown/Copper
    Gold/Yellow
    Red/Burgundy
    Leaf Type:
    Simple
    Leaf Arrangement:
    Alternate
    Leaf Shape:
    Obovate
    Leaf Margin:
    Lobed
    Hairs Present:
    Yes
    Leaf Length:
    > 6 inches
    Leaf Width:
    3-6 inches
    Leaf Description:
    4-8" long by 2½–6" across wedge-shaped green leaves are hairy and brown or orangish underneath. 3 poorly defined bristle tipped lobes near the end of the leaf. Red, yellow or brown fall color.
  • Bark:
    Bark Color:
    Black
    Dark Brown
    Surface/Attachment:
    Bumpy
    Bark Plate Shape:
    Rectangle
    Bark Description:
    Dark rough bark in rectangular plates may appear black.
  • Stem:
    Stem Color:
    Brown/Copper
    Stem Is Aromatic:
    No
    Stem Buds:
    Hairy
    Stem Description:
    Stout, dark brown and hairy stems. Reddish-brown buds are 1/4 inch long, sharp, angled and fuzzy.
  • Landscape:
    Landscape Location:
    Naturalized Area
    Woodland
    Landscape Theme:
    Butterfly Garden
    Drought Tolerant Garden
    Native Garden
    Nighttime Garden
    Pollinator Garden
    Attracts:
    Butterflies
    Moths
    Pollinators
    Small Mammals
    Resistance To Challenges:
    Drought
    Dry Soil
    Poor Soil
    Problems:
    Problem for Horses
  • Poisonous to Humans:
    Poison Severity:
    Low
    Poison Symptoms:
    Stomach pain, constipation and later bloody diarrhea, excessive thirst and urination if uncooked leaves or fruit are eaten.
    Poison Toxic Principle:
    Gallotannins, quercitrin, and quercitin
    Causes Contact Dermatitis:
    No
    Poison Part:
    Fruits
    Leaves