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Oxalis Oxalis grandis

Other Common Name(s):

Other plants called Oxalis:

Phonetic Spelling
oks-AL-iss GRAN-dees
This plant has low severity poison characteristics.
See below
Description

Annual or perennial herbs; leaves long-stalked with 3 leaflets; flowers 5-parted, white, yellow, lavender, or rose; fruit a capsule.

Site: Woods

Poison Part: All parts.

Poison Delivery Mode: Ingestion, but no documented cases in humans.

Severity: CAUSES ONLY LOW TOXICITY IF EATEN.

Found in: Houseplant or interiorscape; weedy in disturbed areas, lawns; landscape in flower gardens as herbaceous perennial.

More information on Oxalis.

See this plant in the following landscape:
Cultivars / Varieties:
Tags:
#problem for cats#problem for dogs#problem for horses
 
Cultivars / Varieties:
Tags:
#problem for cats#problem for dogs#problem for horses
  • Attributes:
    Genus:
    Oxalis
    Species:
    grandis
    Family:
    Oxalidaceae
    Edibility:
    EDIBLE PARTS: Small amounts of leaves, flowers, seeds, tubers/roots eaten raw are not dangerous. Leaves, flowers, seeds, tubers/
  • Whole Plant Traits:
    Plant Type:
    Poisonous
    Wildflower
  • Flowers:
    Flower Petals:
    4-5 petals/rays
    Flower Size:
    < 1 inch
    Flower Description:
    Up to 1 in. yellow flowers; five sepals and petals
  • Leaves:
    Leaf Color:
    Gold/Yellow
    Green
    Hairs Present:
    No
    Leaf Length:
    1-3 inches
    Leaf Description:
    Compound leaf with three 1-2 in. leaflets edged with thin maroon line; inversely heart-shaped leaflets; long-stalked
  • Stem:
    Stem Is Aromatic:
    No
  • Landscape:
    Problems:
    Problem for Cats
    Problem for Dogs
    Problem for Horses
  • Poisonous to Humans:
    Poison Severity:
    Low
    Poison Symptoms:
    All parts of the plant have toxic potential, although the possibility of serious effects is usually limited to ingestions of large quantities. Consuming Oxalis species can produce colic in horses, and kidney failure is possible if significant amounts are eaten. Caution: large quantities may cause trembling, cramps, and staggering as in grazing animals.
    Poison Toxic Principle:
    Soluble calcium oxylates
    Causes Contact Dermatitis:
    No
    Poison Part:
    Bark
    Flowers
    Fruits
    Leaves
    Roots
    Sap/Juice
    Seeds
    Stems