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Lilium regale

This plant has medium severity poison characteristics.
See below
Description

The regal lily is a perennial bulb in the lily family (Liliaceae). It is native to the western Sichuan Province in southwestern China. In its native environment, it is only found within a 30-mile section of rocky cliffs in a narrow valley in the Hengduan Mountains. It was introduced in 1903 by Ernest Henry Wilson who was nicknamed “lily limp” due to the leg injury he encountered when he found it during a 1910 landslide. The genus name is Latin for lily, and the specific epithet means regal. It is placed in the Trumpet Lily group.

It prefers rich, organic soils, but is easily grown in any soil that is well-drained in full sun or part shade. It is drought-tolerant and flourishes with good moisture year-round. It is 3 to 6 feet tall and up to 2 feet wide. For an optimum display, plant at least three bulbs. Keep the roots cool with mulch. The bulbs can be divided and moved in the fall or winter. In areas with heavy soil and wet winters, plant the bulbs in early spring. For other areas, they can be planted in the winter. In hot and humid environments, plant the bulbs in raised beds to avoid fungal problems. The regal lily bulb is hardy. However, the early spring foliage is vulnerable to a late frost. It is advisable to stake the stems to prevent breakage by wind.

The regal lily is a long-lasting fragrant flower with large white trumpets. It is the earliest lily to bloom in July or August. Each stem can have 25 flowers. If you cut them, leave at least one-third of the stem. The plant is toxic to cats and can be fatal.

The bulbs can be grown in 3-gallon containers. They can be grouped in a perennial bed or near an area where their fragrance can be enjoyed. The regal lily can be mixed with annuals, perennials, and other lily species to cover the greenery after flowering. The mixed plants will also provide shade for the regal lily roots.

The regal lily received the Award of Garden Merit of Royal Horticultural Society in 1993.

Insects, Diseases, and Other Plant Problems: Lily leaf beetles, mites slugs snails and aphids attack the plant. Rodents, deer, and rabbits eat the plant (including the bulb).

VIDEO Created by Elisabeth Meyer for "Edibles, Bulbs, and Houseplants" a plant identification course offered in partnership with Longwood Gardens.   

Profile Video:
See this plant in the following landscape:
Cultivars / Varieties:
  • L. 'Album'
    Pure white flowers
L. 'Album'
Tags:
#bulb#showy flowers#poisonous#fragrant flowers#mass planting#deer browsing plant#large flowers#long bloom time#border middle#butterfly friendly#problem for cats#container plant#full sun#partial shade
 
Cultivars / Varieties:
  • L. 'Album'
    Pure white flowers
L. 'Album'
Tags:
#bulb#showy flowers#poisonous#fragrant flowers#mass planting#deer browsing plant#large flowers#long bloom time#border middle#butterfly friendly#problem for cats#container plant#full sun#partial shade
  • Attributes:
    Genus:
    Lilium
    Species:
    regale
    Family:
    Liliaceae
    Life Cycle:
    Bulb
    Recommended Propagation Strategy:
    Division
    Seed
    Country Or Region Of Origin:
    Western Sichuan Province in south-central China
    Wildlife Value:
    Attracts bees, butterflies, and hummingbirds. It is a favorite of yellow swallowtail butterflies.
    Dimensions:
    Height: 3 ft. 0 in. - 6 ft. 0 in.
    Width: 0 ft. 9 in. - 2 ft. 0 in.
  • Whole Plant Traits:
    Plant Type:
    Bulb
    Herbaceous Perennial
    Poisonous
    Habit/Form:
    Erect
    Growth Rate:
    Medium
    Maintenance:
    Medium
    Texture:
    Medium
  • Cultural Conditions:
    Light:
    Full sun (6 or more hours of direct sunlight a day)
    Partial Shade (Direct sunlight only part of the day, 2-6 hours)
    Soil Texture:
    Clay
    Loam (Silt)
    Sand
    Soil pH:
    Acid (<6.0)
    Neutral (6.0-8.0)
    Soil Drainage:
    Good Drainage
    Available Space To Plant:
    Less than 12 inches
    NC Region:
    Coastal
    Mountains
    Piedmont
    USDA Plant Hardiness Zone:
    4a, 4b, 5a, 5b, 6a, 6b, 7a, 7b, 8a, 8b
  • Fruit:
    Fruit Color:
    Cream/Tan
    Display/Harvest Time:
    Summer
    Fruit Type:
    Capsule
    Fruit Length:
    < 1 inch
    Fruit Width:
    < 1 inch
  • Flowers:
    Flower Color:
    Pink
    Purple/Lavender
    White
    Flower Inflorescence:
    Umbel
    Flower Value To Gardener:
    Fragrant
    Good Cut
    Long-lasting
    Showy
    Flower Bloom Time:
    Summer
    Flower Shape:
    Trumpet
    Flower Petals:
    6 petals/rays
    Flower Size:
    3-6 inches
    Flower Description:
    The 6-inch trumpet-shaped flower is pink-purple on the outside and white inside with a yellow throat. The outward facing flower blooms in July. Each stem can have up to 25 fragrant flowers. The flowers are usually more fragrant at night.
  • Leaves:
    Leaf Color:
    Green
    Leaf Feel:
    Rough
    Leaf Type:
    Simple
    Leaf Arrangement:
    Alternate
    Leaf Shape:
    Linear
    Leaf Margin:
    Entire
    Hairs Present:
    No
    Leaf Length:
    1-3 inches
    Leaf Width:
    < 1 inch
    Leaf Description:
    There are numerous linear-shaped leaves scattered at irregular intervals along the stem.
  • Stem:
    Stem Color:
    Green
    Purple/Lavender
    Stem Is Aromatic:
    No
    Stem Cross Section:
    Round
    Stem Form:
    Straight
    Stem Surface:
    Polished
    Stem Description:
    When cutting the flowers, leave at least 1/3 of the stalk.
  • Landscape:
    Landscape Location:
    Container
    Patio
    Walkways
    Landscape Theme:
    Butterfly Garden
    Children's Garden
    Cottage Garden
    Garden for the Blind
    Pollinator Garden
    Design Feature:
    Border
    Mass Planting
    Attracts:
    Butterflies
    Resistance To Challenges:
    Drought
    Heat
    Problems:
    Poisonous to Humans
    Problem for Cats
    Problem for Children
  • Poisonous to Humans:
    Poison Severity:
    Medium
    Poison Symptoms:
    Excessive drooling, vomiting, loss of appetite
    Poison Toxic Principle:
    unknown
    Causes Contact Dermatitis:
    No
    Poison Part:
    Flowers
    Fruits
    Leaves
    Seeds
    Stems