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Lamium amplexicaule

Phonetic Spelling
LAY-mee-um am-pleks-ih-KAW-lee
Description

The common name, Henbit, comes from the observation that chickens like it. Hummingbirds also enjoy this wild edible for the nectar. Henbit provides valuable erosion control in many cropland fields in the southern U.S. Unlike many of its relatives in the mint family, henbit does not have a strong or distinctive mint scent. Henbit is easily confused with Purple Deadnettle (L. purpureum), which has petioled leaves all the way to the top leaves. The middle and upper leaves of L. amplexicaule (Henbit) do not have petioles. Henbit leaves are also typically smaller than those of Purple Deadnettle. Henbit is an important early-season source of nectar and pollen for honeybees.  Introduced from Europe. The leaves, stem, and flowers of the plant are edible and have a slightly sweet and peppery flavor, similar to celery. Henbit can be eaten raw or cooked.

Cultivars / Varieties:
Tags:
#hummingbirds#weed#wildlife plant#weedy#nectar plant#winter annual weed#erosion control#cool season weed
 
Cultivars / Varieties:
Tags:
#hummingbirds#weed#wildlife plant#weedy#nectar plant#winter annual weed#erosion control#cool season weed
  • Attributes:
    Genus:
    Lamium
    Species:
    amplexicaule
    Family:
    Lamiaceae
    Life Cycle:
    Annual
    Recommended Propagation Strategy:
    Seed
    Country Or Region Of Origin:
    Europe
    Wildlife Value:
    Nectar attracts hummingbirds.
  • Whole Plant Traits:
    Plant Type:
    Weed
    Wildflower
  • Flowers:
    Flower Color:
    Pink
    Purple/Lavender
    Flower Bloom Time:
    Spring
    Summer
    Flower Description:
    Two-lipped hairy lavender flowers whorled around the squarest; upper lip is concave
  • Leaves:
    Leaf Arrangement:
    Opposite
    Leaf Shape:
    Cordate
    Hairs Present:
    Yes
    Leaf Length:
    1-3 inches
    Leaf Description:
    The leaves are in opposite pairs, often with long internodes. The lower leaves are stalked and the upper ones stalkless, often fused, and clasping the stems. The blades are hairy and kidney-shaped, with rounded teeth. stem; .5-1.5" opposite, scalloped and rounded leaves; lower leaves have a long stalk; upper leaves are half clasping
  • Stem:
    Stem Is Aromatic:
    No
    Stem Cross Section:
    Square
  • Landscape:
    Landscape Location:
    Lawn
    Attracts:
    Hummingbirds
    Resistance To Challenges:
    Erosion
    Problems:
    Weedy