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Ficus carica 'Magnolia'

Common Name(s):

Phonetic Spelling
FY-kus KAIR-ih-kuh
This plant has low severity poison characteristics.
See below
Description

Magnolia fig is a common variety in the southeastern United States and is cold hardy down to 50 degrees. Self-pollinating. It can be grown in a container.

 

VIDEO Created by Elisabeth Meyer for "Edibles, Bulbs, and Houseplants" a plant identification course offered in partnership with Longwood Gardens.   

More information on Ficus carica.

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Cultivars / Varieties:
Tags:
#deciduous#cpp#figs#edible fruits#problem for cats#problem for dogs#problem for horses#container plants
 
Cultivars / Varieties:
Tags:
#deciduous#cpp#figs#edible fruits#problem for cats#problem for dogs#problem for horses#container plants
  • Attributes:
    Genus:
    Ficus
    Species:
    carica
    Family:
    Moraceae
    Life Cycle:
    Woody
    Recommended Propagation Strategy:
    Layering
    Stem Cutting
    Wildlife Value:
    Insects, wasps and birds eat the fruit
    Play Value:
    Edible fruit
    Wildlife Food Source
    Edibility:
    This is probably the largest fig available on the market. The asymmetric fruit has a bronze skin and an amber flesh. Ripens from mid-July through August. Pick fruit as early as possible because of the open ostiole or it would split and turn sour easily. Magnolia is best suited for preserving.
    Dimensions:
    Height: 4 ft. 0 in. - 10 ft. 0 in.
    Width: 6 ft. 0 in. - 12 ft. 0 in.
  • Whole Plant Traits:
    Plant Type:
    Edible
    Shrub
    Woody Plant Leaf Characteristics:
    Deciduous
    Habit/Form:
    Erect
    Multi-stemmed
    Rounded
    Spreading
    Growth Rate:
    Medium
    Maintenance:
    Medium
    Texture:
    Coarse
  • Cultural Conditions:
    Light:
    Full sun (6 or more hours of direct sunlight a day)
    Partial Shade (Direct sunlight only part of the day, 2-6 hours)
    Soil Texture:
    High Organic Matter
    Soil pH:
    Acid (<6.0)
    Neutral (6.0-8.0)
    Soil Drainage:
    Good Drainage
    Moist
    Available Space To Plant:
    6-feet-12 feet
    NC Region:
    Coastal
    Piedmont
    USDA Plant Hardiness Zone:
    7a, 7b, 8b, 8a, 9a, 9b, 10a, 10b, 11b, 11a
  • Fruit:
    Fruit Color:
    Brown/Copper
    Red/Burgundy
    Fruit Value To Gardener:
    Edible
    Good Dried
    Display/Harvest Time:
    Fall
    Summer
    Fruit Length:
    1-3 inches
    Fruit Width:
    1-3 inches
    Fruit Description:
    The infructescence is a ripened receptacle (syconium), not an ovary, that forms in late summer or fall on new wood. The large, asymmetric fruit has a bronze skin and an amber flesh. Ripens from mid-July through August. Fruits develop without the need for cross pollination.
  • Flowers:
    Flower Color:
    Green
    Flower Inflorescence:
    Insignificant
    Flower Bloom Time:
    Spring
    Flower Size:
    < 1 inch
    Flower Description:
    Magnolia Fig has minute, petalless flowers that are in the stem tip on the leaf axils.
  • Leaves:
    Woody Plant Leaf Characteristics:
    Deciduous
    Leaf Color:
    Green
    Leaf Feel:
    Rough
    Smooth
    Soft
    Leaf Type:
    Simple
    Leaf Arrangement:
    Alternate
    Leaf Shape:
    Palmatifid
    Leaf Margin:
    Entire
    Lobed
    Hairs Present:
    No
    Leaf Length:
    > 6 inches
    Leaf Width:
    3-6 inches
    Leaf Description:
    The green leaves are large and thick, are 5-10 inches long and 4-7 inches across and deeply, palmately lobed with three to five sinuses lobed. The upper surface is green and rough with hairs and the underside is paler and smooth.
  • Bark:
    Bark Color:
    Light Gray
    Surface/Attachment:
    Smooth
    Bark Description:
    Silver gray smooth bark becomes more bumpy with age.
  • Stem:
    Stem Color:
    Brown/Copper
    Stem Is Aromatic:
    No
    Stem Bud Terminal:
    Only 1 terminal bud, larger than side buds
    Stem Form:
    Straight
  • Landscape:
    Landscape Location:
    Coastal
    Container
    Naturalized Area
    Walkways
    Woodland
    Landscape Theme:
    Edible Garden
    Design Feature:
    Specimen
    Attracts:
    Songbirds
    Resistance To Challenges:
    Salt
    Problems:
    Contact Dermatitis
    Problem for Cats
    Problem for Dogs
    Problem for Horses
  • Poisonous to Humans:
    Poison Severity:
    Low
    Poison Symptoms:
    Phytophotodermatitis from the white, milky sap.
    Poison Toxic Principle:
    Furanocoumarins
    Causes Contact Dermatitis:
    Yes
    Poison Part:
    Sap/Juice