Plant DetailShow Menu

Sweet William Dianthus

Other plants called Sweet William:

Phonetic Spelling
dy-AN-thus
This plant has low severity poison characteristics.
See below
Description

The Dianthus genus includes over 27,000 registered cultivar names. They are grown as annuals, biennials and evergreen perennials.

Flowers are 5-parted, fragrant, pink-lilac, pink-purple or white, often with picotee margins. The common name of 'pinks' does not refer to the color, but to the fringed or frilly edging which looks like it was trimmed with 'pinking shears'.

Dianthus should be planted in full sun but can tolerate some shade. Well-drained soil and good air circulation are necessary to avoid root rot and fungal diseases.  Dianthus will grow in different soil types, preferring neutral to slightly alkaline soil, but can tolerate some acidity. 

The petals of the Dianthus flowers are edible when grown organically, and often crystallized with sugar and used for decorating cakes. However, the leaves can cause mild gastrointestinal distress if eaten and mild dermatitis if touched,

This plant is resistant to damage by deer but will be eaten by rabbits.

See this plant in the following landscapes:
Walkway at the Park Backyard Grouping Water Feature Flowers Galore Backyard Grouping Crevice Garden, Guilford County Walkway at the Park
Cultivars / Varieties:
  • ‘American Pie’TM Bumbleberry Pie’
  • ‘JoltTM Pink’
‘American Pie’TM Bumbleberry Pie’, ‘JoltTM Pink’
Tags:
#bees#purple#white#sun#showy flowers#poisonous#fragrant flowers#small spaces#annual#drought tolerant#perennial#pink flowers#edible flowers#cut flowers#cottage garden#cpp#well-drained soil#spreading#neutral ph#summer flowers#deer resistant#house plant#rock gardens#borders#spring interest#pollinator plant#edible garden#asian garden#urban conditions tolerant#dry soils tolerant#patio#container#butterfly friendly#fringed flowers#florist#HS302#problem for cats#problem for dogs#problem for horses
 
Cultivars / Varieties:
  • ‘American Pie’TM Bumbleberry Pie’
  • ‘JoltTM Pink’
‘American Pie’TM Bumbleberry Pie’, ‘JoltTM Pink’
Tags:
#bees#purple#white#sun#showy flowers#poisonous#fragrant flowers#small spaces#annual#drought tolerant#perennial#pink flowers#edible flowers#cut flowers#cottage garden#cpp#well-drained soil#spreading#neutral ph#summer flowers#deer resistant#house plant#rock gardens#borders#spring interest#pollinator plant#edible garden#asian garden#urban conditions tolerant#dry soils tolerant#patio#container#butterfly friendly#fringed flowers#florist#HS302#problem for cats#problem for dogs#problem for horses
  • Attributes:
    Genus:
    Dianthus
    Family:
    Caryophyllaceae
    Uses (Ethnobotany):
    Carnation petals have been used to make the French liqueur Chartreuse. Crystallized petals are used for decorating cakes, fresh petals can be used in salads. The bitter petal base is not edible. The leaves should not be eaten as they are mildly toxic.
    Life Cycle:
    Annual
    Biennial
    Perennial
    Recommended Propagation Strategy:
    Division
    Layering
    Seed
    Stem Cutting
    Country Or Region Of Origin:
    Eurasia, southern Africa
    Wildlife Value:
    Attracts butterflies and other insect pollinators.
    Edibility:
    Petals are edible (when free of pesticide and herbicide residues)
    Dimensions:
    Height: 0 ft. 4 in. - 3 ft. 0 in.
    Width: 1 ft. 0 in. - 2 ft. 0 in.
  • Whole Plant Traits:
    Plant Type:
    Edible
    Herbaceous Perennial
    Houseplant
    Perennial
    Poisonous
    Habit/Form:
    Cascading
    Clumping
    Erect
    Mounding
    Rounded
    Spreading
    Growth Rate:
    Slow
    Maintenance:
    Medium
    Texture:
    Medium
  • Cultural Conditions:
    Light:
    Full sun (6 or more hours of direct sunlight a day)
    Partial Shade (Direct sunlight only part of the day, 2-6 hours)
    Soil Texture:
    Clay
    Loam (Silt)
    Sand
    Soil pH:
    Neutral (6.0-8.0)
    Soil Drainage:
    Good Drainage
    Occasionally Dry
    Available Space To Plant:
    Less than 12 inches
    12 inches-3 feet
    NC Region:
    Coastal
    Mountains
    Piedmont
    USDA Plant Hardiness Zone:
    4a, 4b, 5b, 5a, 6b, 6a, 7b, 7a, 8a, 8b, 9b, 9a
  • Fruit:
    Fruit Type:
    Capsule
    Fruit Description:
    cylindric, or rarely ovoid, releasing seeds by 4 teeth or valves.
  • Flowers:
    Flower Color:
    Pink
    Purple/Lavender
    Red/Burgundy
    Variegated
    White
    Flower Inflorescence:
    Cyme
    Head
    Flower Value To Gardener:
    Edible
    Fragrant
    Good Cut
    Showy
    Flower Bloom Time:
    Spring
    Summer
    Flower Shape:
    Wheel
    Flower Petals:
    4-5 petals/rays
    Bracts
    Flower Size:
    1-3 inches
    Flower Description:
    The flower has five petals that are flattened and may be found as densely clustered flower heads, open cymes, and rarely as a solitary flower. They are usually self-sterile, requiring pollen from another plant for fertilization.
  • Leaves:
    Leaf Color:
    Gray/Silver
    Green
    Leaf Feel:
    Waxy
    Deciduous Leaf Fall Color:
    Insignificant
    Leaf Type:
    Simple
    Leaf Arrangement:
    Opposite
    Leaf Shape:
    Acicular
    Lanceolate
    Linear
    Oblanceolate
    Oblong
    Leaf Margin:
    Entire
    Hairs Present:
    No
    Leaf Length:
    1-3 inches
    Leaf Width:
    < 1 inch
    Leaf Description:
    Narrow leaves that are 2-3" long, often glaucous grey-green or blue-green, pinnate venation. Often found as parallel pairs on nodes at right angles to each other on the stem.
  • Stem:
    Stem Color:
    Gray/Silver
    Green
    Stem Is Aromatic:
    No
    Stem Description:
    terete or angular, articulated, dilated at nodes
  • Landscape:
    Landscape Location:
    Container
    Hanging Baskets
    Houseplants
    Patio
    Rock Wall
    Slope/Bank
    Small Space
    Walkways
    Landscape Theme:
    Asian Garden
    Cottage Garden
    Cutting Garden
    Drought Tolerant Garden
    Edible Garden
    Design Feature:
    Border
    Foundation Planting
    Mass Planting
    Small groups
    Attracts:
    Bees
    Butterflies
    Pollinators
    Resistance To Challenges:
    Deer
    Drought
    Dry Soil
    Pollution
    Urban Conditions
    Problems:
    Poisonous to Humans
    Problem for Cats
    Problem for Children
    Problem for Dogs
    Problem for Horses
  • Poisonous to Humans:
    Poison Severity:
    Low
    Poison Symptoms:
    Dermatitis, vomiting
    Poison Toxic Principle:
    Triterpenoid saponins
    Causes Contact Dermatitis:
    Yes
    Poison Part:
    Leaves