Plant DetailShow Menu

Sunny Woodmint Blephilia ciliata

Phonetic Spelling
bleh-FIL-ee-uh sil-ee-ATE-uh
Description

Ohio Horsemint is a short-lived, but fast growing, herbaceous perennial wildflower native to the central and eastern parts of the United States, although not commonly found in North Carolina. It is typically found growing wild in thin soils over limestone in dry open woods, prairies, savannas, limestone bluffs, glades, barrens, clearings, fields, steep slopes, disturbed sites and roadsides. The leaves of this wildflower in the mint family can be used in drinks and sauces and the fragrant blue-purple flowers are in  blossom from late spring to mid-summer. The genus name comes from the Greek blepharis meaning an eyelash, which refers to the bracts being fringed by hairs.

Plant it in the full sun to partial shade in well drained loamy or silty, moist to dry soil with a PH of 6 to 8. The soil can contain significant amounts of loam, clay, or gravel. The plant has some drought tolerance, but does not tolerate waterlogged soils or flooding, salt, or soil compaction. The plant forms clumps with limited spread and the roots are fibrous and shallow. The stems give off a mild fragrance when crushed.

Diseases, Insect Pests, and Other Plant Problems:

Susceptible to powdery mildew.

See this plant in the following landscape:
Cultivars / Varieties:
Tags:
#purple flowers#native perennials#blue flowers#NC native#perennial flowers#groundcover#wildflower garden#flowers late spring#flowers mid-summer#flowers early summer
 
Cultivars / Varieties:
Tags:
#purple flowers#native perennials#blue flowers#NC native#perennial flowers#groundcover#wildflower garden#flowers late spring#flowers mid-summer#flowers early summer
  • Attributes:
    Genus:
    Blephilia
    Species:
    ciliata
    Family:
    Lamiaceae
    Life Cycle:
    Perennial
    Recommended Propagation Strategy:
    Division
    Country Or Region Of Origin:
    Central and eastern North America.
    Distribution:
    Canada, south to Georgia and west to Oklahoma.
    Wildlife Value:
    The flowers attract long-tongued and short-tongued bees, bee flies, Syrphid flies, butterflies, and skippers.
    Edibility:
    Minty leaves can be eaten raw and used in teas. The leaves can be used to prepare sauces and drinks.
    Dimensions:
    Height: 1 ft. 0 in. - 2 ft. 6 in.
    Width: 0 ft. 8 in. - 1 ft. 6 in.
  • Whole Plant Traits:
    Plant Type:
    Herbaceous Perennial
    Native Plant
    Perennial
    Habit/Form:
    Clumping
    Erect
    Growth Rate:
    Rapid
    Maintenance:
    Medium
  • Cultural Conditions:
    Light:
    Full sun (6 or more hours of direct sunlight a day)
    Partial Shade (Direct sunlight only part of the day, 2-6 hours)
    Soil Texture:
    Clay
    Loam (Silt)
    Sand
    Soil pH:
    Acid (<6.0)
    Neutral (6.0-8.0)
    Soil Drainage:
    Good Drainage
    Moist
    Occasionally Dry
    Available Space To Plant:
    12 inches-3 feet
    NC Region:
    Mountains
    Piedmont
    USDA Plant Hardiness Zone:
    4a, 4b, 5b, 5a, 6a, 6b, 7a, 7b, 8b, 8a
  • Fruit:
    Fruit Description:
    The fruit is dry but does not split open when ripe.
  • Flowers:
    Flower Color:
    Blue
    Purple/Lavender
    White
    Flower Inflorescence:
    Spike
    Flower Value To Gardener:
    Fragrant
    Showy
    Flower Bloom Time:
    Spring
    Summer
    Flower Shape:
    Lipped
    Saucer
    Flower Petals:
    Bracts
    Colored Sepals
    Flower Size:
    < 1 inch
    Flower Description:
    The upper half of the central stem is perforated by whorled clusters of flowers. Each cluster of flowers is about 2 to 3 inches across with the flowers arranged in circular rows. The flowers are white, light pink, or lavender, and individually slightly less than ½ inch long. There are two prominent lips with small purple spots on the lower lip. The blooming period lasts about a month.
  • Leaves:
    Leaf Color:
    Green
    Leaf Type:
    Simple
    Leaf Arrangement:
    Opposite
    Leaf Shape:
    Lanceolate
    Oblong
    Leaf Margin:
    Entire
    Hairs Present:
    Yes
    Leaf Length:
    1-3 inches
    Leaf Width:
    1-3 inches
    Leaf Description:
    The leaves are up to 3½ inches long and 1½ inches across, broadly oblong to lanceolate in shape, and have smooth, slightly ciliate margins. The lower leaves have short stout petioles, while the upper leaves are sessile. They have deep pinnate venation and are covered with a white pubescence.
  • Stem:
    Stem Is Aromatic:
    No
    Stem Cross Section:
    Angular
    Stem Form:
    Straight
    Stem Surface:
    Hairy (pubescent)
    Stem Description:
    Unbranched. Side stems develop from upper leaf axils if the central stem is damaged. The stout central stem is 4-angled and covered with short white hairs.
  • Landscape:
    Landscape Location:
    Meadow
    Woodland
    Landscape Theme:
    Drought Tolerant Garden
    Pollinator Garden
    Design Feature:
    Mass Planting
    Attracts:
    Bees
    Pollinators
    Resistance To Challenges:
    Deer
    Drought
    Dry Soil