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Armoise Absinthe Artemisia absinthium

Phonetic Spelling
ar-tem-EE-zee-ah ab-SIN-thee-um
This plant has low severity poison characteristics.
See below
Description

Absinthe, the herb used to flavor the drink of the same name, is an herbaceous perennial native to Eurasia. It can be weedy in disturbed areas and has been naturalized in waste places in the northern United States. In the landscape, it is used as a cultivated ornamental with Its soft, gray foliage; it makes a good choice for toning down brighter colored flowers.  Consider planting it in borders, beds, or even rock gardens. It propagates by seed, though they germinate slowly.  

Plant in full to part sun and well-drained, loam to loamy clay, moist to moderately dry soil– some gravel or poor fertility is okay. Space these plants 5 feet apart and they will grow to an average height of 3 feet tall. As they may become leggy in part sun or too fertile soil, pinching back the tips in spring will help promote shorter, bushier growth. Deadhead flowers to prevent self-seeding.

While Absinthe was once banned in the US from use in food and drink, the reasoning being that the compounds within were high enough quantities to be toxic, the ban has been lifted as of 2007. 

Insects, Diseases, and Other Plant Problems:  Absinthe is a food source for a number of aphid, moth, and grasshopper species, but its aromatics generally deter herbivorous mammals including rabbits and deer.  Prone to root rot in wet soils. May struggle to thrive in NC's humid summers. This plant is a noxious weed in the Midwest.

More information on Artemisia.

See this plant in the following landscape:
Cultivars / Varieties:
Tags:
#poisonous#full sun tolerant#perennials#gray leaves#silver leaves#yellow flowers#medicinal#silver#summer flowers#deer browsing plant#ornamentals#herbaceous perennials#rhizomatous#late summer flowers#dry soils tolerant
 
Cultivars / Varieties:
Tags:
#poisonous#full sun tolerant#perennials#gray leaves#silver leaves#yellow flowers#medicinal#silver#summer flowers#deer browsing plant#ornamentals#herbaceous perennials#rhizomatous#late summer flowers#dry soils tolerant
  • Attributes:
    Genus:
    Artemisia
    Species:
    absinthium
    Family:
    Asteraceae
    Uses (Ethnobotany):
    It was used medicinally to flavor the drink absinthe, and in seasonings for food and drink. It has a very bitter taste.
    Life Cycle:
    Perennial
    Recommended Propagation Strategy:
    Division
    Seed
    Stem Cutting
    Country Or Region Of Origin:
    Europe to Siberia and W. Himalaya
    Particularly Resistant To (Insects/Diseases/Other Problems):
    Dry and poor soil, erosion, deer and rabbit damage
    Dimensions:
    Height: 2 ft. 0 in. - 5 ft. 0 in.
    Width: 2 ft. 0 in. - 5 ft. 0 in.
  • Whole Plant Traits:
    Plant Type:
    Herb
    Herbaceous Perennial
    Perennial
    Poisonous
    Habit/Form:
    Clumping
    Erect
    Multi-stemmed
    Maintenance:
    Medium
  • Cultural Conditions:
    Light:
    Full sun (6 or more hours of direct sunlight a day)
    Partial Shade (Direct sunlight only part of the day, 2-6 hours)
    Soil Texture:
    Clay
    Loam (Silt)
    Soil Drainage:
    Good Drainage
    Moist
    Occasionally Dry
    Available Space To Plant:
    3 feet-6 feet
    NC Region:
    Coastal
    Mountains
    Piedmont
    USDA Plant Hardiness Zone:
    3a, 3b, 4a, 4b, 5b, 5a, 6a, 6b, 7a, 7b, 8a, 8b, 9b, 9a
  • Fruit:
    Display/Harvest Time:
    Fall
    Summer
    Fruit Type:
    Achene
    Fruit Length:
    < 1 inch
    Fruit Width:
    < 1 inch
    Fruit Description:
    A type of achene called a cypsela, the fruits are very small and narrow. They are almost perfect cylinders, the top rounded and the bottom tapered.
  • Flowers:
    Flower Color:
    Gold/Yellow
    Green
    Flower Inflorescence:
    Head
    Panicle
    Flower Bloom Time:
    Fall
    Summer
    Flower Size:
    < 1 inch
    Flower Description:
    Flowers are small, drooping heads of greenish-yellow florets. While the whole panicle can range from 4-8 inches by 4-5 inches in size, each individual floret is only 1-2 mm. Florets on the margins of each head only have pistils while the central flowers have bost pistils and stamens. This plant's season is late summer to early fall and blooms for about 2-3 weeks.
  • Leaves:
    Leaf Color:
    Gray/Silver
    Green
    Leaf Feel:
    Soft
    Leaf Value To Gardener:
    Fragrant
    Showy
    Leaf Type:
    Simple
    Leaf Arrangement:
    Alternate
    Leaf Shape:
    Elliptical
    Ovate
    Pinnatifid
    Pinnatisect
    Leaf Margin:
    Lobed
    Hairs Present:
    Yes
    Leaf Length:
    1-3 inches
    Leaf Width:
    < 1 inch
    Leaf Description:
    Leaves are silvery-green, alternate, broadly ovate, and finely divided into blunt, narrow, pinnatifid segments. The length can reach between 1-3 inches with a width of roughly .5-1.5 inches and may differ in shape and size– basal leaves tend to be larger and more deeply lobed while upper leaves are smaller and more simple. The surfaces are covered with silvery hairs on both sides. Its soft, gray foliage makes it a good plant for toning down brighter colored flowers. The leaves of most species are strongly scented, almost sage-like; however, the scent can be unpleasant when crushed.
  • Stem:
    Stem Color:
    Gray/Silver
    Green
    Stem Is Aromatic:
    Yes
    Stem Cross Section:
    Round
    Stem Form:
    Straight
    Stem Surface:
    Hairy (pubescent)
    Stem Description:
    Grey-green stems that may be either smooth or covered in small, downy hairs. May develop some woodiness at the base and where the stems meet.
  • Landscape:
    Landscape Location:
    Naturalized Area
    Landscape Theme:
    Drought Tolerant Garden
    Edible Garden
    Design Feature:
    Border
    Resistance To Challenges:
    Deer
    Drought
    Dry Soil
    Erosion
    Poor Soil
    Rabbits
    Problems:
    Contact Dermatitis
    Poisonous to Humans
    Problem for Children
    Weedy
  • Poisonous to Humans:
    Poison Severity:
    Low
    Poison Symptoms:
    TOXIC ONLY IF LARGE QUANTITIES EATEN. Poisonous through ingestion. Overuse can lead to nervousness, stupor, convulsions, and potentially death. May cause contact dermatitis.
    Poison Toxic Principle:
    A monoterpene thujone, glycoside
    Causes Contact Dermatitis:
    Yes
    Poison Part:
    Bark
    Flowers
    Fruits
    Leaves
    Roots
    Seeds
    Stems