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Sulfur Tuft Naematoloma fasciculare

Previously known as:

  • Hypholoma fasciculare
Phonetic Spelling
nay-MAH-toh-LOH-muh fas-sik-yoo-LAIR-ee
This plant has high severity poison characteristics.
See below
Description

A mushroom found in forest or natural areas, often in dense clusters of 20-30 fruiting bodies.  They can be found on logs and stumps of various tree species or on soil, probably from buried wood.

Although not recommended, the bitter taste, habit and habitat makes this species rather easy to identify. There are several related species that lack the bitter taste and are edible. Care should be taken in identifying these related species.

Identification Checklist:

  • CAP: Yellow, orangeish yellow or greenish yellow, smooth, up to 3 inches in diameter.

  • GILLS: Attached to the stalk, greenish yellow becoming purplish yellow as spores mature.

  • STALK: Thin (up to 1/3 inch thick), yellow becoming brownish yellow.

  • ANNULUS: Thin and fibrous leaving only a fibrous zone on the stalk.

  • SPORE PRINT: Purple-brown.

  • TASTE: Very bitter.

See this plant in the following landscape:
Cultivars / Varieties:
Tags:
#poisonous#mushrooms
 
Cultivars / Varieties:
Tags:
#poisonous#mushrooms
  • Attributes:
    Genus:
    Naematoloma
    Species:
    fasciculare
    Family:
    Strophariaceae
    Country Or Region Of Origin:
    USA, NC
    Distribution:
    Throughout NC
  • Whole Plant Traits:
    Plant Type:
    Mushroom
    Poisonous
    Habit/Form:
    Erect
  • Leaves:
    Hairs Present:
    No
  • Stem:
    Stem Is Aromatic:
    No
  • Landscape:
    Landscape Location:
    Naturalized Area
    Woodland
    Problems:
    Poisonous to Humans
  • Poisonous to Humans:
    Poison Severity:
    High
    Poison Symptoms:
    HIGHLY TOXIC, MAY BE FATAL IF EATEN! Abdominal pain and diarrhea. Extent and seriousness of poisoning by this fungus is not clear. An European case reported six deaths attributed to the ingestion of this fungus.
    Poison Toxic Principle:
    Steroid depsipeptides fasciculol E and fasciculol F
    Causes Contact Dermatitis:
    No
    Poison Part:
    Fruits
    Leaves
    Stems