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Blue Iris Iris spuria

This plant has low severity poison characteristics.
See below
Description

Blue Iris (also commonly known as Salt Marsh Iris or Butterfly Iris) is a 5-foot tall, beardless, herbaceous perennial bulb native to Europe, Africa, and Asia. It is one of the tallest of the iris family. It typically grows in clumps with attractive 4 foot long leaves and flowers that display a range of colors from bluish-purple white, blue, purple, wine and brown. The genus is named for the Greek goddess of the rainbow and the epithet, Spuria, means false.

Blue Iris grows best in rich, well-composted, medium moisture, neutral to slightly alkaline, well-drained soils. For best flowering and disease resistance site the plant in full sun, although they will tolerate light shade. Provide consistent moisture during growth periods, but avoid wet soils. Many spurias are summer dormant and need less moisture after bloom (that is, plant growth often stops during hot weather and plants can survive with little watering). Amend heavy clay soils prior to planting (for example, add coarse sand or organic matter). Raised plantings are another solution. Avoid overhead watering. Deadhead individual spent flowers and remove flowering stems to the ground after bloom. Divide plants immediately after flowering when overcrowding occurs. Keep in mind that the most frequent causes of failure to flower or sparse flowering are rhizomes planted too deep, too much shade, too much fertilizer or plants that are overcrowded and need division.

Diseases, Insect Pests, and Other Plant Problems:

Good soil drainage is essential to combat potential soft rot problems. You should avoid the use of mulch for the same reason. Insect problems include iris borer, iris weevil, slugs, snails, thrips, whiteflies and verbena bud moth. Major disease problems include bacterial soft rot, crown rot fungus, rhizome rot, and fungal leaf spot. Watch for mottling of leaves and flowers which may indicate the presence of mosaic virus. Mustard seed fungus can be fatal. Good sanitation practices can often prevent problems.

See this plant in the following landscape:
Cultivars / Varieties:
Tags:
#bulb#showy flowers#blue flowers#tall#long bloom time#multicolored#butterfly friendly#problem for cats#problem for dogs#problem for horses
 
Cultivars / Varieties:
Tags:
#bulb#showy flowers#blue flowers#tall#long bloom time#multicolored#butterfly friendly#problem for cats#problem for dogs#problem for horses
  • Attributes:
    Genus:
    Iris
    Species:
    spuria
    Family:
    Iridaceae
    Life Cycle:
    Bulb
    Perennial
    Recommended Propagation Strategy:
    Division
    Country Or Region Of Origin:
    Europe, northern Africa, southwestern Asia
    Distribution:
    California
    Wildlife Value:
    Flowers attract butterflies
    Bulb Storage:
    Plant rhizomes about 2 inches deep and about 24 inches apart in mid to late summer and fertilize regularly in spring prior to bloom.
    Edibility:
    Can be mildly toxic if ingested.
    Dimensions:
    Height: 2 ft. 0 in. - 5 ft. 0 in.
    Width: 2 ft. 0 in. - 3 ft. 0 in.
  • Whole Plant Traits:
    Plant Type:
    Bulb
    Herbaceous Perennial
    Habit/Form:
    Clumping
    Creeping
    Erect
    Maintenance:
    Medium
  • Cultural Conditions:
    Light:
    Full sun (6 or more hours of direct sunlight a day)
    Partial Shade (Direct sunlight only part of the day, 2-6 hours)
    Soil Texture:
    High Organic Matter
    Soil pH:
    Alkaline (>8.0)
    Neutral (6.0-8.0)
    Soil Drainage:
    Good Drainage
    Available Space To Plant:
    12 inches-3 feet
    USDA Plant Hardiness Zone:
    5a, 5b, 6b, 6a, 7a, 7b, 8a, 8b, 9b, 9a
  • Fruit:
    Fruit Color:
    Brown/Copper
    Display/Harvest Time:
    Fall
    Fruit Type:
    Capsule
    Fruit Description:
    After the iris has flowered, it produces an oblong-ovate, hexagonal, seed capsule with a long beak-like appendage on the top and 6 visible, longitudinal groves. Inside the capsule, are light brown, angular seeds.
  • Flowers:
    Flower Color:
    Blue
    Purple/Lavender
    Red/Burgundy
    White
    Flower Value To Gardener:
    Long Bloom Season
    Showy
    Flower Bloom Time:
    Spring
    Summer
    Flower Shape:
    Lipped
    Flower Petals:
    2-3 rays/petals
    Flower Size:
    3-6 inches
    Flower Description:
    Two to five inch flowers typically have bluish-purple segments with falls sometimes having a yellow ridge. Color variations include white, blue, purple, wine and brown. Blossoms May to July.
  • Leaves:
    Leaf Color:
    Blue
    Green
    Leaf Value To Gardener:
    Showy
    Leaf Type:
    Sheath
    Leaf Shape:
    Lanceolate
    Linear
    Leaf Margin:
    Entire
    Hairs Present:
    No
    Leaf Length:
    > 6 inches
    Leaf Width:
    1-3 inches
    Leaf Description:
    Slender, elongated, narrow linear leaves to 3 to 4 feet long. After the plant has flowered and set seed, the leaves die in the late summer.
  • Stem:
    Stem Is Aromatic:
    No
    Stem Cross Section:
    Round
    Stem Description:
    Stems typically rise to 3 feet (occasionally to 5 feet) tall. Stalk height is often reduced in cold winter climates.
  • Landscape:
    Landscape Location:
    Small Space
    Landscape Theme:
    Butterfly Garden
    Cutting Garden
    Design Feature:
    Border
    Mass Planting
    Attracts:
    Butterflies
    Problems:
    Problem for Cats
    Problem for Dogs
    Problem for Horses
  • Poisonous to Humans:
    Poison Severity:
    Low
    Poison Symptoms:
    Salivation, vomiting, drooling, lethargy, diarrhea. Highest concentration in rhizomes. Can cause skin irritation.
    Poison Toxic Principle:
    Pentacylic terpenoids (zeorin, missourin and missouriensin)
    Causes Contact Dermatitis:
    Yes
    Poison Part:
    Leaves
    Roots
    Sap/Juice