Plant DetailShow Menu

Plants that fill a similar niche:
Acer rubrum Acer rubrum
Acer saccharinum From
Ulmus rubra Tree form (Guilford County, NC)-Mid Summer
Fraxinus quadrangulata has some common insect problems:
Emerald Ash Borer

Fraxinus quadrangulata

Common Name(s):

Description

Blue ash is a deciduous tree native to the midwestern U.S.A. in the Oleaceae (olive) family. This tree will grow 50-60 feet tall with an oval to pyramidal form. It has the typical compound leaves of other ash trees but the new stems are 4 sided making it easy to identify. The name quadrangulata actually means four-sided. The common name of blue ash comes from a dye that was extracted from the bark and used to color yarn by the early settlers. This tree has also suffered from the emerald ash borer but seems to be the least affected in comparison to other North American ash trees.

Blue ash is found growing in both damp and dry conditions and tolerates growing on limestone substrates better than other ash trees. It prefers full sun and is not picky about pH or soil types. Unlike some ash trees, blue ash dislikes flooded conditions and tolerates alkaline soils better.

Insects, Diseases, and Other Plant Problems: Emerald ash borer. It can be more difficult to propagate and slower to establish than other ash trees.

VIDEO created by Grant L. Thompson for “Trees, Shrubs, and Woody Vines for Landscaping” a plant identification course offered by the Department of Horticulture at Iowa State University.

 

Profile Video:
See this plant in the following landscape:
Cultivars / Varieties:
Tags:
#shade tree#drought tolerant#alkaline soils tolerant#deciduous tree#partial sun tolerant#sun#pests#landscape plant sleuths course
 
Cultivars / Varieties:
Tags:
#shade tree#drought tolerant#alkaline soils tolerant#deciduous tree#partial sun tolerant#sun#pests#landscape plant sleuths course
  • Attributes:
    Genus:
    Fraxinus
    Species:
    quadrangulata
    Family:
    Oleaceae
    Life Cycle:
    Woody
    Country Or Region Of Origin:
    North and East central U.S.A.
    Distribution:
    AL , AR , GA , IA , IL , IN , KS , KY , MI , MN , MO , MS , OH , OK , TN , VA , WI , WV
    Wildlife Value:
    Birds and mammals will eat the seeds. Tadpoles feed on the fallen leaves. Many moths and butterfly larvae will eat the leaves.
    Play Value:
    Wildlife Cover/Habitat
    Wildlife Food Source
    Wildlife Larval Host
    Dimensions:
    Height: 50 ft. 0 in. - 70 ft. 0 in.
    Width: 50 ft. 0 in. - 70 ft. 0 in.
  • Whole Plant Traits:
    Plant Type:
    Tree
    Woody Plant Leaf Characteristics:
    Deciduous
    Habit/Form:
    Erect
    Oval
    Pyramidal
    Growth Rate:
    Medium
    Maintenance:
    Low
    Texture:
    Medium
  • Cultural Conditions:
    Light:
    Full sun (6 or more hours of direct sunlight a day)
    Soil Texture:
    Clay
    Loam (Silt)
    Sand
    Soil pH:
    Acid (<6.0)
    Alkaline (>8.0)
    Neutral (6.0-8.0)
    Soil Drainage:
    Good Drainage
    Moist
    Occasionally Dry
    Available Space To Plant:
    more than 60 feet
    USDA Plant Hardiness Zone:
    4b, 4a, 5b, 5a, 6b, 6a, 7b, 7a
  • Fruit:
    Fruit Color:
    Brown/Copper
    Display/Harvest Time:
    Fall
    Fruit Type:
    Samara
    Fruit Length:
    1-3 inches
    Fruit Width:
    < 1 inch
    Fruit Description:
    Winged samaras in clusters. Individuals are 1–1½" long, ¼–½" across
  • Flowers:
    Flower Color:
    Purple/Lavender
    Flower Inflorescence:
    Insignificant
    Flower Bloom Time:
    Spring
    Flower Description:
    A panicle of very small insignificant flowers in spring
  • Leaves:
    Woody Plant Leaf Characteristics:
    Deciduous
    Leaf Color:
    Gold/Yellow
    Leaf Feel:
    Smooth
    Deciduous Leaf Fall Color:
    Gold/Yellow
    Leaf Type:
    Compound (Pinnately , Bipinnately, Palmately)
    Leaf Arrangement:
    Opposite
    Leaf Shape:
    Lanceolate
    Ovate
    Leaf Margin:
    Serrate
    Hairs Present:
    Yes
    Leaf Length:
    3-6 inches
    Leaf Width:
    1-3 inches
    Leaf Description:
    The green opposite compound leaves have 5-11 leaflets, most often 7-9, that may have a few hairs on the underside. Each leaflet is 2-5 by 1-2 inches. They have short stems and are oval to lanceolate in shape. The margins are serrated. Fall color is a pale yellow.
  • Bark:
    Bark Color:
    Light Brown
    Light Gray
    Surface/Attachment:
    Furrowed
    Ridges
    Bark Plate Shape:
    Irregular
    Bark Description:
    Gray to gray-brown bark with furrows and short irregular ridges
  • Stem:
    Stem Color:
    Brown/Copper
    Gray/Silver
    Stem Is Aromatic:
    No
    Stem Cross Section:
    Square
    Stem Surface:
    Hairy (pubescent)
    Stem Description:
    4-sided twigs are corky and buds are gray to brown. May be slightly pubescent
  • Landscape:
    Landscape Location:
    Lawn
    Naturalized Area
    Riparian
    Design Feature:
    Shade Tree
    Attracts:
    Butterflies
    Frogs
    Moths
    Small Mammals
    Songbirds
    Resistance To Challenges:
    Drought
    Problems:
    Frequent Insect Problems