Plant DetailShow Menu

Echeveria

Phonetic Spelling
ech-eh-ver-EE-a
Description

Echeveria is a genus of plants in the succulent family Crassulaceae.  It is native to desert regions of Texas into South America and is therefore quite drought tolerant.  Their coarse texture make these plants excellent accents in rock or crevice gardens.  They're also a popular house plant due to their small size at maturity, usually smaller than a foot.

These plants grow best in bright light and well-drained soil with a little organic matter.  Too much direct sunlight can burn the leaves, but too little light can cause color loss.  Water about once a week, never letting the soil fully dry out. They are very beginner-friendly houseplants and are easy to care for. 

Quick ID:

  • Thick, fleshy, upright leaves in a mounding habit
  • Entire margins with a point at the tip

 

VIDEO Created by Laura Barth for "Houseplants, Succulents, and Cacti", a plant identification course offered in partnership with Longwood Gardens.

 

Profile Video:
See this plant in the following landscape:
Cultivars / Varieties:
'Blue Metal', E. derenbergii, E. elegans, E. multicaulis, E. runyonii 'Topsy Turvy', E. secunda, E. x gliva, 'Pulv-oliver'
Tags:
#small spaces#houseplant#drought tolerant#perennials#easy to grow#pet friendly#herbaceous perennials#easy to propagate#rock gardens#non-toxic for horses#non-toxic for dogs#non-toxic for cats#crevice garden#container plants#easy to grow houseplant#hsc#hsc-s
 
Cultivars / Varieties:
'Blue Metal', E. derenbergii, E. elegans, E. multicaulis, E. runyonii 'Topsy Turvy', E. secunda, E. x gliva, 'Pulv-oliver'
Tags:
#small spaces#houseplant#drought tolerant#perennials#easy to grow#pet friendly#herbaceous perennials#easy to propagate#rock gardens#non-toxic for horses#non-toxic for dogs#non-toxic for cats#crevice garden#container plants#easy to grow houseplant#hsc#hsc-s
  • Attributes:
    Genus:
    Echeveria
    Family:
    Crassulaceae
    Life Cycle:
    Perennial
    Recommended Propagation Strategy:
    Division
    Leaf Cutting
    Country Or Region Of Origin:
    Texas to Argentina
  • Whole Plant Traits:
    Plant Type:
    Herbaceous Perennial
    Houseplant
    Perennial
    Succulent
    Habit/Form:
    Clumping
    Mounding
    Maintenance:
    Low
    Texture:
    Coarse
  • Cultural Conditions:
    Light:
    Full sun (6 or more hours of direct sunlight a day)
    Partial Shade (Direct sunlight only part of the day, 2-6 hours)
    Soil Texture:
    Loam (Silt)
    Sand
    Soil Drainage:
    Good Drainage
    Available Space To Plant:
    Less than 12 inches
  • Flowers:
    Flower Color:
    Gold/Yellow
    Orange
    Pink
    Flower Inflorescence:
    Cyme
    Raceme
    Flower Value To Gardener:
    Showy
    Flower Shape:
    Tubular
    Flower Petals:
    4-5 petals/rays
    Flower Size:
    < 1 inch
    Flower Description:
    An inflorescence of 5-7 tubular flowers in a combination of pink, orange, or yellow. Blooms multiple times in the plant's lifetime.
  • Leaves:
    Leaf Color:
    Blue
    Gray/Silver
    Green
    Pink
    Purple/Lavender
    Red/Burgundy
    Variegated
    White
    Leaf Feel:
    Fleshy
    Glossy
    Smooth
    Waxy
    Leaf Value To Gardener:
    Long-lasting
    Showy
    Leaf Type:
    Simple
    Leaf Arrangement:
    Rosulate
    Leaf Shape:
    Linear
    Oblanceolate
    Ovate
    Spatulate
    Leaf Margin:
    Entire
    Hairs Present:
    No
    Leaf Description:
    Thick, fleshy leaves that vary in shape and color among species, hybrids, and cultivars. They have a point at the tip, but can be distinguished from Aonium by the entire margins and more upright habit. Most are smooth and hairless and some have a glaucous bloom on the surface.
  • Stem:
    Stem Color:
    Green
    Stem Is Aromatic:
    No
    Stem Surface:
    Covered with a powdery bloom (glaucous)
    Stem Description:
    Short, succulent stems.
  • Landscape:
    Landscape Location:
    Rock Wall
    Small Space
    Landscape Theme:
    Drought Tolerant Garden
    Rock Garden
    Design Feature:
    Accent
    Resistance To Challenges:
    Drought