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Lily-Of-The-Valley Convallaria pseudomajalis

Other Common Name(s):

Other plants called Lily-Of-The-Valley:

Previously known as:

  • Convallaria majalis subsp. majuscula
  • Convallaria majalis var. majuscula
  • Convallaria majuscula
  • Convallaria montana
Phonetic Spelling
kon-vuh-LAIR-ee-uh soo-doh-maj-AH-liss
This plant has high severity poison characteristics.
See below
Description

Lily of the Valley is a wildflower native to the Southern Appalachians and is found in the mountains and Piedmont of NC. Its native habitat is mountain forests, particularly in rocky or sandy dry woodlands or forests, usually under oaks in elevations from 700 to 1500 meters. It grows and spreads by underground rhizomes and can form small colonies. The fragrant bell-shaped flowers appear in spring on short stalks April-June.

Lily of the Valley needs well-drained soils enriched with compost, partial to dappled shade and will do well under trees or in a woodland area. It is drought tolerant once established.

 

See this plant in the following landscape:
Cultivars / Varieties:
Tags:
#white#poisonous#partial shade#white flowers#perennial bulb#shade garden#mass planting#NC native#deer browsing plant#bell shape#small plant#spring interest#walkways#bee friendly#woodlands
 
Cultivars / Varieties:
Tags:
#white#poisonous#partial shade#white flowers#perennial bulb#shade garden#mass planting#NC native#deer browsing plant#bell shape#small plant#spring interest#walkways#bee friendly#woodlands
  • Attributes:
    Genus:
    Convallaria
    Species:
    pseudomajalis
    Family:
    Asparagaceae
    Life Cycle:
    Perennial
    Recommended Propagation Strategy:
    Division
    Country Or Region Of Origin:
    Southern Appalachia of USA
    Distribution:
    WV, VA, KY, TN, NC, SC, and GA.
    Wildlife Value:
    Bees are attracted to the flowers. Deer will browse the plant and wild hogs will dig the rhizomes.
    Bulb Storage:
    Not necessary
  • Whole Plant Traits:
    Plant Type:
    Herbaceous Perennial
    Native Plant
    Poisonous
    Wildflower
    Habit/Form:
    Erect
    Maintenance:
    Medium
  • Cultural Conditions:
    Light:
    Dappled Sunlight (Shade through upper canopy all day)
    Partial Shade (Direct sunlight only part of the day, 2-6 hours)
    Soil Texture:
    High Organic Matter
    Soil pH:
    Acid (<6.0)
    Soil Drainage:
    Good Drainage
    Moist
    Occasionally Dry
    NC Region:
    Mountains
    Piedmont
    USDA Plant Hardiness Zone:
    5b, 5a, 6b, 6a, 7b, 7a, 8b, 8a
  • Fruit:
    Fruit Color:
    Red/Burgundy
    Display/Harvest Time:
    Fall
    Fruit Length:
    < 1 inch
    Fruit Width:
    < 1 inch
    Fruit Description:
    The fruit is a round red berry but seldom formed
  • Flowers:
    Flower Color:
    White
    Flower Inflorescence:
    Raceme
    Flower Value To Gardener:
    Fragrant
    Showy
    Flower Bloom Time:
    Spring
    Flower Shape:
    Bell
    Flower Size:
    < 1 inch
    Flower Description:
    6-10 small white bell-shaped flowers that dangle below the stem. The flowers are about 1/3" across and long. Blooms April-June.
  • Leaves:
    Leaf Color:
    Green
    Leaf Type:
    Simple
    Leaf Arrangement:
    Opposite
    Leaf Shape:
    Elliptical
    Oblanceolate
    Leaf Margin:
    Entire
    Hairs Present:
    No
    Leaf Length:
    > 6 inches
    Leaf Width:
    3-6 inches
    Leaf Description:
    2, sometimes 3 basal leaves are widely elliptic to oblanceolate, 9" long and 3-4" wide. The tip is pointed and leaf base tapers and wraps around the leaf stalk.
  • Stem:
    Stem Is Aromatic:
    No
  • Landscape:
    Landscape Location:
    Small Space
    Walkways
    Woodland
    Landscape Theme:
    Fairy Garden
    Native Garden
    Shade Garden
    Design Feature:
    Mass Planting
    Attracts:
    Bees
    Resistance To Challenges:
    Drought
    Problems:
    Poisonous to Humans
  • Poisonous to Humans:
    Poison Severity:
    High
    Poison Symptoms:
    Irregular and slow pulse, abdominal pain and diarrhea if eaten in large quantities.
    Poison Toxic Principle:
    Cardiac glycosides and saponins
    Causes Contact Dermatitis:
    No
    Poison Part:
    Bark
    Flowers
    Fruits
    Leaves
    Roots
    Sap/Juice
    Seeds
    Stems