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Carex texensis

Common Name(s):

Description

Texas sedge is a native cool-season sedge in the Cyperaceae family that is found throughout the sandy woodlands and savannas in the southeastern and midwestern United States.  It is a clump-forming perennial with medium green leaves that grow to a maximum height of 12 inches.  

Plant it in full sun to partial shade in dry to moist soils.  While it prefers sand, it will grow in a wide variety of soil types. If it is planted in the full sun in the southeast, make sure they have moist soils. This slow grower has long fine-textured foliage and colonizers through rhizomes.  Drought tolerance comes once established and it is very heat tolerant.  In late winter and early spring, it will go dormant and turn a straw color. In general, the more moisture it is given, the taller it will grow.

Use it as an underplanting under large trees and shrubs where traditional turfs do not work.  It tolerates light foot traffic and makes an excellent shade tolerant lawn alternative and even works in the elusive dry shade. If it will be planted in a high traffic area add stepping stones.  To maintain it as a turfgrass mow it on a high setting a few times a year.  Mass plantings of this sedge look natural in a meadow. Texas Sedge is a good turf substitute for dry to moist shade, colonizing densely by rhizomes. Its fine-textured foliage mixes nicely with other small, shade-loving plants. It can be mowed at a high setting. This plant is resistant to browsing by deer.

Diseases, Insect Pests, and Other Plant Problems:

No known diseases or insect pests.

See this plant in the following landscape:
Cultivars / Varieties:
Tags:
#drought tolerant#perennials#lawn alternative#NC native#deer resistant#herbaceous perennials#naturalized area#understory planting#native sedge#dry soils tolerant#foot traffic tolerant#dry shade#lawn alternative shade
 
Cultivars / Varieties:
Tags:
#drought tolerant#perennials#lawn alternative#NC native#deer resistant#herbaceous perennials#naturalized area#understory planting#native sedge#dry soils tolerant#foot traffic tolerant#dry shade#lawn alternative shade
  • Attributes:
    Genus:
    Carex
    Species:
    texensis
    Family:
    Cyperaceae
    Life Cycle:
    Perennial
    Recommended Propagation Strategy:
    Division
    Seed
    Country Or Region Of Origin:
    Southeastern and southern plains of United States.
    Distribution:
    Pennsylvania south to Georgia, west to Texas and Nebraska, and California.
  • Whole Plant Traits:
    Plant Type:
    Herbaceous Perennial
    Native Plant
    Ornamental Grasses and Sedges
    Perennial
    Habit/Form:
    Clumping
    Growth Rate:
    Medium
    Maintenance:
    Medium
    Texture:
    Fine
  • Cultural Conditions:
    Light:
    Full sun (6 or more hours of direct sunlight a day)
    Partial Shade (Direct sunlight only part of the day, 2-6 hours)
    Soil Texture:
    Clay
    High Organic Matter
    Loam (Silt)
    Sand
    Shallow Rocky
    Soil Drainage:
    Good Drainage
    Moist
    Occasionally Dry
    Available Space To Plant:
    Less than 12 inches
    NC Region:
    Coastal
    Mountains
    Piedmont
    USDA Plant Hardiness Zone:
    5a, 5b, 6b, 6a, 7a, 7b, 8a, 8b, 9b, 9a
  • Fruit:
    Fruit Type:
    Achene
    Nut
  • Flowers:
    Flower Color:
    Brown/Copper
    Green
    Flower Inflorescence:
    Spike
    Flower Bloom Time:
    Spring
    Flower Size:
    < 1 inch
    Flower Description:
    Spiklets of green flowers appear March-May eventually turning brown.
  • Leaves:
    Leaf Color:
    Green
    Leaf Feel:
    Smooth
    Leaf Type:
    Simple
    Leaf Arrangement:
    Alternate
    Leaf Shape:
    Linear
    Hairs Present:
    No
    Leaf Description:
    Parallel veined simple alternate leaves.
  • Stem:
    Stem Is Aromatic:
    No
  • Landscape:
    Landscape Location:
    Meadow
    Naturalized Area
    Slope/Bank
    Landscape Theme:
    Drought Tolerant Garden
    Native Garden
    Design Feature:
    Mass Planting
    Resistance To Challenges:
    Deer
    Drought
    Dry Soil
    Heat