Plant DetailShow Menu

Hybrid Tuberous Begonia Begonia (Tuberosa Group)

Other Common Name(s):

Phonetic Spelling
beh-GON-yuh
This plant has low severity poison characteristics.
See below
Description

Begoniaceae is a large flowering plant family with about 1500 different species and hundreds of hybrids. Mature begonia plants range in size from a few inches high to over 12 feet high and the flowers, foliage colors and sizes are very diverse. The American Begonia Society has created a number of non-scientific categories for classifying Begonias including tuberosa. Begonia (Tuberosa Group) hybrids have shown some cold hardiness including the tuberous Begonia grandis (USDA zones 6-10). The typical form has large round leaves with a pale green reverse, or with red veins, and pale pink or white flowers and come up in spring from a dormant tuber to flower in late summer. As winter approaches, small tubers or bulbils develop at each leaf axis; these drop and will sprout the following year, in time resulting in a lovely patch of begonias.

Begonia (Tuberosa group) is a hybrid tuberous begonia encompassing 13 different types of summer flowering tender plants with colorful waxy petals.  Flower shapes vary from camellia-like or carnation and differ in the number of petals (single, double), petal type (banded, ruffled)  or habit (compact, weeping, cascading).  Some hybrids may need staking.  Tuberous Begonias prefer dappled sunlight or bright shade in organically rich well-drained moist, but not soggy soil, full sun, or full shade.  While tricky to grow, they make excellent interior or exterior container plants, mass planted in border fronts or in window boxes.  Plant tubers shallowly n groups of 3-4 per container or space 12"-18" apart in the ground.  Outdoor containers can be brought inside to overwinter.  Plants do not like humidity or heat so can sometimes suffer in southern summers.  Protect from too much sun and wind with mulch and protected siting, but make sure to provide good air circulation to avoid foliar diseases.  Begonias propagate very easily from stem or leaf cuttings.

Regular fertilization during the growing period produces the most profuse bloom. Start plants indoors in late winter about 2 1/2 to 3 months before all threat of frost is over. Plant tubers shallowly with concave side up. Taper off watering in fall when leaves begin to turn yellow. Before first fall frost, store containers in frost free location or dig up tubers and store. Store until time to replant in late winter in preparation for the next growing season.

Insects, Diseases, and Other Plant Problems: 

Aphids, mealybugs, whiteflies, slugs and snails are occasional problems.  Powdery mildew and stem rot can occasionally occur.  Too much water can cause tuber rot and not enough air circulation can cause disease problems. 

See this plant in the following landscape:
Cultivars / Varieties:
Tags:
#partial shade#houseplant#annual#orange#rose#salmon#apricot#container plant#pink flowers#orange flowers#salmon flowers#interiorscape#tuberous#black walnut#window boxes#cpp#bedding plant#summer flowers#scarlet flowers#apricot flowers#scarlet#borders#mid-summer flowers#border front#late summer flowers#patio planting#dry soils tolerant#problem for cats#problem for dogs#problem for horses
 
Cultivars / Varieties:
Tags:
#partial shade#houseplant#annual#orange#rose#salmon#apricot#container plant#pink flowers#orange flowers#salmon flowers#interiorscape#tuberous#black walnut#window boxes#cpp#bedding plant#summer flowers#scarlet flowers#apricot flowers#scarlet#borders#mid-summer flowers#border front#late summer flowers#patio planting#dry soils tolerant#problem for cats#problem for dogs#problem for horses
  • Attributes:
    Genus:
    Begonia
    Family:
    Begoniaceae
    Life Cycle:
    Annual
    Bulb
    Perennial
    Recommended Propagation Strategy:
    Leaf Cutting
    Stem Cutting
    Country Or Region Of Origin:
    Southern China, Japan
    Bulb Storage:
    Before hard frost, dig up tubers and remove excess soil. Dry and cover with dry medium like peat, wood shavings, or pearlite. Store in cool dry location and replant tubers in late winter.
    Dimensions:
    Height: 1 ft. 0 in. - 1 ft. 6 in.
    Width: 1 ft. 0 in. - 2 ft. 0 in.
  • Whole Plant Traits:
    Plant Type:
    Annual
    Bulb
    Herbaceous Perennial
    Habit/Form:
    Cascading
    Dense
    Weeping
    Growth Rate:
    Medium
    Maintenance:
    High
  • Cultural Conditions:
    Light:
    Dappled Sunlight (Shade through upper canopy all day)
    Partial Shade (Direct sunlight only part of the day, 2-6 hours)
    Soil Texture:
    High Organic Matter
    Soil Drainage:
    Good Drainage
    Moist
    Available Space To Plant:
    12 inches-3 feet
    USDA Plant Hardiness Zone:
    9a, 9b, 10a, 10b, 11a, 11b
  • Fruit:
    Fruit Type:
    Capsule
    Fruit Description:
    Dry winged capsule which splits lengthwise to reveal numerous tiny seeds.
  • Flowers:
    Flower Color:
    Gold/Yellow
    Orange
    Pink
    Red/Burgundy
    White
    Flower Inflorescence:
    Cyme
    Flower Value To Gardener:
    Showy
    Flower Bloom Time:
    Fall
    Summer
    Flower Size:
    3-6 inches
    Flower Description:
    Mid summer to early fall flowers are waxy feeling white scarlet, pink, salmon, orange, rose, or apricot. This plant has up to 6-in. flowers in threes. Male flowers are double.
  • Leaves:
    Leaf Color:
    Green
    Variegated
    Leaf Feel:
    Waxy
    Leaf Value To Gardener:
    Showy
    Leaf Type:
    Simple
    Leaf Arrangement:
    Alternate
    Leaf Shape:
    Ovate
    Leaf Margin:
    Serrate
    Hairs Present:
    No
    Leaf Length:
    > 6 inches
    Leaf Description:
    It has pointed oval to ear-shaped asymmetrical, green leaves which may be streaked or spotted, up to 8" long.
  • Stem:
    Stem Is Aromatic:
    No
  • Landscape:
    Landscape Location:
    Container
    Hanging Baskets
    Houseplants
    Patio
    Design Feature:
    Border
    Mass Planting
    Resistance To Challenges:
    Black Walnut
    Dry Soil
    Problems:
    Problem for Cats
    Problem for Dogs
    Problem for Horses
  • Poisonous to Humans:
    Poison Severity:
    Low
    Poison Symptoms:
    Kidney failure (in grazing animals), vomiting, salivation in dogs/cats. The most toxic part is underground.
    Poison Toxic Principle:
    Soluble calcium oxalates
    Causes Contact Dermatitis:
    No