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Asparagus officinalis

Common Name(s):

Phonetic Spelling
ah-SPAIR-ah-gus oh-fiss-ih-NAH-liss
This plant has low severity poison characteristics.
See below
Description

Erect, perennial herb, thick, succulent, and unbranched when young; leaves alternate, scale-like and often spiny, terminal branchlets very narrow and needle-like, clustered; flowers axillary, drooping, 6-parted, bell-shaped, yellow-green; fruit a bright red berry.

Cultivars / Varieties:
Tags:
 
Cultivars / Varieties:
Tags:
  • Attributes:
    Genus:
    Asparagus
    Species:
    officinalis
    Family:
    Asparagaceae
    Country Or Region Of Origin:
    Europe, Asia, North Africa
    Edibility:
    Edible parts: young spears (shoots). Harvest time: collect asparagus spears in the early spring, while very young. Only collect spears from areas you know have NOT been treated with pesticides. Safe handling procedures: wash spears thoroughly with warm water to remove dirt and debris. Do not use dish detergent or any type of sanitizer. These products can leave a residue. Peel off the outer skin to within an inch of the top of the spear. Tie spears into bundles (about eight to a bundle) and place lengthwise into boiling salted water. Boil for about 10 minutes until tender, but not soggy. Serve hot with melted butter, or cold with oil and vinegar and seasonings.
  • Whole Plant Traits:
    Plant Type:
    Poisonous
  • Leaves:
    Hairs Present:
    No
  • Stem:
    Stem Is Aromatic:
    No
  • Landscape:
    Problems:
    Contact Dermatitis
  • Poisonous to Humans:
    Poison Severity:
    Low
    Poison Symptoms:
    CAUSES ONLY LOW TOXICITY IF EATEN. SKIN IRRITATION MINOR OR LASTING ONLY FOR A FEW MINUTES. Contact dermatitis from young, raw shoots; eating of berries may cause gastrointestinal problems
    Poison Toxic Principle:
    Unknown
    Causes Contact Dermatitis:
    Yes
    Poison Part:
    Fruits
    Stems