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Lords and Ladies Arum

Other Common Name(s):

This plant has high severity poison characteristics.
See below
Description

This genus is a group of around 32 herbaceous tubular flowering plants that are native to Europe, Africa and Asia. They can vary in size from 1-2 feet tall. The genus name comes from the Greek word ‘aron’, meaning ‘climbing’ or ‘poisonous plant’

Flowers consist of a spathe that surrounds the spadix and is followed by clusters of round berries in reds and oranges. Many are used as ground cover in shady areas. In some of the Pacific west of the USA, some varieties have escaped gardens and become invasive. The leaves of several species are variegated and showy. They will wait to appear in the fall and grow during the winter in warmer winter areas. Flowers will appear in spring before the plant goes dormant.

Arum lilies prefer well-drained moist soil in part sun to part shade but tolerate a wide range of soils. They are easy to grow and deer-resistant. Grow as a ground cover for a winter garden along a woodland area.

Additional Arum images at Juniper Level Botanical Gardens

Insects, Diseases, and Other Plant Problems: No significant problems.

 

 

See this plant in the following landscape:
Cultivars / Varieties:
Tags:
#showy leaves#spadix#variegated#groundcover#winter garden#problem for cats#problem for dogs#problem for children#problem for horses#problem for cattle#weedy
 
Cultivars / Varieties:
Tags:
#showy leaves#spadix#variegated#groundcover#winter garden#problem for cats#problem for dogs#problem for children#problem for horses#problem for cattle#weedy
  • Attributes:
    Genus:
    Arum
    Family:
    Araceae
    Life Cycle:
    Bulb
    Country Or Region Of Origin:
    Asia, Europe, Africa
  • Whole Plant Traits:
    Plant Type:
    Bulb
    Growth Rate:
    Medium
    Maintenance:
    Medium
    Texture:
    Medium
  • Cultural Conditions:
    Light:
    Dappled Sunlight (Shade through upper canopy all day)
    Deep shade (Less than 2 hours to no direct sunlight)
    Partial Shade (Direct sunlight only part of the day, 2-6 hours)
    Soil Texture:
    Clay
    Loam (Silt)
    Sand
    Soil Drainage:
    Good Drainage
    Moist
    Occasionally Dry
    NC Region:
    Coastal
    Mountains
    Piedmont
    USDA Plant Hardiness Zone:
    5a, 5b, 6a, 6b, 7a, 7b, 8a, 8b, 9a, 9b
  • Fruit:
    Fruit Color:
    Red/Burgundy
    Display/Harvest Time:
    Spring
    Fruit Type:
    Berry
    Fruit Length:
    < 1 inch
    Fruit Width:
    < 1 inch
    Fruit Description:
    Clusters of berries form from pollinated flowers
  • Flowers:
    Flower Inflorescence:
    Spadix
    Flower Bloom Time:
    Spring
    Flower Description:
    An arrow-shaped spathe surrounds the spadix. Flowers vary in size and color
  • Leaves:
    Leaf Color:
    Green
    Variegated
    Leaf Type:
    Simple
    Leaf Shape:
    Ovate
    Leaf Margin:
    Entire
    Hairs Present:
    No
    Leaf Length:
    > 6 inches
    Leaf Width:
    3-6 inches
    Leaf Description:
    Leaves are green to variegated, arrow-shaped and 4-12 inches long
  • Stem:
    Stem Is Aromatic:
    No
  • Landscape:
    Landscape Location:
    Woodland
    Landscape Theme:
    Winter Garden
    Design Feature:
    Small groups
    Problems:
    Contact Dermatitis
    Problem for Cats
    Problem for Children
    Problem for Dogs
    Problem for Horses
    Weedy
  • Poisonous to Humans:
    Poison Severity:
    High
    Poison Symptoms:
    All parts of the plant are poisonous. The sap can cause dermatitis. Ingestion can cause irritation, burning and swelling of the mouth and throat, breathing difficulties, severe nausea, vomiting and stomach pain, diarrhea shock and exhaustion, death.
    Poison Toxic Principle:
    calcium oxalate crystals
    Causes Contact Dermatitis:
    Yes
    Poison Part:
    Flowers
    Fruits
    Leaves
    Roots
    Sap/Juice
    Seeds
    Stems