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Mountain Angelica Angelica triquinata

Other Common Name(s):

Previously known as:

  • Angelica curtisii
  • Angelica saxatilis
Phonetic Spelling
an-JEL-ee-kuh try-quin-AY-tuh
This plant has low severity poison characteristics.
See below
Description

Filmy Angelica most commonly grows in the open areas of woods and meadows of the central to southern Appalachian mountains preferring moderate to high elevations. It is a herbaceous perennial that enjoys full sun to part shade with a stem that changes from green to purplish as it ages and can grow up to 6 feet high.  At times in the life cycle, the sheaths covering the stems can give the plant a 'filmy' look.  Flowers bloom in August-September in North Carolina.

While not much is known of the poisonous characteristics of this plant, it does cause bees, yellow jackets, hornets, and other insects that consume the nectar to appear intoxicated or lethargic thus the flower is suspected to be poisonous.  It may also cause sensitivity to sunlight and contact dermatitis if brushed up against.

 

 

See this plant in the following landscape:
Cultivars / Varieties:
Tags:
#yellow#fall flowers#perennial#yellow-green#green flowers#yellow flowers#fall interest#meadow#stream banks#native wildflower#wildflower garden#woodlands#wet soil intolerant
 
Cultivars / Varieties:
Tags:
#yellow#fall flowers#perennial#yellow-green#green flowers#yellow flowers#fall interest#meadow#stream banks#native wildflower#wildflower garden#woodlands#wet soil intolerant
  • Attributes:
    Genus:
    Angelica
    Species:
    triquinata
    Family:
    Apiaceae
    Life Cycle:
    Perennial
    Recommended Propagation Strategy:
    Seed
    Country Or Region Of Origin:
    GA, KY, MD, NC, PA, SC, TN, VA, WV
    Distribution:
    Mountainous forests, stream margins and meadows
    Wildlife Value:
    Attracts bees and other insect pollinators
    Dimensions:
    Height: 3 ft. 0 in. - 6 ft. 0 in.
    Width: 2 ft. 0 in. - 4 ft. 0 in.
  • Whole Plant Traits:
    Plant Type:
    Herbaceous Perennial
    Native Plant
    Wildflower
    Habit/Form:
    Erect
    Growth Rate:
    Medium
    Maintenance:
    Low
    Texture:
    Medium
  • Cultural Conditions:
    Light:
    Full sun (6 or more hours of direct sunlight a day)
    Partial Shade (Direct sunlight only part of the day, 2-6 hours)
    Soil pH:
    Acid (<6.0)
    Neutral (6.0-8.0)
    Soil Drainage:
    Moist
    Occasionally Dry
    Occasionally Wet
    Available Space To Plant:
    3 feet-6 feet
    NC Region:
    Mountains
    USDA Plant Hardiness Zone:
    5b, 5a, 6b, 6a, 7b, 7a, 8b, 8a
  • Fruit:
    Fruit Color:
    Cream/Tan
    Gold/Yellow
    Fruit Type:
    Schizocarp
    Fruit Length:
    < 1 inch
    Fruit Width:
    < 1 inch
    Fruit Description:
    Striped smooth seeds are flattened with 2 lateral wings that fruits in September - October in NC.
  • Flowers:
    Flower Color:
    Gold/Yellow
    Green
    Pink
    White
    Flower Inflorescence:
    Umbel
    Flower Value To Gardener:
    Showy
    Flower Bloom Time:
    Summer
    Flower Size:
    < 1 inch
    Flower Description:
    Compound umbels are 3-6 inches across with 13 to 25 umbellets. Flowers are pale green to greenish-white and sometimes tinged with pink. Blooms August - September in NC. Nectar may be intoxicating to bees, yellow jackets, hornets and other insects.
  • Leaves:
    Leaf Color:
    Green
    Leaf Type:
    Compound (Pinnately , Bipinnately, Palmately)
    Leaf Arrangement:
    Alternate
    Leaf Shape:
    Lanceolate
    Oblong
    Obovate
    Leaf Margin:
    Dentate
    Lobed
    Hairs Present:
    Yes
    Leaf Length:
    > 6 inches
    Leaf Description:
    Leaves contain 3 inch leaflets which are coarsely toothed, may be lobed with a marginal fringe of minute hairs and a sharp-pointed apex. The veined leaves may be elliptical to lanceolate shape.
  • Stem:
    Stem Color:
    Green
    Purple/Lavender
    Red/Burgundy
    Stem Is Aromatic:
    No
    Stem Surface:
    Smooth (glabrous)
    Stem Description:
    Stems often go from a green to a reddish-purple as it ages and becomes slightly hairy towards inflorescence.
  • Landscape:
    Landscape Location:
    Meadow
    Slope/Bank
    Woodland
    Landscape Theme:
    Native Garden
    Pollinator Garden
    Rain Garden
    Attracts:
    Bees
    Butterflies
    Pollinators
    Resistance To Challenges:
    Wet Soil
  • Poisonous to Humans:
    Poison Severity:
    Low
    Poison Symptoms:
    Nectar is poisonous to some insects (bees, yellow jackets, hornets) and causes them to appear intoxicated. Can cause photosensitivity (sunburn, dermatitis).
    Poison Toxic Principle:
    Furocoumarins
    Causes Contact Dermatitis:
    Yes
    Poison Part:
    Flowers
    Leaves
    Roots
    Sap/Juice
    Stems